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Last Updated on December 20, 2019

4 Skills to Help You Read an Entire Book in One Day

4 Skills to Help You Read an Entire Book in One Day

We’ve all been there; we’ve all put off getting required reading done until the day before. Maybe you’re in a book club, or you’re trying to get an entire book read for school the night before. It can be discouraging when you’re flipping through pages trying to figure out how you’re going to get it all done and not forget anything. Don’t think you can’t power through it though: There’s a way you can read an entire book in one day without forgetting everything. Take a look at these tips so you can absorb all that information. Let’s buckle down and get started!

1. Be an active reader

You’ll have a higher chance of remembering the information if you write down a list of questions before you begin reading. You’ll be able to answer the questions as you go and be able to look back and give yourself a refresher if you need it. Even when you’ve finished the book, you can save the answered questions if you ever find that you’ve forgotten some information down the road.

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2. Break up your reading

You may or may not know this, but when you focus on a single task for an extended period of time, you experience something called ego depletion. This will cause your mental energy, self-control, and willpower to essentially wipe out. If you don’t allow yourself to take breaks, your motivation will diminish, which means the probability of finishing that book in a day is low. You have to be able to mix things up.

Set yourself a timer and read for 20 minutes, then take a break and do something that’ll give you some energy for 5-10 minutes. You can go for a walk, listen to music and dance around, do daily exercises, etc. Do whatever you have to do, but make sure it’s going to keep you active so that when you do come back to reading, you feel refreshed.

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Another recommendation is instead of taking breaks, break your book up into sections. Use bookmarks to separate your book into four sections of reading. When you’ve reached your bookmark, give yourself a reward with your favorite snack, video games, or an episode of a show you just can’t seem to stop yourself from watching.

3. Take notes to refresh yourself later

You shouldn’t just be active during your breaks; staying active while reading can keep you focused as well. If you don’t like writing things down, pull out a highlighter and highlight some points throughout so you can go back later and break them up to better retain the information. This can include words you have never seen before, character motives, something you read that makes you feel something emotionally, major plot points, etc.

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If you write or highlight as you go along, you won’t have to try and remember later on when your memory might be a little fuzzy. If you know you’ll have to discuss information in the book or write an essay, you’ll already have information outlined to make it easier on yourself.

It may even be more beneficial for you if you’re able to block out some time to expand your notes. I recommend doing this during a break when you’re having a snack or something. You can look up some of those words you read and weren’t sure of, go back and overlook points you read that stood out to you, and search the internet to get a better understanding of some information you didn’t understand. You may also find that comparing notes to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes can be extremely helpful also.

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4. Find the perfect reading spot

If you think about it, you can pretty much read anywhere. However, you may find that reading just anywhere can be pretty distracting. If you want to finish a book in a day, you’re going to have to find a spot that will keep you focused on your reading. There may be a room in your house that you find most relaxing. Maybe your bedroom with candles lit, or a quiet space that you find really comfortable. Leave your phone in a different room, put in some earplugs, or go to a spot in a library where there won’t be a lot of people. It’s easy to start people watching and lose your focus, so find a place that gives you as much solitude as possible.

More by this author

Erica Wagner

Erica is a passionate writer who shares inspiring ideas and lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on November 6, 2020

How Motor Learning Can Help You Learn Effectively

How Motor Learning Can Help You Learn Effectively

Practice makes perfect. It’s a cliché saying that gets pulled out time and time again. For many, they loath to hear it, but that saying has some truth to it. After all, this saying pops up the most when we are in the midst of motor learning.

While this saying is off, as perfection is impossible, the practice side of it is the only way for us to get closer to that level. And the only way a motor skill can get to that level is through motor learning. It’s through this concept where we can grow the various skills in our lives, but also to learn effectively by learning the right way.

What Is Motor Learning?

To present an example, it’s best to explain what the theory of motor learning is. For starters, it’s been described as such:[1]

“A set of internal processes associated with practice or experience leading to relatively permanent changes in the capability for skilled behavior.”

Our brain responds to sensory information to either practice or experience a certain skill that allows for growth of a motor task or the ability to produce a new motor skill. This happens because our central nervous system changes to allow this to happen in the first place.To see this at work, consider one of the first skills we learned as a human being: walking. While some think toddlers get up and start trying to walk, there are many complex processes at work.

The reason people started to learn to walk was because of motor learning.

At the base stage, we started to walk because months before even trying to take our first steps, we saw how important it was. We witnessed several people walking and understood how helpful it is to walk on two feet.

