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Published on March 12, 2020

How to Create Social Goals to Make an Impact in the World

How to Create Social Goals to Make an Impact in the World

As you pursue personal success, you need to bear in mind that you owe it as a duty to humanity to make the world a better place — to touch lives, preserve nature, and contribute your quota to help fight the world’s social problems, such as poverty, hunger, lack of quality education, HIV/AIDS, climate change, cancer, etc.

By taking a bit of time from your busy schedule, you can set aside some hours aside weekly or monthly or spend a portion of your annual leave pursuing a variety of social goals in your neighborhood, local community or around the world.

In this article, you can find some tips on how to set your own social goals. I have also shared some examples of such goals you can use to inspire you in setting your own.

What Are Social Goals?

Social goals can be described as the goals that connect an individual or group to their immediate world — to make an impact, to create values, to affect lives, to provide or preserve social amenities or infrastructure, to solve social problems, and/or to protect the natural environment.

Social goals can appear at the individual or corporate level. Corporate social goals are usually described as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), while some personal social goals can be described as community service. The focus of this article is personal social goals.

Why Social Goals Are Important

Setting and pursuing social goals can remind you that you are an important stakeholder in the overall development of society. There are diverse problems in communities and around the world that require more than government efforts. Individuals can join hands with the government to address some of these challenges. Below are some of the reasons you should set social goals and “get involved.”

To Touch Lives

There are many disadvantaged people around the world who also have great potential. When you set goals to meet social needs, such as feeding the poor and educating the underprivileged, you are touching lives and transforming destinies.

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To Find Your True Passion

Your social goals can indeed help you find your true passion. In many instances, your chosen career may not be your true passion, even if you are successful. By getting involved in some social responsibilities, you might be able to find your true passion — something to live the rest of your life for.

To Stay Motivated

Meeting social needs and achieving social goals can also be a source of motivation that can boost your performance in other areas of your life. When you focus too much on yourself and your career, you might get bored with routines and begin to lose motivation, but getting involved and achieving results in something different can be a source of motivation that can spill over to your career.

To Boost Your Public Image

While carrying out the honest duties of touching lives and meeting needs, there is a chance that you will begin to get some recognition for what you are doing, and this can boost your public image. You will also get to meet a lot of people and grow your network in your social pursuits.

How to Set Social Goals

Now that you know how important social goals can be, how do you go about setting your own goals and making your own contributions? Here are some tips below:

1. Consider Your Interests

To start setting your own goals, you have to start with your own interests. Search deep within to know if you have had a growing concern about any group of people or any social issues now or in the past.

A famous American preacher, Mike Murdock once said:[1]

“Those who unlock your compassion are those to whom you’ve been assigned.”

The things that make you feel like you need to do something can help you identify the areas where you can help.

2. Do Some Research

Search your community or online to find the current needs and opportunities available to touch lives and make a positive social impact around the world. For example, you can review the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development[2] to know the priority areas of need and use the information to draw out some of your goals.

You can also talk to charities, advocacy groups, or volunteering centers to know what needs they currently have.

3. Look at Your Schedule

The time you can devote to social causes depends on your current schedule, and this will determine how involved you can be and what goals you should set. If you do not have the time, your goals can be more of a financial commitment rather than physical involvement. However, if you have more time to yourself on certain days, you can get involved physically, too.

4. Review Your Abilities

This is about your talent, skills, abilities, expertise, and resources. As much as you want to help, you can’t do anything outside of your own capacity. Check in with your abilities and resources, what can you do, and what needs you can meet. It may be that you do not have the capacity but can mobilize resources and expertise from other sources to meet certain needs.

5. Decide on Your Goals

You will have many options before you, but you have to decide on which goals you want to pursue based on what is most important to you, what you can devote your time to, and what your resources can handle.

10 Examples of Social Goals

Below are 10 examples of social goals you can choose from. They can also inspire you to set your own goals.

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1. Be a Volunteer

One of the ways to “get involved” is by being a volunteer, and there are different ways to go about this. For example, you can volunteer to teach your favorite subject at your community school, visit a senior citizens’ center to help, prepare and serve meals at a homeless shelter or soup kitchen, etc.

