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If You Think Work Hard and Play Hard Is Not Practical, You Haven’t Really Tried

If You Think Work Hard and Play Hard Is Not Practical, You Haven’t Really Tried

How many people do you know who complain about work stresses? They may even do a job that they do not enjoy, only to return home at the end of the day with little energy or motivation to do anything. They go to sleep and prepare for the same routine the following day. The concept of work hard play hard is the last thing on their minds.[1] Perhaps you may feel like this some days, too!

A lot of people may not revel in the mundane tasks of their day-to-day life, which is completely normal. As children, we could not wait to become grown-ups, and every year seemed to take forever. Then, one day you were finally an adult, which meant responsibilities, bills, and jobs (but at least you could decide your bed time.)

“Work hard, play hard” is crucial for human development.

In a study published in The Open Psychology Journal, Dr. Lonnie Aarssen conducted a survey that involved almost 1,400 students at Queen’s University.[2] It proved there was a connection between legacy and leisure activities. In other words, the people who had an inclination to work hard also exhibited a strong need for sufficient enjoyment and relaxation.

Dr Aarssen believes that the “work hard, play hard” ethos provides something quite necessary to human existence. “We, unlike any other animals, are aware and concerned about our own self-impermanence,” she said. “Legacy drive and leisure drive have potential to explain our ability to buffer this anxiety. Between these two drives, our ancestors were able to distract from their own self-impermanence, allowing them to cope with the anxiety and thus minimize its potential negative impact on reproductive success.”

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But why is it so hard to get the right balance?

“Work hard, play hard” is sometimes wrongly associated with long days at the office and then going to all-night parties frequently. Yet, this is not a healthy lifestyle either; your body requires enough sleep and we all know that an excessive use of alcohol is never recommended.

Firstly, working hard is not a bad thing. It means that you are being productive to achieve certain goals (which ultimately will lead to affording your lifestyle.)

The “playing hard” part relates to whatever you can do to promote more enjoyment and relaxation in your life. Many people translate this to mean sitting in front of the television for a few hours before eventually going to bed.

I will be honest–when people are talking about the latest or most popular TV series, I am generally clueless. I don’t watch television and I have never owned one. And that is not because I am anti-television; I just never found it mentally relaxing or stimulating.

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Each week, the average American watches more than 34 hours of television. They do it because it appears to be the easiest relaxation outlet. The reality, however, is that you wake up still feeling tired. This is because the artificial lights of the television screen reduce the amount of melatonin your brain creates, which is the hormone responsible for inducing sleep.[3]

By maximizing your free time, you will feel more revitalized, which will lead to being more productive, and therefore make you better able to achieve your goals! Life will also feel more fulfilling than simply “working all the time.”

How to adopt a more “work hard, play hard” lifestyle?

1. Be firm that when you leave work, you actually leave work!

Don’t be tempted to check your work emails at night. Unless it’s an emergency, whatever it is can wait a few hours until the morning.

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2. Identify where you are wasting your free time.

Are you spending hours on television, or on social media every day to unwind? Minimize some of those routines–create a schedule and stick to it.

3. Make a list of the things that interest you instead.

Perhaps there are activities you could do, such as learning another language, going to the gym, or taking up a hobby.

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If leaving the house is not an option, there are other ways to relax at home–perhaps yoga or meditation. Maybe you always wanted to learn to play the guitar, or do some writing? Or, you could simply sit at the dinner table to eat with your loved ones over a conversation, instead of eating in front of the television.

4. Read more.

Reading is one of the best ways to de-stress. Find a book in a genre that appeals to you–you will be more motivated to get to the end.

5. Reward yourself.

Give yourself little treats from time to time. Book an occasional massage, buy tickets to see a show, or whatever you want to splurge on. And whenever possible, travel more! To “work hard, play hard” means that you’ve earned it.

Featured photo credit: Flaticon via flaticon.com

Reference

More by this author

J.S. von Dacre

Writer at Lifehack

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Last Updated on July 2, 2020

7 Ways To Stop Being Lazy And Start Getting Things Done

7 Ways To Stop Being Lazy And Start Getting Things Done

“I’m going to take a lazy day today.”

Okay, there’s nothing wrong with this. It’s called a day off, and it’s a magical thing.

But when every day is a “lazy day,” there’s a problem. Sometimes we just need a kick in the butt to get us up and moving, so we can handle our business effectively.

Often, laziness has a deeper and darker cause that we don’t want to think about, let alone acknowledge. Here are 7 ways to stop being lazy and become more productive.

1 Find Out the Root Cause

Are you burned out from working 27 hours a day, 9 days a week since before you can remember? This is a signal that you need a rest or a change.

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Human beings are not meant to work all the time. Our paleolithic ancestors worked, on average, about 20 hours a week. (Yeah, we members of modern society are getting hosed.) Maybe you feel overwhelmed, are afraid to fail at the task, or you just don’t want to do the task; these are discrete problems with separate solutions.

Finding out the root cause of your laziness can help you make the changes you need to make to be a more effective and energetic person.

2. Find Your Passion for the Work

You started doing what you do for a reason, but sometimes, even the tasks we love the most can become dreary and mundane. When this happens, remind yourself why you started doing it in the first place.

You must have had a passion for it at some point, or you wouldn’t be bothering with it. Remind yourself of the good points of the work, not just the parts that suck.

3. Break up Your Time

People work more efficiently when they have ample rest time. Working in short, focused bursts is far more effective than trying to slog through the task all at once. Not only will you be happier with the end product, but you’ll feel better and more energized after completing it.

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Learn about The Importance of Scheduling Downtime.

4. Look at Ways You Can Do the Task More Efficiently

When possible, work smarter instead of harder.

We’ve already talked about why working hard doesn’t work as well. If you can find a better way to do the task, you’re more likely to enjoy it because you’re not simply performing the task by rote, but rather, using your creativity and imagination to their best effect. This will make you feel better about the job and probably enjoy it more, too.

Try these 12 Ways to Work Smart.

5. Ask for Help or Support

Sometimes, we just need a little extra backup. There’s nothing wrong with asking for help from a more motivated coworker, friend, or family member. This is a useful way to get you up and moving, because they will motivate you to do the task.

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At the same time, you may be doing them a favor by motivating them to work harder. A little friendly competition never hurt anyone!

Learn How to Ask for Help When You’re Afraid To Do So.

6. Think About Why You Don’t Want to Do the Task

This sounds like a rehash of number 1, but it’s really not.

Some jobs we don’t want to do because they’re just not fun. Mowing the lawn, cleaning the house, or getting under the car and replacing the alternator all have one thing in common. People don’t like doing these jobs because they take time and energy, they’re not pleasant, and we know that sooner or later, we’ll just be doing the same thing all over again.

However, instead of thinking about why you don’t want to do the task, think about the benefits. Your car will run better, the Homeowners’ Association won’t be leaving you a nasty gram for the sixth time this month, and your house will look nicer and feel more welcoming.

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By turning a negative into a positive, you’ll find your outlook about these tasks will be more positive too.

7. Force Yourself

Sometimes there’s just no getting around it. All the good advice and wishes in the world won’t make the job look any better. In these cases, you need to remember you’re an intelligent, mature member of Homo Sapiens, and get off your butt.

While it may not be fun at the time, you can look back on the task you did later and say, “Yeah. I did that.” You shouldn’t have to force yourself out of bed every morning (this is a warning sign of depression that you should NOT ignore), but every once in a while, we need to force ourselves to do something we just don’t want to do.

Believe it or not, you’ll be proud of yourself once the task is done.

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Featured photo credit: Kelly Sikkema via unsplash.com

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