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Last Updated on August 15, 2018

Creative Brain Test: 10 Best Ways To Test Your Creative Intelligence

Creative Brain Test: 10 Best Ways To Test Your Creative Intelligence

Did you know you can boost your levels of creativity by simply moving your eyes from side to side? While there is no firmly established formula for creativity, there are ways to increase it; ways just as crazy as eye movement!

Yet, how do we know how creative we are? Luckily for us, there are ways we can test our creativity. Let’s look at 10 of the best ways and see how creative we really are.

Video Summary

1. WKOPAY

What Kind of Person Are You (WKOPAY) is a measure of inquisitiveness, self-confidence, and imagination. This creativity test is a self-assessment for creative intelligence. [1]

Test it: Take a self-assessment and determine what type of personality trait you possess at BuzzFeed.

2. Reverse Thinking

Instead of adopting the typical logical way of looking at a problem, try the reverse approach. Turn around the challenge and look for the opposite ideas.

Example: A good example of reverse thinking is as follows. [2]

  • Typical Approach: How can I double my fan base?
  • Reverse Thinking: How do I make sure I have no fans at all?

Looks like this:

    Test it: Think of a problem you would like to solve. Now think of the reverse of that idea and write it down. Do you see anything interesting?

    3. Anagram

    An anagram is switching of words or word play. It is where we rearrange letters of a word or phrase to produce a new word.

    How it works: Simply rearrange the letters of a word or phrase. For example, change Life hack to hack file.

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    Example: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland author Lewis Carroll famously used anagrams. Carroll’s real name was actually Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. In developing the pseudonym Lewis Carroll, Dodgson began by translating Charles Lutwidge into Latin – Carolus Ludovicus. He then reversed the order of the Latin translation and translated the back into English arriving at Lewis Carroll. [3]

    Looks like this:

      Test it: Test your anagram creating skills at www.wordplays.com.

      4. Storyboarding

      A storyboard is simply a sequence of illustrations demonstrating how a story will unfold.

      How it works: Here is a great step-by-step guide on how to create a storyboard with a group of people. [4]

      • Step 1: Choose the problem.
      • Step 2: Take notes.
      • Step 3: Mind map.
      • Step 4: Crazy eights.
      • Step 5: Storyboard.
      • Step 6: Silent critique.
      • Step 7: 3-minute critiques.
      • Step 8: Super vote.

      Looks like this:

        Test it: Choose a problem, grab a piece of blank paper, fold the blank sheet of paper in half four times, then unfold it. Take five minutes to draw eight sketches (one in each panel) and crank out your ideas. [5]

        5. Riddles

        Riddles are an extremely creative way to wrap your mind around a puzzle shrouded in mystery. Riddles challenge your mind and make you think beyond the simple words. [6]

        How it works: Answering a riddle is difficult enough, but creating one is extremely difficult. Use the following guideline and create your own riddle. [7]

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        • Step 1: Choose an answer.
        • Step 2: Brainstorm your answer.
        • Step 3: Use a thesaurus.
        • Step 4: Think like the object.
        • Step 5: Use figurative language.

        Example:

        • Riddle: Imagine you are in a dark room. How do you get out?
        • Answer: Stop imagining it.

        Test it: Riddles.com is a great place to visit to test your ability to solve riddles. Take their 10 Best Riddles Quiz and see just how inquisitive you are.

        6. Analogy

        An analogy is the comparison or similarity between two things in order to explain something.

        How it works: The following is a great step-by-step outline for creating your own analogy. [8]

        • Step 1: Choose your analogs (two things you are comparing). You should be familiar with analog #1.
        • Step 2: List the characteristics of analog #2.
        • Step 3: Start relating.
        • Step 4: Figure out which points you want to write about.
        • Step 5: Merge and clean up your list.
        • Step 6: Expound on each point.
        • Step 7: Finalize your analogy.

        Example:

        Analogy: Be involved in things but don’t commit. It’s like eggs and bacon. The chicken was involved, the pig was committed.

        Looks like this:

          Test it: Visit Museumofhorror.com and see how creative you are with analogies.

          7. Incomplete Figure

          Incomplete figure is a test developed in the 1960’s by psychologist Ellis Torrance as one of the elements of the Torrance Test of Creative Thinking (TTCT). [9]

          How it works: With this test, you are provided a shape and asked to complete the image.

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          Looks like this:

            Test it: Visit 99u.com and try it yourself. Print out the figures from the site and see what you can turn them into within 5 minutes.

            8. Nine Dots

            The 9-Dot puzzle is a lateral thinking puzzle that some believe as the origin to the expression thinking outside the box.

