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Struggling to Make More Money? These 20 High-Paying Part-Time Jobs Can Help You Out

Struggling to Make More Money? These 20 High-Paying Part-Time Jobs Can Help You Out
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The working landscape has drastically changed.

We are firmly in the age of start ups. Everyone is an entrepreneur and wants to forge their own path. Traditional jobs are viewed as mind numbing, creativity stealing prisons that enslave the soul. Working a regular job–the good ole nine-to-five is considered old school and has been replaced by maintaining multiple side hustles. We are ambitious DIY-ers, content curators, and creatives and we all want to be our own boss.

While being an entrepreneur is very trendy and the “it” thing to do, it is also very hard and extremely risky. And the struggle of trying making ends meet–especially in the infancy stages of building your brand and making your mark–can be demoralizing.

A great way to– somewhat–maintain your work independence and still survive financially is to work a part time job. Below is a list of 20 side hustles that can help supplement your income or sustain you between ventures:

1. Tutoring

    The possibilities here are endless. You get to set your own hours and pick the days you work. You can work for a company or freelance and you can set your own fees. You can select the subject matter and student age you feel most comfortable with and your work can be hands on or you can tutor online. You can work as much or as little as you like. Getting started is quick and no experience or special skills are required. If you have a knack for helping others learn–this is the perfect side gig for you.

    2. Substitute Teaching

    I know, I know… substitute teaching is everyone’s nightmare. But, if you can get past the stigma and find a decent school district in your area, you could make quite a bit of dough. Subbing is a flexible, fairly well paying side job that doesn’t require a lot of time, money, energy or expertise to do. You do have to pass a background check, get fingerprinted, and supply references–but you will be working with children. As with tutoring, you are able to pick the age range of the students with which you will work. It is a great way to fill the gap if you find yourself between projects.

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    3. Rideshare Driver (Uber/Lyft)

      Rideshare drivers earn between $15-$30 an hour on average depending on where you are located. All you need to get started is a reliable vehicle (that is less than 10 years old), smartphone, and to pass a background check. You set your own hours and work only when you are available. Location is the key driver to earning big bucks in this job. The bigger the city, the higher the pay.

      4. Waiter/Waitress

      There’s a reason actors and musicians work in the restaurant business before they make it big– it pays the bills! You can make a pretty penny waiting tables. Earnings, of course are dependent on factors such as the type of restaurant, the location and the patronage. You usually earn a small minimum wage plus tips. And the best thing about tips is you get access to those immediately. The flexibility with this side gig isn’t quite as free-flowing as some others on this list but you can do it part-time and work your “real job” around this schedule.

      5. Freelance writer/Editor

        You don’t have to be a writer extraordinaire to land a gig writing and blogging for online sites. You do have to have a good command of the English language, have a conversational tone and be somewhat creative. Freelance writing and editing can be lucrative if you are an exceptional writer/editor and have some professional writing experience or if you have specialized knowledge. All you need is a computer, an internet connection and a little determination.

        6. Web-designer

        If you are tech savvy, creative and understand the basic elements of web design, then this is the job for you. Start ups and new business ventures are being launched daily and one thing they all have in common is the need for a website. Designing and updating a website can be a time consuming headache for a small business owner, which is why web design is such a hot hustle right now. Do your research, set reasonable rates and put yourself out there!

        7. Virtual assistant

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          This is the hot new trend in CEO and office land. The traditional 40 hour per week secretary is quickly becoming obsolete. Assistants can now work remotely and maintain a somewhat flexible schedule.

          8. Virtual accountant/bookkeeper

          Similar to virtual assistants, accounting–especially for small businesses and startups–is becoming increasingly more of a part- time endeavor. Many small business and startups don’t have the resources to staff a full time accountant so they will hire a part-time virtual accountant. Qualifications and job experience vary with each position but jobs range from basic bookkeeping and accounting services (invoicing, reconciling, etc.) to more sophisticated services requiring a CPA certification.

          9. Dog walker

            No experience is required for this job. You just need to have a fondness for dogs, a good pair of sneakers and a Pooper-Scooper (there are required licenses and regulations in some states–please do your research before you grab a leash). You can freelance your services or you can join an agency. You can set your own hours, work when you want to and enjoy the great outdoors. What a gig!

            10. Nanny

            Being a nanny or providing child care is a great way to earn some extra cash. If you’re good with kids and have some other skill you can provide–even better! If you can help kids with their homework (tutor), cook nutritious meals, are crafty or can teach kids to play a sport, you can market these skills and set your rates a bit higher. As with anything involving children, you will need to pass a background check.

