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7 Effective and Readily-Available Herbal Remedies for Modern Ailments

7 Effective and Readily-Available Herbal Remedies for Modern Ailments

Nowadays, it always seems like everywhere you turn there is someone trying to sell some herbal concoction. From feature-length TV commercials to hyped websites and persuasive email campaigns – herbal supplements[1] form the basis of a highly competitive business environment.

Most of the herbal remedies advertised are often made by combining different exotic herbs that promise to treat everything from a simple cold to things like cancer and diabetes. The herbs will normally originate from some tropical region like Asia or South America and come with hefty price tags.

For the most part, herbal remedies[2] can be effective for a good number of diseases and ailments. However, for many of them, a trip to the tropical jungles of Brazil or India isn’t usually necessary. A good number of these herbs can be found locally and often at a fraction of the price. Check out some of them below.

1. Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera[3] has been used for centuries to treat a wide variety of skin conditions. Egyptians used it over 6,000 years ago as a remedy for sunburn and to help maintain smooth, younger-looking skin. The leaves of the plant can be used to treat wounds, burns, and skin allergies. The plant’s juice is effective against constipation, digestive problems, ulcerative colitis, asthma, diabetes, and other diseases.

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    Best of all, you can grow aloe vera in your yard as long as the plant gets some sun and moist soil.

    2. Ginseng

    Ginseng is a medicinal herb native to North America and parts of Asia. Chinese healers have used ginseng as part of Chinese traditional medicine for centuries, which makes it an important medicinal herb. Ginseng[4] roots are often used to boost immunity, improve blood pressure, increase metabolism, and prevent against some nervous disorders.

      Both American and Asian ginseng seeds can be bought on eBay for most of the year. Most of the seedlings will even come with planting instructions for backyard farmers.

      3. Common Sage

      Sage is a popular herb whose species are used for a wide variety of purposes. For instance, white sage is popular with Native Americans in the US, who use it in traditional ceremonies. Red sage and common sage are mostly used as medicinal herbs, though the common sage is also used for cooking and for ornamental purposes.

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        Common sage is widely available around the world, including in the US.

        4. Cannabis

        Where would the world be without good old weed? The cannabis plant has been at our disposal for centuries until many countries around the world made it illegal in the 1930s. In recent years, however, many countries have made it legal to grow and use for medical purposes.[5] In many states around the US, medical marijuana can be found in marijuana dispensaries across the country. There are even a good number of apps and tools that smokers can use to locate dispensaries, compare prices and strains – all from the comfort of their homes.

          5. Peppermint

          Peppermint is a standard component in many consumable products – from toothpaste, insect repellent, and peppermint oil to chewing gum, mint chocolate, and candy. Peppermint is also a powerful medicinal herb[6] with a long history of use in aromatherapy, folk medicine, and recently as a probable treatment for irritable bowel syndrome.

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            The plant grows quickly and spreads like wildfire in most ecosystems, so there is nothing that stops you from growing your own supply in your backyard.

            6. Milk Thistle

            Milk thistle[7] has been used for centuries to treat problems affecting the liver and the gallbladder. Like many other herbs on this list, milk thistle was originally native to Europe and Asia before becoming popular globally. Milk thistle is popularly used to treat some cancers and liver diseases. It is a potent antioxidant and can be used when conducting a detox from alcohol or drugs.

              7. Marshmallow

              Marshmallow is perhaps more popularly known for the confection marshmallow (made from the roots of the marsh mallow plant) than it is as an herbal remedy. As a medicinal herb, marshmallow[8] is normally very effective at treating ulcers and sore throats. It can also be grown in a wide variety of environments, including your yard – as long as it gets some sun and moisture.

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                Most medicinal herbs, like every other regular plant, will grow in any environment that satisfies their nutrient and sunlight needs. So before you go backpacking through Asia or Europe looking for ancient herbs, always check to see if what you need is available locally or if it can be grown in your yard.

                ____

                Image Credits:

                Aloe Vera, Ginseng, Common Sage, Cannabis, Peppermint, Milk Thistle Via Pixabay, Marsh Mallow Via Maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com

                Featured photo credit: Pixabay via pixabay.com

                Reference

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                Last Updated on January 21, 2020

                The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

                The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

                Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

                your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

                  Why You Need a Vision

                  Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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                  How to Create Your Life Vision

                  Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

                  What Do You Want?

                  The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

                  It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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                  Some tips to guide you:

                  • Remember to ask why you want certain things
                  • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
                  • Give yourself permission to dream.
                  • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
                  • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

                  Some questions to start your exploration:

                  • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
                  • What would you like to have more of in your life?
                  • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
                  • What are your secret passions and dreams?
                  • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
                  • What do you want your relationships to be like?
                  • What qualities would you like to develop?
                  • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
                  • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
                  • What would you most like to accomplish?
                  • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

                  It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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                  What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

                  Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

                  A few prompts to get you started:

                  • What will you have accomplished already?
                  • How will you feel about yourself?
                  • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
                  • What does your ideal day look like?
                  • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
                  • What would you be doing?
                  • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
                  • How are you dressed?
                  • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
                  • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
                  • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

                  It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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                  Plan Backwards

                  It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

                  • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
                  • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
                  • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
                  • What important actions would you have had to take?
                  • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
                  • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
                  • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
                  • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
                  • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

                  Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

                  It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

                  Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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