If you want to learn how to fit volunteerism into your schedule, this article may help.

2. Donate a Portion of Your Income to Charity

Set a goal to donate a portion of your monthly or annual income to charity. This might also be an option if you do not have the time to get physically involved in an organization.

3. Join an Advocacy Group to Reduce Carbon Emissions

If you have a passion to curb the effects of climate change or to stop environmental degradation, you can start or join an advocacy group to educate, enlighten, and mobilize the public on compliance.

4. Become a Mentor

Sometimes, making yourself available to guide younger people and mentor them might be something you can do to help. Young people are always on the lookout for someone to look up to. Sharing your wealth of experience with young people in your community and guiding them on what steps to take to also become successful can be a great idea.

5. Attend Community Meetings

Attending community meetings will open your eyes to the needs around you. Keep regular attendance and participate in community joint initiatives. You can also volunteer to serve on a community board.

6. Request Charitable Donations on Your Birthdays

Another good initiative is using the occasion of your birthdays to make charitable donations. Asking your friends and well-wishers to support you in this initiative can yield desirable results.

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7. Coach a Youth Sports Team

If you are passionate about sports, you can raise new talent by coaching a youth sports team. You can also use the opportunity for youth mentoring.

8. Donate Your Old Clothes

You probably have plenty of clothes in your wardrobe that you don’t get to wear often. Any clothing (apart from clothes reserved for special occasions) that you have not worn for the past six months can be given out. You can also decide to change your wardrobe yearly to give out your old clothes to those who need them.

9. Become CPR Certified

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is a life-saving skill you can acquire to save lives in the event of an emergency. If you get certified, you will not only be able to use it to save lives, but you will also be able to train several others.

10. Help Victims of Natural Disasters

Hurricanes, tornadoes, landslides, or forest fires happen around the world, and a countless number of people are suffering the aftermaths of these disasters. You can set a goal to provide help for such people, either by sending relief materials or by volunteering to build temporary shelters.

Final Thoughts

People can be remembered for their personal accomplishments, but the memories that linger most are how they have used their lives and resources to touch lives and make their societies better. Setting and pursuing social goals can give you the opportunity to put your name in the hearts of humans and feature in other people’s life stories.

More Tips on Setting Social Goals

Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

Reference

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Leon Ho

Founder & CEO of Lifehack

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Last Updated on February 11, 2021

Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

Easily Misunderstood by Others? 6 Barriers You Should Overcome to Make Communication Less Frustrating

How often have you said something simple, only to have the person who you said this to misunderstand it or twist the meaning completely around? Nodding your head in affirmative? Then this means that you are being unclear in your communication.

Communication should be simple, right? It’s all about two people or more talking and explaining something to the other. The problem lies in the talking itself, somehow we end up being unclear, and our words, attitude or even the way of talking becomes a barrier in communication, most of the times unknowingly. We give you six common barriers to communication, and how to get past them; for you to actually say what you mean, and or the other person to understand it as well…

The 6 Walls You Need to Break Down to Make Communication Effective

Think about it this way, a simple phrase like “what do you mean” can be said in many different ways and each different way would end up “communicating” something else entirely. Scream it at the other person, and the perception would be anger. Whisper this is someone’s ear and others may take it as if you were plotting something. Say it in another language, and no one gets what you mean at all, if they don’t speak it… This is what we mean when we say that talking or saying something that’s clear in your head, many not mean that you have successfully communicated it across to your intended audience – thus what you say and how, where and why you said it – at times become barriers to communication.[1]

Perceptual Barrier

The moment you say something in a confrontational, sarcastic, angry or emotional tone, you have set up perceptual barriers to communication. The other person or people to whom you are trying to communicate your point get the message that you are disinterested in what you are saying and sort of turn a deaf ear. In effect, you are yelling your point across to person who might as well be deaf![2]

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The problem: When you have a tone that’s not particularly positive, a body language that denotes your own disinterest in the situation and let your own stereotypes and misgivings enter the conversation via the way you talk and gesture, the other person perceives what you saying an entirely different manner than say if you said the same while smiling and catching their gaze.