            11. Special Events Worker

              Big cities and large towns are constantly having special events and they are in need of additional help. These events include things like the annual 5K race, voting events, music and art festivals and the list goes on and on. Some events seek volunteers only while others will pay for your assistance–always be sure to check before you begin working. Most cities have a website or online job board where they post solicitations for upcoming events. Once you’ve worked one event, your name is usually added to their database and they will notify you of upcoming events.

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              12. Personal Shopper

              This is another new and emerging trend in the realm of personal outsourcing. Busy people don’t have time to spend shopping for groceries, pet supplies and other household items–that’s where you come in. We live in an age where time truly is money and this is a great way to capitalize on it.

              13. Fitness Instructor (Personal trainer)

                If you live a fairly healthy lifestyle, workout regularly and like coaching others, this is the side hustle for you! To become a personal trainer or fitness, Pilates, yoga, Zumba (etc.) instructor you do have to go through a certification process. Once that is complete you have the option to freelance your services or you can join a gym.

                14. Social Media Strategist

                If you have a knack for posting content that goes viral or if you have a large Instagram or Twitter following, social media strategist may be the part time job for you. Companies, small businesses and individuals looking to build their personal brand will pay you to post on their behalf and manage their online persona. You’re on social media all day anyway, so you might as well get paid for it.

                15. Massage therapist

                  The average massage therapist earns around $40K annually. And while that figure may seem a bit meager and definitely won’t make you rich, it is pretty good considering over half of all massage therapists work part time. To get into this profession you do have to take classes and earn a certification before you can begin accepting clients.

                  16. Photographer

                  If you have an iPhone and an eye for detail, you could make some serious cash snapping pics. You don’t need a fancy camera, state-of-the-art equipment or a major platform to become a photographer. The average smart phone has a decent camera and free editing software is available. You can post your pictures on Instagram and market yourself via social media–all for free. All it takes is a bit of practice, tenacity and finding the right niche.

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                  17. Barber/Hair stylist

                    If you want to work in a barbershop or hair salon you will need formal training and a certification. But if you happen to be a natural at “hooking up” heads you can set up shop in your kitchen and charge your family and friends a small fee to have their “do” done. This is one type of business that grows quickly through word of mouth. If you do a good job you will be overrun with business–so knowing your limits and managing your time well is a must if you decide that hair stylist is the side gig for you.

                    18. Catering

                    This is another side gig that lives and dies by word of mouth. If the food is good and the prices are reasonable–you will always have customers. If you love to cook or bake and have a great signature dish, you’re in business. Hand out free samples, generate some buzz and before you know it, you’ll have a sweet side gig going. Can’t cook? No problem. Catering services are always hiring servers and staff to help set up before and clean up after events. So even if you can’t cook and need some quick cask one weekend, check out local caterers in your area.

                    19. Landscaping

                      Cutting grass, pulling weeds, trimming bushes– a.k.a. yard work–is a great way to make cash quick. Sure it’s back-breaking, dirty and sweaty work but that’s what makes it so lucrative. If you are willing to do what others won’t do, you’ll never go broke. Offer your services in a neighborhood you know well. Make sure you go above and beyond on your first couple of yards–they become your portfolio and your resume–then ask your satisfied customers to recommend you to their neighbors and friends.

                      20. Retail

                      Working retail-part time is good for the pockets in a couple of ways. First you make money and second most stores offer great employee discounts. All you need is a few hours, a big smile, great interpersonal skills and a helpful attitude. Working retail is great if you prefer something a bit more structured and don’t want the hassle of trying to market yourself and drum up your own business.

                      This list of part-time jobs won’t make you rich but these jobs will help you stay a float. And while this is an eclectic list of side hustles, they all have one thing in common. They all require you to work. If you need extra cash and are willing to put yourself out there, get your hands dirty and do a little work, you can earn some serious loot. Now get up and get to work!

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                      1 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021 2 How a Project Management Mindset Boosts Your Productivity 3 5 Values of an Effective Leader 4 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 5 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

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                      Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                      The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                      No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                      Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                      Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                      A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                      Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                      In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                      From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                      A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                      For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                      This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                      The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                      That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                      Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                      The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                      Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                      But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                      The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                      The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                      A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                      For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                      But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                      If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                      For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                      These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                      For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                      How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                      Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                      Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                      Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                      My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                      Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                      I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                      More on Building Habits

                      Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                      Reference

                      [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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