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Creative Brain Test: 10 Best Ways To Test Your Creative Intelligence

Creative Brain Test: 10 Best Ways To Test Your Creative Intelligence
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Did you know you can boost your levels of creativity by simply moving your eyes from side to side? While there is no firmly established formula for creativity, there are ways to increase it; ways just as crazy as eye movement!

Yet, how do we know how creative we are? Luckily for us, there are ways we can test our creativity. Let’s look at 10 of the best ways and see how creative we really are.

Video Summary

1. WKOPAY

What Kind of Person Are You (WKOPAY) is a measure of inquisitiveness, self-confidence, and imagination. This creativity test is a self-assessment for creative intelligence. [1]

Test it: Take a self-assessment and determine what type of personality trait you possess at BuzzFeed.

2. Reverse Thinking

Instead of adopting the typical logical way of looking at a problem, try the reverse approach. Turn around the challenge and look for the opposite ideas.

Example: A good example of reverse thinking is as follows. [2]

  • Typical Approach: How can I double my fan base?
  • Reverse Thinking: How do I make sure I have no fans at all?

Looks like this:

    Test it: Think of a problem you would like to solve. Now think of the reverse of that idea and write it down. Do you see anything interesting?

    3. Anagram

    An anagram is switching of words or word play. It is where we rearrange letters of a word or phrase to produce a new word.

    How it works: Simply rearrange the letters of a word or phrase. For example, change Life hack to hack file.

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    Example: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland author Lewis Carroll famously used anagrams. Carroll’s real name was actually Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. In developing the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, Dodgson began by translating Charles Lutwidge into Latin – Carolus Ludovicus. He then reversed the order of the Latin translation and translated the back into English arriving at Lewis Carroll. [3]

    Looks like this:

      Test it: Test your anagram creating skills at www.wordplays.com.

      4. Storyboarding

      A storyboard is simply a sequence of illustrations demonstrating how a story will unfold.

      How it works: Here is a great step-by-step guide on how to create a storyboard with a group of people. [4]

      • Step 1: Choose the problem.
      • Step 2: Take notes.
      • Step 3: Mind map.
      • Step 4: Crazy eights.
      • Step 5: Storyboard.
      • Step 6: Silent critique.
      • Step 7: 3-minute critiques.
      • Step 8: Super vote.

      Looks like this:

        Test it: Choose a problem, grab a piece of blank paper, fold the blank sheet of paper in half four times, then unfold it. Take five minutes to draw eight sketches (one in each panel) and crank out your ideas. [5]

        5. Riddles

        Riddles are an extremely creative way to wrap your mind around a puzzle shrouded in mystery. Riddles challenge your mind and make you think beyond the simple words. [6]

        How it works: Answering a riddle is difficult enough, but creating one is extremely difficult. Use the following guideline and create your own riddle. [7]

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        • Step 1: Choose an answer.
        • Step 2: Brainstorm your answer.
        • Step 3: Use a thesaurus.
        • Step 4: Think like the object.
        • Step 5: Use figurative language.

        Example:

        • Riddle: Imagine you are in a dark room. How do you get out?
        • Answer: Stop imagining it.

        Test it: Riddles.com is a great place to visit to test your ability to solve riddles. Take their 10 Best Riddles Quiz and see just how inquisitive you are.

        6. Analogy

        An analogy is the comparison or similarity between two things in order to explain something.

        How it works: The following is a great step-by-step outline for creating your own analogy. [8]

        • Step 1: Choose your analogs (two things you are comparing). You should be familiar with analog #1.
        • Step 2: List the characteristics of analog #2.
        • Step 3: Start relating.
        • Step 4: Figure out which points you want to write about.
        • Step 5: Merge and clean up your list.
        • Step 6: Expound on each point.
        • Step 7: Finalize your analogy.

        Example:

        Analogy: Be involved in things but don’t commit. It’s like eggs and bacon. The chicken was involved, the pig was committed.

        Looks like this:

          Test it: Visit Museumofhorror.com and see how creative you are with analogies.

          7. Incomplete Figure

          Incomplete figure is a test developed in the 1960’s by psychologist Ellis Torrance as one of the elements of the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT). [9]

          How it works: With this test, you are provided a shape and asked to complete the image.

