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Struggling to Make More Money? These 20 High-Paying Part-Time Jobs Can Help You Out

Struggling to Make More Money? These 20 High-Paying Part-Time Jobs Can Help You Out

The working landscape has drastically changed.

We are firmly in the age of start ups. Everyone is an entrepreneur and wants to forge their own path. Traditional jobs are viewed as mind numbing, creativity stealing prisons that enslave the soul. Working a regular job–the good ole nine-to-five is considered old school and has been replaced by maintaining multiple side hustles. We are ambitious DIY-ers, content curators, and creatives and we all want to be our own boss.

While being an entrepreneur is very trendy and the “it” thing to do, it is also very hard and extremely risky. And the struggle of trying making ends meet–especially in the infancy stages of building your brand and making your mark–can be demoralizing.

A great way to– somewhat–maintain your work independence and still survive financially is to work a part time job. Below is a list of 20 side hustles that can help supplement your income or sustain you between ventures:

1. Tutoring

    The possibilities here are endless. You get to set your own hours and pick the days you work. You can work for a company or freelance and you can set your own fees. You can select the subject matter and student age you feel most comfortable with and your work can be hands on or you can tutor online. You can work as much or as little as you like. Getting started is quick and no experience or special skills are required. If you have a knack for helping others learn–this is the perfect side gig for you.

    2. Substitute Teaching

    I know, I know… substitute teaching is everyone’s nightmare. But, if you can get past the stigma and find a decent school district in your area, you could make quite a bit of dough. Subbing is a flexible, fairly well paying side job that doesn’t require a lot of time, money, energy or expertise to do. You do have to pass a background check, get fingerprinted, and supply references–but you will be working with children. As with tutoring, you are able to pick the age range of the students with which you will work. It is a great way to fill the gap if you find yourself between projects.

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    3. Rideshare Driver (Uber/Lyft)

      Rideshare drivers earn between $15-$30 an hour on average depending on where you are located. All you need to get started is a reliable vehicle (that is less than 10 years old), smartphone, and to pass a background check. You set your own hours and work only when you are available. Location is the key driver to earning big bucks in this job. The bigger the city, the higher the pay.

      4. Waiter/Waitress

      There’s a reason actors and musicians work in the restaurant business before they make it big– it pays the bills! You can make a pretty penny waiting tables. Earnings, of course are dependent on factors such as the type of restaurant, the location and the patronage. You usually earn a small minimum wage plus tips. And the best thing about tips is you get access to those immediately. The flexibility with this side gig isn’t quite as free-flowing as some others on this list but you can do it part-time and work your “real job” around this schedule.

      5. Freelance writer/Editor

        You don’t have to be a writer extraordinaire to land a gig writing and blogging for online sites. You do have to have a good command of the English language, have a conversational tone and be somewhat creative. Freelance writing and editing can be lucrative if you are an exceptional writer/editor and have some professional writing experience or if you have specialized knowledge. All you need is a computer, an internet connection and a little determination.

        6. Web-designer

        If you are tech savvy, creative and understand the basic elements of web design, then this is the job for you. Start ups and new business ventures are being launched daily and one thing they all have in common is the need for a website. Designing and updating a website can be a time consuming headache for a small business owner, which is why web design is such a hot hustle right now. Do your research, set reasonable rates and put yourself out there!

        7. Virtual assistant

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          This is the hot new trend in CEO and office land. The traditional 40 hour per week secretary is quickly becoming obsolete. Assistants can now work remotely and maintain a somewhat flexible schedule.

          8. Virtual accountant/bookkeeper

          Similar to virtual assistants, accounting–especially for small businesses and startups–is becoming increasingly more of a part- time endeavor. Many small business and startups don’t have the resources to staff a full time accountant so they will hire a part-time virtual accountant. Qualifications and job experience vary with each position but jobs range from basic bookkeeping and accounting services (invoicing, reconciling, etc.) to more sophisticated services requiring a CPA certification.