            How it works: You have nine dots arranged in a set of three rows. You must draw four continuous straight lines going through the middle of all the nine dots without removing your pencil off the paper. [10]

            Looks like this:

              Alternative Solution: There are alternative solutions to this puzzle. One solution is the Tridimensional solution.

                Test it: Try this puzzle out for yourself online at Brainstorming.co.uk.

                9. Morphological Analysis

                The morphological matrix is a tool that helps us generate ideas based on possible variation of a problem. It provides us a systematic approach in generating a large amount of possibilities.

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                How it works: Use the following steps for this tool. [11]

                • Step 1: State the task clearly and identify the parameters.
                • Step 2: Select the first parameter and enter it as the heading.
                • Step 3: Generate many attributes (including unusual ones) for that parameter. List them in the rows under the column heading.
                • Step 4: Repeat steps 2 and 3 for each parameter. List the attributes for each.
                • Step 5: Randomly select combinations.
                • Step 6: Write each combination and dive into each.
                • Step 7: Explore several potential combinations.
                • Step 8: Choose one of the potential combinations to apply.

                Looks like this:

                  Test it: Identify a problem and follow the tips and suggestions at Creativethinktank.

                  10. SCAMPER

                  SCAMPER is a mnemonic device that stands for: Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Modify, Put to another use, Eliminate, and Reverse. You or your team my find it difficult to identify new ideas. SCAMPER can assist with this. [12]

                  How it works:

                  • Step 1: Find an existing product you want to improve.
                  • Step 2: Ask questions using the mnemonic device SCAMPER to guide you.

                  Example:

                  Example questions for each element of the mnemonic device.

                  • Substitute: What rules could you substitute?
                  • Combine: What could you combine to maximize the uses of this product?
                  • Adapt: What else is like your product?
                  • Modify: What element of this product could you strengthen to create something new?
                  • Put to another use: How would this product behave differently in another setting?
                  • Eliminate: What features, parts, or rules could you eliminate?
                  • Reverse: What if you try to do the exact opposite of what you’re trying to do now?

                  Test it: Identify a product or service you would like to improve. Now, use the mnemonic device SCAMPER to get in the right frame of mind in order to ask the right questions.

                  So, did any of these creativity tests give you a boost in your creative abilities? If not, try them again! Boosting your creativity will help you in every area of life. Use these tools and techniques in order to find your creativity sweet spot and tap into your creative genius!

                  Reference

                  [1] World of Digits: 6 useful creativity tests to know if you are creative
                  [2] Cleverism: 18 best idea generation techniques
                  [3] David Day: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Decoded
                  [4] Co.Design: The 8 steps to creating a great storyboard
                  [5] Co.Design: The 8 steps to creating a great storyboard
                  [6] Riddles: Riddles and answers
                  [7] Read Write Think: Write your own riddle
                  [8] Osmosio: How to create killer analogies by relating anything to anything else
                  [9] 99U: Test your creativity: 5 classic creativity challenges
                  [10] Archimedes’ Laboratory: Most wanted puzzle solutions
                  [11] Center for Creative Learning: Morphological matrix
                  [12] Mind Tools: SCAMPER

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                  Dr. Jamie Schwandt

                  Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt & Red Team Critical Thinker

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                  Last Updated on February 21, 2019

                  How to Stop Information Overload

                  How to Stop Information Overload

                  Information overload is a creature that has been growing on the Internet’s back since its beginnings. The bigger the Internet gets, the more information there is. The more quality information we see, the more we want to consume it. The more we want to consume it, the more overloaded we feel.

                  This has to stop somewhere. And it can.

                  As the year comes to a close, there’s no time like the present to make the overloading stop.

                  But before I explain exactly what I mean, let’s discuss information overload in general.

                  How Serious Is Information Overload?

                  The sole fact that there’s more and more information published online every single day is not the actual problem. Only the quality information becomes the problem.

                  This sounds kind of strange…but bear with me.

                  When we see some half-baked blog posts we don’t even consider reading, we just skip to the next thing. But when we see something truly interesting — maybe even epic — we want to consume it.

                  We even feel like we have to consume it. And that’s the real problem.

                  No matter what topic we’re interested in, there are always hundreds of quality blogs publishing entries every single day (or every other day). Not to mention all the forums, message boards, social news sites, and so on.

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                  The amount of epic content on the Internet these days is so big that it’s virtually impossible for us to digest it all. But we try anyway.

                  That’s when we feel overloaded. If you’re not careful, one day you’ll find yourself reading the 15th blog post in a row on some nice WordPress tweaking techniques because you feel that for some reason, “you need to know this.”