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          Looks like this:

            Test it: Visit 99u.com and try it yourself. Print out the figures from the site and see what you can turn them into within 5 minutes.

            8. Nine Dots

            The 9-Dot puzzle is a lateral thinking puzzle that some believe as the origin to the expression thinking outside the box.

            How it works: You have nine dots arranged in a set of three rows. You must draw four continuous straight lines going through the middle of all the nine dots without removing your pencil off the paper. [10]

            Looks like this:

              Alternative Solution: There are alternative solutions to this puzzle. One solution is the Tridimensional solution.

                Test it: Try this puzzle out for yourself online at Brainstorming.co.uk.

                9. Morphological Analysis

                The morphological matrix is a tool that helps us generate ideas based on possible variation of a problem. It provides us a systematic approach in generating a large amount of possibilities.

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                How it works: Use the following steps for this tool. [11]

                • Step 1: State the task clearly and identify the parameters.
                • Step 2: Select the first parameter and enter it as the heading.
                • Step 3: Generate many attributes (including unusual ones) for that parameter. List them in the rows under the column heading.
                • Step 4: Repeat steps 2 and 3 for each parameter. List the attributes for each.
                • Step 5: Randomly select combinations.
                • Step 6: Write each combination and dive into each.
                • Step 7: Explore several potential combinations.
                • Step 8: Choose one of the potential combinations to apply.

                Looks like this:

                  Test it: Identify a problem and follow the tips and suggestions at Creativethinktank.

                  10. SCAMPER

                  SCAMPER is a mnemonic device that stands for: Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Modify, Put to another use, Eliminate, and Reverse. You or your team my find it difficult to identify new ideas. SCAMPER can assist with this. [12]

                  How it works:

                  • Step 1: Find an existing product you want to improve.
                  • Step 2: Ask questions using the mnemonic device SCAMPER to guide you.

                  Example:

                  Example questions for each element of the mnemonic device.

                  • Substitute: What rules could you substitute?
                  • Combine: What could you combine to maximize the uses of this product?
                  • Adapt: What else is like your product?
                  • Modify: What element of this product could you strengthen to create something new?
                  • Put to another use: How would this product behave differently in another setting?
                  • Eliminate: What features, parts, or rules could you eliminate?
                  • Reverse: What if you try to do the exact opposite of what you’re trying to do now?

                  Test it: Identify a product or service you would like to improve. Now, use the mnemonic device SCAMPER to get in the right frame of mind in order to ask the right questions.

                  So, did any of these creativity tests give you a boost in your creative abilities? If not, try them again! Boosting your creativity will help you in every area of life. Use these tools and techniques in order to find your creativity sweet spot and tap into your creative genius!

                  Reference

                  [1] World of Digits: 6 useful creativity tests to know if you are creative
                  [2] Cleverism: 18 best idea generation techniques
                  [3] David Day: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Decoded
                  [4] Co.Design: The 8 steps to creating a great storyboard
                  [5] Co.Design: The 8 steps to creating a great storyboard
                  [6] Riddles: Riddles and answers
                  [7] Read Write Think: Write your own riddle
                  [8] Osmosio: How to create killer analogies by relating anything to anything else
                  [9] 99U: Test your creativity: 5 classic creativity challenges
                  [10] Archimedes’ Laboratory: Most wanted puzzle solutions
                  [11] Center for Creative Learning: Morphological matrix
                  [12] Mind Tools: SCAMPER

                  More by this author

                  Dr. Jamie Schwandt

                  Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt & Red Team Critical Thinker

                  10 Hacks to Increase Your Brain IQ, Focus, and Creativity How to Upgrade Your Critical Thinking Skills and Make Smart Choices The Ultimate Exercises to Improve Posture (Simple and Effective) How Cognitive Learning Benefits Your Brain and Grows Knowledge 9 Game Changing Tips on How to Write Goals (and Reach Them!)

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                  Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                  The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                  The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                  No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                  Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                  Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                  A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                  Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                  In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                  From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                  A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                  For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                  This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                  The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                  That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                  Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                  The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                  Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                  But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                  The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                  The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                  A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                  For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                  But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                  If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                  For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                  These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                  For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                  How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                  Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                  Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                  Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                  My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                  Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                  I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

                  More on Building Habits

                  Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                  Reference

                  [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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