          9. Dog walker

            No experience is required for this job. You just need to have a fondness for dogs, a good pair of sneakers and a Pooper-Scooper (there are required licenses and regulations in some states–please do your research before you grab a leash). You can freelance your services or you can join an agency. You can set your own hours, work when you want to and enjoy the great outdoors. What a gig!

            10. Nanny

            Being a nanny or providing child care is a great way to earn some extra cash. If you’re good with kids and have some other skill you can provide–even better! If you can help kids with their homework (tutor), cook nutritious meals, are crafty or can teach kids to play a sport, you can market these skills and set your rates a bit higher. As with anything involving children, you will need to pass a background check.

            11. Special Events Worker

              Big cities and large towns are constantly having special events and they are in need of additional help. These events include things like the annual 5K race, voting events, music and art festivals and the list goes on and on. Some events seek volunteers only while others will pay for your assistance–always be sure to check before you begin working. Most cities have a website or online job board where they post solicitations for upcoming events. Once you’ve worked one event, your name is usually added to their database and they will notify you of upcoming events.

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              12. Personal Shopper

              This is another new and emerging trend in the realm of personal outsourcing. Busy people don’t have time to spend shopping for groceries, pet supplies and other household items–that’s where you come in. We live in an age where time truly is money and this is a great way to capitalize on it.

              13. Fitness Instructor (Personal trainer)

                If you live a fairly healthy lifestyle, workout regularly and like coaching others, this is the side hustle for you! To become a personal trainer or fitness, Pilates, yoga, Zumba (etc.) instructor you do have to go through a certification process. Once that is complete you have the option to freelance your services or you can join a gym.

                14. Social Media Strategist

                If you have a knack for posting content that goes viral or if you have a large Instagram or Twitter following, social media strategist may be the part time job for you. Companies, small businesses and individuals looking to build their personal brand will pay you to post on their behalf and manage their online persona. You’re on social media all day anyway, so you might as well get paid for it.

                15. Massage therapist

                  The average massage therapist earns around $40K annually. And while that figure may seem a bit meager and definitely won’t make you rich, it is pretty good considering over half of all massage therapists work part time. To get into this profession you do have to take classes and earn a certification before you can begin accepting clients.

                  16. Photographer

                  If you have an iPhone and an eye for detail, you could make some serious cash snapping pics. You don’t need a fancy camera, state-of-the-art equipment or a major platform to become a photographer. The average smart phone has a decent camera and free editing software is available. You can post your pictures on Instagram and market yourself via social media–all for free. All it takes is a bit of practice, tenacity and finding the right niche.

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                  17. Barber/Hair stylist

                    If you want to work in a barbershop or hair salon you will need formal training and a certification. But if you happen to be a natural at “hooking up” heads you can set up shop in your kitchen and charge your family and friends a small fee to have their “do” done. This is one type of business that grows quickly through word of mouth. If you do a good job you will be overrun with business–so knowing your limits and managing your time well is a must if you decide that hair stylist is the side gig for you.

                    18. Catering

                    This is another side gig that lives and dies by word of mouth. If the food is good and the prices are reasonable–you will always have customers. If you love to cook or bake and have a great signature dish, you’re in business. Hand out free samples, generate some buzz and before you know it, you’ll have a sweet side gig going. Can’t cook? No problem. Catering services are always hiring servers and staff to help set up before and clean up after events. So even if you can’t cook and need some quick cask one weekend, check out local caterers in your area.

                    19. Landscaping

                      Cutting grass, pulling weeds, trimming bushes– a.k.a. yard work–is a great way to make cash quick. Sure it’s back-breaking, dirty and sweaty work but that’s what makes it so lucrative. If you are willing to do what others won’t do, you’ll never go broke. Offer your services in a neighborhood you know well. Make sure you go above and beyond on your first couple of yards–they become your portfolio and your resume–then ask your satisfied customers to recommend you to their neighbors and friends.

