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Creative Brain Test: 10 Best Ways To Test Your Creative Intelligence

Creative Brain Test: 10 Best Ways To Test Your Creative Intelligence

Did you know you can boost your levels of creativity by simply moving your eyes from side to side? While there is no firmly established formula for creativity, there are ways to increase it; ways just as crazy as eye movement!

Yet, how do we know how creative we are? Luckily for us, there are ways we can test our creativity. Let’s look at 10 of the best ways and see how creative we really are.

Video Summary

1. WKOPAY

What Kind of Person Are You (WKOPAY) is a measure of inquisitiveness, self-confidence, and imagination. This creativity test is a self-assessment for creative intelligence. [1]

Test it: Take a self-assessment and determine what type of personality trait you possess at BuzzFeed.

2. Reverse Thinking

Instead of adopting the typical logical way of looking at a problem, try the reverse approach. Turn around the challenge and look for the opposite ideas.

Example: A good example of reverse thinking is as follows. [2]

  • Typical Approach: How can I double my fan base?
  • Reverse Thinking: How do I make sure I have no fans at all?

Looks like this:

    Test it: Think of a problem you would like to solve. Now think of the reverse of that idea and write it down. Do you see anything interesting?

    3. Anagram

    An anagram is switching of words or word play. It is where we rearrange letters of a word or phrase to produce a new word.

    How it works: Simply rearrange the letters of a word or phrase. For example, change Life hack to hack file.

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    Example: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland author Lewis Carroll famously used anagrams. Carroll’s real name was actually Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. In developing the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, Dodgson began by translating Charles Lutwidge into Latin – Carolus Ludovicus. He then reversed the order of the Latin translation and translated the back into English arriving at Lewis Carroll. [3]

    Looks like this:

      Test it: Test your anagram creating skills at www.wordplays.com.

      4. Storyboarding

      A storyboard is simply a sequence of illustrations demonstrating how a story will unfold.

      How it works: Here is a great step-by-step guide on how to create a storyboard with a group of people. [4]

      • Step 1: Choose the problem.
      • Step 2: Take notes.
      • Step 3: Mind map.
      • Step 4: Crazy eights.
      • Step 5: Storyboard.
      • Step 6: Silent critique.
      • Step 7: 3-minute critiques.
      • Step 8: Super vote.

      Looks like this:

        Test it: Choose a problem, grab a piece of blank paper, fold the blank sheet of paper in half four times, then unfold it. Take five minutes to draw eight sketches (one in each panel) and crank out your ideas. [5]

        5. Riddles

        Riddles are an extremely creative way to wrap your mind around a puzzle shrouded in mystery. Riddles challenge your mind and make you think beyond the simple words. [6]

        How it works: Answering a riddle is difficult enough, but creating one is extremely difficult. Use the following guideline and create your own riddle. [7]

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        • Step 1: Choose an answer.
        • Step 2: Brainstorm your answer.
        • Step 3: Use a thesaurus.
        • Step 4: Think like the object.
        • Step 5: Use figurative language.

        Example:

        • Riddle: Imagine you are in a dark room. How do you get out?
        • Answer: Stop imagining it.

        Test it: Riddles.com is a great place to visit to test your ability to solve riddles. Take their 10 Best Riddles Quiz and see just how inquisitive you are.

        6. Analogy

        An analogy is the comparison or similarity between two things in order to explain something.

        How it works: The following is a great step-by-step outline for creating your own analogy. [8]

        • Step 1: Choose your analogs (two things you are comparing). You should be familiar with analog #1.
        • Step 2: List the characteristics of analog #2.
        • Step 3: Start relating.
        • Step 4: Figure out which points you want to write about.
        • Step 5: Merge and clean up your list.
        • Step 6: Expound on each point.
        • Step 7: Finalize your analogy.

        Example:

        Analogy: Be involved in things but don’t commit. It’s like eggs and bacon. The chicken was involved, the pig was committed.

        Looks like this:

          Test it: Visit Museumofhorror.com and see how creative you are with analogies.

          7. Incomplete Figure

          Incomplete figure is a test developed in the 1960’s by psychologist Ellis Torrance as one of the elements of the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT). [9]

          How it works: With this test, you are provided a shape and asked to complete the image.

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          Looks like this:

            Test it: Visit 99u.com and try it yourself. Print out the figures from the site and see what you can turn them into within 5 minutes.

            8. Nine Dots

            The 9-Dot puzzle is a lateral thinking puzzle that some believe as the origin to the expression thinking outside the box.

            How it works: You have nine dots arranged in a set of three rows. You must draw four continuous straight lines going through the middle of all the nine dots without removing your pencil off the paper. [10]

            Looks like this:

              Alternative Solution: There are alternative solutions to this puzzle. One solution is the Tridimensional solution.

                Test it: Try this puzzle out for yourself online at Brainstorming.co.uk.

                9. Morphological Analysis

                The morphological matrix is a tool that helps us generate ideas based on possible variation of a problem. It provides us a systematic approach in generating a large amount of possibilities.

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                How it works: Use the following steps for this tool. [11]

                • Step 1: State the task clearly and identify the parameters.
                • Step 2: Select the first parameter and enter it as the heading.
                • Step 3: Generate many attributes (including unusual ones) for that parameter. List them in the rows under the column heading.
                • Step 4: Repeat steps 2 and 3 for each parameter. List the attributes for each.
                • Step 5: Randomly select combinations.
                • Step 6: Write each combination and dive into each.
                • Step 7: Explore several potential combinations.
                • Step 8: Choose one of the potential combinations to apply.