The 3 Stages of Motor Learning

There is more to motor learning than you might think. Over the years, the learning community has uncovered that there are three stages of motor learning:

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  • Cognitive
  • Associative
  • Autonomous

Each stage has its own requirements for further development and what each stage brings to the learning experience[2].

Motor learning for performance

    Cognitive Stage

    This base stage is where a lot of learning and context happens. At this stage, we’re not overly concerned about how to actually do the skill properly. Instead, we’re more concerned about why we should bother learning the skill.

    Once we’ve got a grasp of that, this stage also starts the trial and error process. You can call it practice, but at this stage, the idea is to at least try it out rather than nail it.

    This is also the stage where we are heavily reliant on guidance. We can have a coach or a teacher there, and their role is to provide a good learning environment. This means removing distractions and using visuals, as well as encouraging those trials and errors to guide the learning process.

    One example of this goes back to the walking example, but other instances are things like driving a car or riding a bike. Even when we are older, you can see this form of learning working.

    Associative Stage

    The second stage is where we’ve got some practice under our belt, and we have a good grasp of general concepts. We know what to do in order to perform this particular skill. The only problem is that we might not be able to do that skill all that well when compared to others.

    Indeed, we know what to do, but not “how to do it well.” It’s at this stage where the saying “Practice makes perfect” rings true. The more that we practice, the more we can refine and tighten the loose ends of that skill.

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    An example of this motor learning at work is seen in sports. Generally speaking, people can perform better the more that they practice. That’s because the more we practice something, the more we understand what input does to our bodies as well as where our current limits lie.

    Autonomous Stage

    At this stage, everything is more or less automatic and will stick in the long term. We can still improve, but you don’t need to tell yourself to go and do a certain task or assignment constantly. Your body has become adjusted to the idea of doing this.

    .

    An example of this learning is the skills that you use at work. When you get to work, you need very little persuasion to actually do your work. Whether that’s writing, lifting, operating a machine, or performing, there are a set of skills that we don’t think about and merely do.

    The Principles of Motor Learning

    The principles of motor learning are few and far between. Generally speaking, there is a consensus that the key to production of a new motor skill isn’t so much on the amount of time spent practicing, but the way that we practice.

    This idea was brought up in a 2016 study published on Science Alert, where scientists uncovered that making changes in your training can enhance your learning experience.[3]

    With this in mind, the core principles focus on the methodology of learning. Not only that, but ensuring they follow through the stages that I mentioned above, which are simple in concept.

    The core principle of this learning is to reinforce a skill so much that our execution of that skill is nothing but mindless consistency.

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    The study that I brought up is a new addition to that principle, as we now know that making alterations during our practice can cause new aspects of learning to grow and enrich our learning and mastery of a skill.

    How to Use Motor Learning Theory For Effective Learning

    The theory as we know it is to practice movement patterns until they become second nature and to experiment and make small changes in order to improve performance of a skill.

    How does all of that help with us being better at something? That study found something called memory reconsolidation.[4] One of the senior study author’s, Pablo A. Celnik, M.D. stated that:

    “What we found is if you practice a slightly modified version of a task you want to master, you actually learn more and faster than if you just keep practicing the exact same thing multiple times in a row.”

    Motor learning through memory reconsolidation

      Celnik also stressed why this is such a big deal:

      “Our results are important because little was known before about how reconsolidation works in relation to motor skill development. This shows how simple manipulations during training can lead to more rapid and larger motor skill gains because of reconsolidation.”

      In other words, by using memory reconsolidation, we can learn faster and ultimately gain the ability to perform a skill faster than by practicing something for several hours without making changes[5].

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      Why does this variation enhance practice? Because the act of recalling our memories isn’t a passive process.[6]

      Whether you are learning a new skill or recalling an event, the sheer act of recalling changes the memory itself. In essence, our memories become highly unreliable as we focus and subtly alter those memories in light of recent events.

      This is because our brain is more interested in the most useful version of the world and disregards useless details.

      Bottom Line

      In order to incorporate motor learning into your life, it’s a matter of mixing up your practice session slightly. Whatever skill it is you are trying to do, urge yourself to make subtle changes to how you perform.

      If you’re writing, try applying a new word you never used previously that you picked up.

      Are you practicing an instrument or playing a sport? Try to use a different muscle or a new movement to achieve the same sound. This can be something as simple as posture or body position.

      The idea with motor learning is to keep practicing, even if you are at the stage where your movements are automatic. This variation can very well bring you to the next level of that skill.

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      Featured photo credit: Jordan Whitfield via unsplash.com

      Reference

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