                      20. Retail

                      Working retail-part time is good for the pockets in a couple of ways. First you make money and second most stores offer great employee discounts. All you need is a few hours, a big smile, great interpersonal skills and a helpful attitude. Working retail is great if you prefer something a bit more structured and don’t want the hassle of trying to market yourself and drum up your own business.

                      This list of part-time jobs won’t make you rich but these jobs will help you stay a float. And while this is an eclectic list of side hustles, they all have one thing in common. They all require you to work. If you need extra cash and are willing to put yourself out there, get your hands dirty and do a little work, you can earn some serious loot. Now get up and get to work!

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                      Last Updated on October 21, 2019

                      How to Be a Good Leader and Lead Effectively

                      How to Be a Good Leader and Lead Effectively

                      U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a contender for the 2020 Democratic nomination, is a reminder of why I am so drawn to leadership as a topic. Whenever I think it is impossible for me to be more impressed with her, she proves me wrong.

                      Earlier this week, a former marine suggested that he had been in a long-term sexual relationship with the Senator. She flipped the narrative and used the term “Cougar,” a term used to describe older women who date younger men, to reference her alma mater.

                      Rather than calling the young man a liar, or responding to the accusations in kind, she re-focused the conversation back to her message of college affordability and lifted up that “Cougar” was the mascot for her alma mater. She went on to note that tuition at her school was just $50 per semester when she was a student. Class act.

                      But by the end of the week, news broke that U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, another contender for the presidency, had a heart attack. Warren not only wished Sanders a speedy recovery but her campaign sent a meal to his staff. She knew that the hopes of staff, donors and supporters were with the Senator from Vermont and showed genuine compassion and empathy.

                      To me, she has proven time and time again that she is more than a presidential candidate: she belongs in a leadership hall of fame.

                      What makes some people excel as leaders is fascinating. You can read about leadership, research it and talk about it, yet the interest in leadership alone will not make you a better leader.

                      You will have more information than the average person, but becoming a good leader is lifelong work. It requires experience – and lots of it. Most importantly, it requires observation and a commitment to action. Warren observed what was happening with Sen. Sanders, empathized with his team and then took action. Regardless of the outcome of this election, Sanders’ staff will likely never forget her gesture.

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                      You would have had to work on a political campaign in order to appreciate the stress and anxiety that comes with it. In this moment, staff may not remember everything that Warren said throughout the lengthy campaign, but they will remember what she did during an unforgettable time during the campaign.

                      If this model of leadership is appealing, and if you are searching for how to up your own leadership game, read on for six characteristics that good leaders share:

                      1. Good leaders are devoted to the success of the people around them.

                      Good leaders are not self-interested. Sure, they want to succeed, but they also want others to succeed.

                      Good leaders see investing in others just as important as they see investing in themselves. They understand that their success is closely tied to the people around them, and they work to ensure that their peers, employees, friends and family have paths for growth and development.

                      While the leaders may be the people in the spotlight, they are quick to point to the people around them who helped them (the leaders) enter that spotlight. Their willingness to lift others inspires their colleagues’ and friends’ devotion and loyalty.

                      2. Good leaders are not overly dependent on others’ approval.

                      It is important for managers to express their support for their teams; good leaders must be independent of the approval of others. I explained in an article for The Chronicle of Philanthropy, that:[1]

                      “While a desire to be loved is natural, managers who prioritize approval from subordinates will become ineffective supervisors who may do employees harm. For example, a manager driven by a need for approval may shy away from delivering constructive feedback that could help an employee improve. A manager fearful of upsetting someone may tolerate behavior that degrades the work environment and culture.”

                      In yet another example, a manager who is dependent on the approval of others may not make decisions that could be deemed unpopular in the short run but necessary in the long run.

                      Think of the coaches who integrated their sporting teams. Their decision to do so, may have seemed odd, and even wrong, in the moment, but time has proven that those leaders were on the right side of history.

                      3. Good leaders have the capacity to share the spotlight.

                      Attention is nice, but it is not the prime motivator for good leaders. Doing a good job is.