                Looks like this:

                  Test it: Identify a problem and follow the tips and suggestions at Creativethinktank.

                  10. SCAMPER

                  SCAMPER is a mnemonic device that stands for: Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Modify, Put to another use, Eliminate, and Reverse. You or your team my find it difficult to identify new ideas. SCAMPER can assist with this. [12]

                  How it works:

                  • Step 1: Find an existing product you want to improve.
                  • Step 2: Ask questions using the mnemonic device SCAMPER to guide you.

                  Example:

                  Example questions for each element of the mnemonic device.

                  • Substitute: What rules could you substitute?
                  • Combine: What could you combine to maximize the uses of this product?
                  • Adapt: What else is like your product?
                  • Modify: What element of this product could you strengthen to create something new?
                  • Put to another use: How would this product behave differently in another setting?
                  • Eliminate: What features, parts, or rules could you eliminate?
                  • Reverse: What if you try to do the exact opposite of what you’re trying to do now?

                  Test it: Identify a product or service you would like to improve. Now, use the mnemonic device SCAMPER to get in the right frame of mind in order to ask the right questions.

                  So, did any of these creativity tests give you a boost in your creative abilities? If not, try them again! Boosting your creativity will help you in every area of life. Use these tools and techniques in order to find your creativity sweet spot and tap into your creative genius!

                  Reference

                  [1] World of Digits: 6 useful creativity tests to know if you are creative
                  [2] Cleverism: 18 best idea generation techniques
                  [3] David Day: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Decoded
                  [4] Co.Design: The 8 steps to creating a great storyboard
                  [5] Co.Design: The 8 steps to creating a great storyboard
                  [6] Riddles: Riddles and answers
                  [7] Read Write Think: Write your own riddle
                  [8] Osmosio: How to create killer analogies by relating anything to anything else
                  [9] 99U: Test your creativity: 5 classic creativity challenges
                  [10] Archimedes’ Laboratory: Most wanted puzzle solutions
                  [11] Center for Creative Learning: Morphological matrix
                  [12] Mind Tools: SCAMPER

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                  Dr. Jamie Schwandt

                  Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt & Red Team Critical Thinker

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                  Last Updated on November 5, 2020

                  How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                  How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                  Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

                  You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. A rut can manifest as a productivity vacuum and be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. Is it possible to learn how to get out of a rut?

                  Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, or a student, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

                  1. Work on Small Tasks

                  When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks that have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

                  Whenever I finish doing that, I generate positive momentum, which I bring forward to my work.

                  If you have a large long-term goal you can’t wait to get started on, break it down into smaller objectives first. This will help each piece feel manageable and help you feel like you’re moving closer to your goal.

                  You can learn more about goals vs objectives here.

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                  2. Take a Break From Your Work Desk

                  When you want to learn how to get out of a rut, get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the bathroom, walk around the office, or go out and get a snack. According to research, your productivity is best when you work for 50 minutes to an hour and then take a 15-20 minute break[1].

                  Your mind may be too bogged down and will need some airing. By walking away from your computer, you may create extra space for new ideas that were hiding behind high stress levels.

                  3. Upgrade Yourself

                  Take the down time to upgrade your knowledge and skills. Go to a seminar, read up on a subject of interest, or start learning a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

                  The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college[2]. How’s that for inspiration?

                  4. Talk to a Friend

                  Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while. Relying on a support system is a great way to work on self-care when you’re learning how to get out of a rut.

                  Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

                  5. Forget About Trying to Be Perfect

                  If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies. Perfectionism can lead you to fear failure, which can ultimate hinder you even more if you’re trying to find motivation to work on something new.

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                  If you allow your perfectionism to fade, soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come, and then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

                  Learn more about How Not to Let Perfectionism Secretly Screw You Up.

                  6. Paint a Vision to Work Towards

                  If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

                  Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the ultimate goal or vision you have for your life?

                  Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action. You can use the power of visualization or even create a vision board if you like to have something to physically remind you of your goals.

                  7. Read a Book (or Blog)

                  The things we read are like food for our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great material.

                  Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. You can also stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs and follow writers who inspire and motivate you. Find something that interests you and start reading.

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                  8. Have a Quick Nap

                  If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep[3].

                  Try a nap if you want to get out of a rut

                    One Harvard study found that “whether they took long naps or short naps, participants showed significant improvement on three of the four tests in the study’s cognitive-assessment battery”[4].

                    9. Remember Why You Are Doing This

                    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

                    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall your inspiration, and perhaps even journal about it to make it feel more tangible.

                    10. Find Some Competition

                    When we are learning how to get out of a rut, there’s nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

                    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, and networking conventions can all inspire you to get a move on. However, don’t let this throw you back into your perfectionist tendencies or low self-esteem.

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                    11. Go Exercise

                    Since you are not making headway at work, you might as well spend the time getting into shape and increasing dopamine levels. Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, or whatever type of exercise helps you start to feel better.

                    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

                    If you need ideas for a quick workout, check out the video below:

                    12. Take a Few Vacation Days

                    If you are stuck in a rut, it’s usually a sign that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

                    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange one or two days to take off from work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax, do your favorite activities, and spend time with family members. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

                    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest.

                    More Tips to Help You Get out of a Rut

                    Featured photo credit: Ashkan Forouzani via unsplash.com

                    Reference

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