The solution: Start the conversation on a positive note, and don’t let what you think color your tone, gestures of body language. Maintain eye contact with your audience, and smile openly and wholeheartedly…

Attitudinal Barrier

Some people, if you would excuse the language, are simply badass and in general are unable to form relationships or even a common point of communication with others, due to their habit of thinking to highly or too lowly of them. They basically have an attitude problem – since they hold themselves in high esteem, they are unable to form genuine lines of communication with anyone. The same is true if they think too little of themselves as well.[3]

The problem: If anyone at work, or even in your family, tends to roam around with a superior air – anything they say is likely to be taken by you and the others with a pinch, or even a bag of salt. Simply because whenever they talk, the first thing to come out of it is their condescending attitude. And in case there’s someone with an inferiority complex, their incessant self-pity forms barriers to communication.

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The solution: Use simple words and an encouraging smile to communicate effectively – and stick to constructive criticism, and not criticism because you are a perfectionist. If you see someone doing a good job, let them know, and disregard the thought that you could have done it better. It’s their job so measure them by industry standards and not your own.

Language Barrier

This is perhaps the commonest and the most inadvertent of barriers to communication. Using big words, too much of technical jargon or even using just the wrong language at the incorrect or inopportune time can lead to a loss or misinterpretation of communication. It may have sounded right in your head and to your ears as well, but if sounded gobbledygook to the others, the purpose is lost.

The problem: Say you are trying to explain a process to the newbies and end up using every technical word and industry jargon that you knew – your communication has failed if the newbie understood zilch. You have to, without sounding patronizing, explain things to someone in the simplest language they understand instead of the most complex that you do.

The solution: Simplify things for the other person to understand you, and understand it well. Think about it this way: if you are trying to explain something scientific to a child, you tone it down to their thinking capacity, without “dumbing” anything down in the process.[4]

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Emotional Barrier

Sometimes, we hesitate in opening our mouths, for fear of putting our foot in it! Other times, our emotional state is so fragile that we keep it and our lips zipped tightly together lest we explode. This is the time that our emotions become barriers to communication.[5]

The problem: Say you had a fight at home and are on a slow boil, muttering, in your head, about the injustice of it all. At this time, you have to give someone a dressing down over their work performance. You are likely to transfer at least part of your angst to the conversation then, and talk about unfairness in general, leaving the other person stymied about what you actually meant!

The solution: Remove your emotions and feelings to a personal space, and talk to the other person as you normally would. Treat any phobias or fears that you have and nip them in the bud so that they don’t become a problem. And remember, no one is perfect.

Cultural Barrier

Sometimes, being in an ever-shrinking world means that inadvertently, rules can make cultures clash and cultural clashes can turn into barriers to communication. The idea is to make your point across without hurting anyone’s cultural or religious sentiments.

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The problem: There are so many ways culture clashes can happen during communication and with cultural clashes; it’s not always about ethnicity. A non-smoker may have problems with smokers taking breaks; an older boss may have issues with younger staff using the Internet too much.

The solution: Communicate only what is necessary to get the point across – and eave your personal sentiments or feelings out of it. Try to be accommodative of the other’s viewpoint, and in case you still need to work it out, do it one to one, to avoid making a spectacle of the other person’s beliefs.[6]

Gender Barrier

Finally, it’s about Men from Mars and Women from Venus. Sometimes, men don’t understand women and women don’t get men – and this gender gap throws barriers in communication. Women tend to take conflict to their graves, literally, while men can move on instantly. Women rely on intuition, men on logic – so inherently, gender becomes a big block in successful communication.[7]

The problem: A male boss may inadvertently rub his female subordinates the wrong way with anti-feminism innuendoes, or even have problems with women taking too many family leaves. Similarly, women sometimes let their emotions get the better of them, something a male audience can’t relate to.

The solution: Talk to people like people – don’t think or classify them into genders and then talk accordingly. Don’t make comments or innuendos that are gender biased – you don’t have to come across as an MCP or as a bra-burning feminist either. Keep gender out of it.

And remember, the key to successful communication is simply being open, making eye contact and smiling intermittently. The battle is usually half won when you say what you mean in simple, straightforward words and keep your emotions out of it.

Reference

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