                      For this reason, good leaders are willing to share the spotlight. They aren’t threatened by a lack of attention, and they do not need credit for every accomplishment. They are too focused on their goal and too focused on the urgency of their work.

                      4. Good leaders are students.

                      In the same way that human beings are constantly evolving, so too are leaders. As long as you are living, you have the potential to learn. It doesn’t matter how much knowledge you think you have; you can always learn something new.

                      I have the experience of thinking I was doing everything right as a manager, only to receive conflicting feedback from my team. Perhaps my approach was not working for my team, and I had to be willing to hear their feedback to improve.

                      Good leaders understand that their secret sauce is their willingness to keep receiving information and keep learning. They aren’t intimidated by what they do not know: As long as they maintain a willingness to keep growing, they believe they can overcome any obstacle they face.

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                      As both masters and students, good leaders read, listen and study to grow. They consume content for information, not just entertainment purposes. They aren’t impressed with their knowledge; they are impressed with the learning journey.

                      5. Good leaders view vulnerability as a superpower.

                      It means “replacing ‘professional distance and cool,’ with uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure,” said Emma Sappala in a Dec. 11, 2014, article, “What Bosses Gain by being Vulnerable” for Harvard Business Journal.[2] She went on to note the importance of human connection, which she asserts is often missing at work.

                      “As leaders and employees, we are often taught to keep a distance and project a certain image. An image of confidence, competence and authority. We may disclose our vulnerability to a spouse or close friend behind closed doors at night but we would never show it elsewhere during the day, let alone at work.”

                      This rings so true for me as a woman leader. I was raised believing that any show of emotion in the workplace could be used against me. I was raised believing that it was best for women leaders to be stoic and to “never let ‘em see you sweat.” This may have prevented me from connecting with employees and colleagues on a deeper, more personal level.

                      6. Good leaders understand themselves.

                      I am a huge fan of life coach and spiritual teacher Iyanla Vanzant. In addition to her hit show on the OWN network, Vanzant has authored dozens of books. In her books and teachings, she underscores the importance of knowing ourselves fully. She argues that we must know what makes us tick, what makes us happy and what makes us angry.

                      Self-awareness enables us to put ourselves in situations where we can thrive, and it also enables us to have compassion when we fall short of the goals and expectations we have for ourselves. Relatedly, understanding ourselves will allow us to know our strength. When we know our strengths, we will be able to put people around us who compliment our strengths and fill the gaps in our leadership.

                      Final Thoughts

                      Being a good leader, first and foremost, is an inside job. You must focus on growing as a person regardless of the leadership title that you hold. You cannot take others where you yourself have not been. So focusing on yourself, regardless of your time or where you are in your career will have long term benefits for you and the people around you.

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                      Further, if you want to become a good leader, you should start by setting the intention to do so. What you focus on grows. If you focus on becoming a better leader, you will research and invest in things that help you to fulfill this intention. You will also view the good and bad leadership experiences as steppingstones that hone your character and help you improve.

                      After you set the intention, get really clear on what a good leader looks like to you. Each of us has a different understanding of leadership. Is a good leader someone who takes risk? Is a good leader, in your estimation, someone who develops other leaders? Whatever it is, know what you’re shooting for. Once you define what it means to be a good leader, look for people who exemplify your vision. Watch and engage with them if you can.

                      Finally, understand that becoming a good leader doesn’t happen overnight. You must continually work at improving, investing in yourself and reflecting on what is going well and what you must improve. In this way, every experience is an opportunity to grow and a chance to ask: ‘What is this experience trying to teach me?’ or ‘what action is necessary based on this situation?’

                      If you are committed to questioning, evaluating and acting, you are that much closer to becoming a better leader.

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                      Featured photo credit: Sam Power via unsplash.com

                      Reference

                      [1] The Chronicle of Philanthropy: Why Good Managers Overcome the Desire to Be Liked
                      [2] Harvard Business Journal: What Bosses Gain by being Vulnerable

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