                  Information overload is a plague. There’s no vaccine, there’s no cure. The only thing you have is self-control.

                  Luckily, you’re not on your own. There are some tips you can follow to protect yourself from information overload and, ultimately, fight it.

                  But first, admit that information overload is really bad for you.

                  Why Information Overload Is Bad for You

                  Information overload stops you from taking action. That’s the biggest problem here.

                  When you try to consume more and more information every day, you start to notice that even though you’ve been reading tons of articles, watching tons of videos and listening to tons of podcasts, the stream of incoming information seems to be infinite.

                  Therefore, you convince yourself that you need to be on a constant lookout for new information if you want to be able to accomplish anything in your life, work and/or passion. The final result is that you are consuming way too much information, and taking way too little action because you don’t have enough time for it.

                  The belief that you need to be on this constant lookout for information is just not true.

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                  You don’t need every piece of advice possible to live your life, do your work or enjoy your passion.

                  How to Stop Information Overload (And Start to Achieve More)

                  So how to recognize the portion of information that you really need? Start with setting goals.

                  1. Set Your Goals

                  If you don’t have your goals put in place, you’ll be just running around grabbing every possible advice and thinking that it’s “just what you’ve been looking for.”

                  Setting goals is a much more profound task than just a way to get rid of information overload. Now by “goals” I don’t mean things like “get rich, have kids, and live a good life”. I mean something much more within your immediate grasp. Something that can be achieved in the near future — like within a month (or a year) at most.

                  Basically, something that you want to attract to your life, and you already have some plan on how you’re going to make it happen. So no hopes and dreams, just actionable, precise goals.

                  Then once you have your goals, they become a set of strategies and tactics you need to act upon.

                  2. Know What to Skip When Facing New Information

                  Once you have your goals, plans, strategies and tasks, you can use them to decide what information is really crucial.

                  First of all, if the information you’re about to read has nothing to do with your current goals and plans, then skip it. You don’t need it.

                  If it does, then ask yourself these questions:

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                  • Will you be able to put this information into action immediately?
                  • Does it have the potential to maybe alter your nearest actions/tasks?
                  • Is it so incredible that you absolutely need to take action on it right away?

                  If the information is not actionable in a day or two, then skip it.

                  (You’ll forget about it anyway.)

                  And that’s basically it. Digest only what can be used immediately. If you have a task that you need to do, consume only the information necessary for getting this one task done, nothing more.

                  You need to be focused in order to have clear judgment, and be able to decide whether some piece of information is mandatory or redundant.

                  Self-control comes handy too. It’s quite easy to convince yourself that you really need something just because of poor self-control. Try to fight this temptation, and be as ruthless about it as possible – if the information is not matching your goals and plans, and you can’t take action on it in the near future, then SKIP IT.

                  3. Be Aware of the Minimal Effective Dose

                  There’s a thing called the MED – Minimal Effective Dose. I was first introduced to this idea by Tim Ferriss. In his book The 4-Hour BodyTim illustrates the minimal effective dose by talking about medical drugs.

                  Everybody knows that every pill has a MED, and after that specific dose, no other positive effects occur, only some negative side effects if you overdose big.

                  Consuming information is somewhat similar. You need just a precise amount of it to help you to achieve your goals and put your plans into life.

                  Everything more than that amount won’t improve your results any further. And if you try to consume too much of it, it will eventually stop you from taking any action altogether.

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                  4. Don’t Procrastinate by Consuming More Information

                  Probably one of the most common causes of consuming ridiculous amounts of information is the need to procrastinate. By reading yet another article, we often feel that we are indeed working, and that we’re doing something good – we’re learning, which in result will make us a more complete and educated person.

                  This is just self-deception. The truth is we’re simply procrastinating. We don’t feel like doing what really needs to be done – the important stuff – so instead we find something else, and convince ourselves that “that thing” is equally important. Which is just not true.

                  Don’t consume information just for the sake of it. It gets you nowhere.

                  The focus of this article is not on how to stop procrastinating, but if you’re having such issue, I recommend you read this:

                  Procrastination – A Step-By-Step Guide to Stop Procrastinating

                  Summing It Up

                  As you can see, information overload can be a real problem and it can have a sever impact on your productivity and overall performance.

                  I know I have had my share of problems with it (and probably still have from time to time). But creating this simple set of rules helps me to fight it, and to keep my lizard brain from taking over.

                  I hope it helps you too, especially as we head into a new year with a new chance at setting ourselves up for success.

                  More Resources About Boosting Brain Power

                  Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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