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10 Best Laptop Backpacks for Everyday Carry

10 Best Laptop Backpacks for Everyday Carry
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Living in the digital age, it’s no surprise that most of us need our laptops with us at all times.We go to business meetings with them. We go to lectures with them. And we even bring our laptop with us when we travel or go hiking. Given this, it’s important to have a backpack that you can use to keep your laptop safe at all times. (As well as helping to carry the essentials such as a mouse, power supply, etc.)

There are lots of backpacks available – so which one to choose?

Fortunately, the editorial team at Lifehack has hand-picked 10 of the very best laptop backpacks for you. Let’s take a look at them right now.

1. TYLT Powerbag Travel Battery Charging Backpack

    This hi-tech backpack features a USB charging hub for phones, laptops, tablets and portable electronics, and can charge up to three devices using a powerful built in rechargeable 10,400 mAh battery. The backpacks work with all USB charging cables for fast convenient recharging of virtually any cell phone or electronic device (two 1 Amp ports and one 2.1 Amp port). The backpack also offers cord routing anchors to organize cables.

    TYLT Powerbag Travel Battery Charging Backpack, $99.43

    2. Incase Icon Pack

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      The Incase Icon Pack features a huge number of individual pockets and organizational sections, designed to hold everything from pens to keys to tablets to headphones to smartphones. Handily, the backpack also stands up on its own, making access very easy. (This may not work if the backpack is overloaded and top heavy.) The laptop space is well padded with a plush lining, and once you’ve inserted your laptop – the bag still has plenty of space left. A nice touch is the different compartments the backpack offers for tablets, laptops and accessories.

      Incase Icon Pack, $153.15

      3. OutdoorMaster Hiking Backpack 50L

        A spacious backpack brimming with pockets and features. It’s great for hiking, travel, camping, and as carry-on luggage. This good-looking backpack includes a waterproof rain cover, a padded laptop compartment (15.6″) and plenty of room for all your equipment and accessories.

        OutdoorMaster Hiking Backpack 50L, $36.99

        4. ASUS Republic of Gamers Nomad v2 Backpack

          If you’re a keen gamer, then this backpack is designed especially for you. An internal suspension and padding system is designed to keep up to 17″ notebooks safe during travel. The backpack also includes tailored compartments for all other gaming hardware.

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          ASUS Republic of Gamers Nomad v2 Backpack, $169

          5. ProTactic 350 AW Camera Backpack From Lowepro

            This high-end backpack is aimed at amateur and professional photographers. As well as a section to house a laptop, there are also specially designed compartments to protect lens and cameras. (Fits 1-2 Pro DSLRs, one with up to 24-70mm f/2.8 lens attached, 6 lenses/speed lights, 13″ laptop, tripod and accessories.)

            ProTactic 350 AW Camera Backpack From Lowepro, $149

            6. Booq Boa Squeeze

              As the image shows, this backpack has a unique turtle shell design, which helps to distribute the weight of the bag load better than most other backpacks. It also features ergonomic shoulder straps, which contour to all body types, and removable key fob and high-performance YKK® zippers.

              Booq Boa Squeeze, $129.95

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              7. Targus Drifter II Backpack for 17-Inch Laptop

                One of the main selling points of this backpack is its jumbo storage capacity. The largest compartment features a well-padded laptop sleeve that can hold a laptop up to 17″ in size. The backpack also offers shock-absorbing shoulder straps and thick padding on the back to help ease the burden of a full (and heavy) load.

                Targus Drifter II Backpack for 17-Inch Laptop, $61.07

                8. Lifepack Solar Powered and Anti-Theft Backpack with laptop storage

                  If you’re looking for a unique backpack – then look no further than this one! Firstly, the Lifepack offers a 3-in-1 powerbank, bluetooth speakers and a solar charger. In other words, you can charge your laptop, cell phone or tablet exclusively with solar power. In addition, the backpack also has an integrated retractable lock and built-in rain cover. We think this would be a great bag for city people or riders.

                  Lifepack Solar Powered and Anti-Theft Backpack with laptop storage, $199.99

                  9. NIID-UNO I Water Repellent Slim Laptop Backpack

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                    This ultra-stylish backpack has tons of storage space, which includes a smart organizing system with in-built USB charging port. The backpack is suitable for laptops up to 15.6″ in size. The exterior is made from durable eco-polyester with water repellent coating. Inside the bag, you’ll find three different types of interior panels specially designed for cameras, sports and art. The bag is ideal for city and nature walkers.

                    NIID-UNO I Water Repellent Slim Laptop Backpack, $79.99

                    10. AmazonBasics Backpack for Laptops Up To 17″

                      If your budget is the most important thing, then you should definitely consider this Amazon backpack. It has a huge storage space, and meets all the basic needs without being pricey. We think it’s great for people who just want a standard laptop backpack.

                      AmazonBasics Backpack for Laptops Up To 17″, $29.99

                      Hopefully, from the list above, you’ll be able to pick the perfect laptop backpack for your needs.

                      And please remember to check back with us regularly, as we’ll be providing other hardware recommendations that you won’t want to miss!

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                      Featured photo credit: OutdoorMaster via amazon.com

                      More by this author

                      Brian Lee

                      Chief of Product Management at Lifehack

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                      Trending in Productivity

                      1 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021 2 How a Project Management Mindset Boosts Your Productivity 3 5 Values of an Effective Leader 4 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 5 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

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                      Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                      No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                      Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                      Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                      A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                      Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                      In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                      From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                      A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                      For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                      This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                      The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                      That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                      Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                      The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                      Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                      But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                      The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                      The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                      A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                      For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                      But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                      If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                      For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                      These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                      For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                      How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                      Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                      Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                      Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                      My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                      Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                      I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                      More on Building Habits

                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                      Reference

                      [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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