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You Can Finish Your Workweeks On Thursday By Doing These 6 Things

You Can Finish Your Workweeks On Thursday By Doing These 6 Things

Do you ever feel like your workweek always drags on while the weekend zips by before you know it? It’s a cruel kind of torture. And it never seems to end.What if there was a way to change the structure of your workweek so that your week flew by and all the hard work was done by Thursday?

Even though we wish we could have every Friday off, wouldn’t it be nice to use your Fridays as a “bonus” day to tackle bigger assignments (that you never have time to get around to) and get a head start on next week?

Yes, it’s seriously doable. Yes, many successful people and companies already use flexible workweeks.[1] And yes, you can do it too if you use your time wisely.

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1. Start with the most important tasks

Start your day by spending the first 90 minutes on your most important task.[2] According to research,[3] the human body functions on cycles called ultradian rhythms. This term refers to 90-120 minute brain cycles that take place when we’re both awake and asleep. This rhythm determines when our body and brain are most energized and when we need some down time. Even if you don’t feel like it, your brain is most active in the morning. This is the best time to do your best and most important work!

2. Setting time boxes increases productivity

Setting a time box for every task we do can help us be more efficient and get more accomplished.[4] Timeboxing assigns a fixed time period to a particular task, increasing productivity. Break down your tasks into 30 minute or hour-long increments. Have a larger task that can’t be completed in a short time period? Break that big boy down into smaller tasks that can be completed in manageable time boxes.

Once you’ve mastered putting each task into a time box throughout your day, increase your productivity even further by shrinking your time boxes! Shoot to complete your task in a shorter time period by shrinking the box by 10% or 20%.

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The trick to successful timeboxing is to work on that task until the deadline for that duty ends. Then, it’s time to move onto the next item on your list. When you set a tight deadline for each different task throughout your day, it motivates you to raise your productivity level and get your work done.

3. Pinpoint three most important tasks

Rather than rattling off a long to-do list of tasks you need to get done for the day, pinpoint the three most important things you need to focus on.[5] Having a long to-do list isn’t a measure of success, especially if you can’t complete the most important tasks on the list. Put these assignments on your calendar so you remember the high-points for each day.

By highlighting the three most important missions every day, you’ll accomplish what matters most on your list. This improves your ability to prioritize. When top priorities are achieved, productivity is accomplished, and your workweek just got shorter.

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4. Find shortcuts to save time

Highly productive people find shortcuts to save time.[6] Now, just be clear, a “shortcut” doesn’t mean sloppy work. We’re talking about time-saving methods for repetitive tasks. There are probably a thousand different ways to save time, but there are a few tried and proven methods that always work. Take a look at your daily routine and pinpoint places where you’re spending a lot of useless time doing repeated tasks.

  • Keep a basic template for repeated emails or documents
  • Let technology do the work for you by scheduling simple daily tasks
  • Generate checklists to streamline work

Even if you make small changes, anything that saves you 10 to 15 minute per day adds up. That’s extra time you can use to be more productive in other areas, all part of the plan to shorten your workload which shortens your workweek.

5. Write a stop doing list

To be more productive, write a stop doing list.[7] What are you going to stop doing that is going to make you successful and more productive? Sometimes, it’s as simple as reducing your time spent doing useless tasks like checking facebook (some studies show that most people spend about 50 minutes every day!)[8]

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If you can take 30 to 60 minutes every day and make it a point to stop doing unproductive tasks, that time adds up to 2-4 hours for a four day workweek. That’s almost half a workday!

6. Post-work routines make you sharper

Have a post-work routine can help you relax and become even sharper the next day.[9] By utilizing a routine after you clock out for the day, you’re giving your body and brain the chance to refocus and regenerate. It’s important for your post-work routine to include some sort of physical activity that involves mental focus like working out, playing your favorite sport, or even playing a game of ping pong or pool.

Doing this type of activity allows your body to relax and destress. Unwinding from the work-day may seem like a waste of time. But by relaxing and taking a mental break, you’re setting yourself up for sharper focus and productivity for your next work day.

Even though these changes might seem insignificant, they really add up. Additionally, putting in longer hours doesn’t always result in more work getting done. After so many hours, our brain shuts down and our ability to work efficiently goes down the drain.In the end, there’s no better way to start your weekend than knowing you dominated your week. Use Monday through Thursday to accomplish your weekly workload, and use Friday to tackle big projects and get a head start on next week. Even if your employer doesn’t support a shortened work week, there’s nothing stopping you from upping your performance and setting yourself up for success.

Reference

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Amanda Light

Wife, Mom, Writer

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Last Updated on November 5, 2020

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. A rut can manifest as a productivity vacuum and be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. Is it possible to learn how to get out of a rut?

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, or a student, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on Small Tasks

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks that have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate positive momentum, which I bring forward to my work.

If you have a large long-term goal you can’t wait to get started on, break it down into smaller objectives first. This will help each piece feel manageable and help you feel like you’re moving closer to your goal.

You can learn more about goals vs objectives here.

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2. Take a Break From Your Work Desk

When you want to learn how to get out of a rut, get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the bathroom, walk around the office, or go out and get a snack. According to research, your productivity is best when you work for 50 minutes to an hour and then take a 15-20 minute break[1].

Your mind may be too bogged down and will need some airing. By walking away from your computer, you may create extra space for new ideas that were hiding behind high stress levels.

3. Upgrade Yourself

Take the down time to upgrade your knowledge and skills. Go to a seminar, read up on a subject of interest, or start learning a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college[2]. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a Friend

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while. Relying on a support system is a great way to work on self-care when you’re learning how to get out of a rut.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget About Trying to Be Perfect

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies. Perfectionism can lead you to fear failure, which can ultimate hinder you even more if you’re trying to find motivation to work on something new.

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If you allow your perfectionism to fade, soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come, and then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Learn more about How Not to Let Perfectionism Secretly Screw You Up.

6. Paint a Vision to Work Towards

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the ultimate goal or vision you have for your life?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action. You can use the power of visualization or even create a vision board if you like to have something to physically remind you of your goals.

7. Read a Book (or Blog)

The things we read are like food for our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great material.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. You can also stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs and follow writers who inspire and motivate you. Find something that interests you and start reading.

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8. Have a Quick Nap

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep[3].

Try a nap if you want to get out of a rut

    One Harvard study found that “whether they took long naps or short naps, participants showed significant improvement on three of the four tests in the study’s cognitive-assessment battery”[4].

    9. Remember Why You Are Doing This

    Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

    What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall your inspiration, and perhaps even journal about it to make it feel more tangible.

    10. Find Some Competition

    When we are learning how to get out of a rut, there’s nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

    Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, and networking conventions can all inspire you to get a move on. However, don’t let this throw you back into your perfectionist tendencies or low self-esteem.

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    11. Go Exercise

    Since you are not making headway at work, you might as well spend the time getting into shape and increasing dopamine levels. Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, or whatever type of exercise helps you start to feel better.

    As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

    If you need ideas for a quick workout, check out the video below:

    12. Take a Few Vacation Days

    If you are stuck in a rut, it’s usually a sign that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

    Beyond the quick tips above, arrange one or two days to take off from work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax, do your favorite activities, and spend time with family members. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

    Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest.

    More Tips to Help You Get out of a Rut

    Featured photo credit: Ashkan Forouzani via unsplash.com

    Reference

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