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Top 10 Indoor Plants for The Winter Season

Top 10 Indoor Plants for The Winter Season

When the temperatures outside are harsh and freezing, there is nothing better than a home full of color and life. Bring nature indoors to reap the benefits of nature’s beauty through every season of the year. Not only do indoor plants provide a natural form of air purification in the home, but they also produce vibrant and inviting colors, setting a mood of relaxation for all to enjoy. Take a look at the top plants for indoor winter gardening.

1. Hibiscus

Hibiscus offers the home a large piece of the tropics during a frosty winter season. Hibiscus is a massive plant. It can grow up to six feet tall, and its flowers can bloom up to eight inches in diameter. Just make sure to keep this plant in the corner window where it will receive plenty of sunlight.

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    2. African Violets

    Though their name suggests a purple hue, African Violets come in several different colors. They are also quite well known for their ability to bloom all year round. The secret to thriving African Violets is to place them in an east-facing window. This flowering foliage will add a bit of humidity to the dry heat produced by most home heating systems.

    3. Peace Lilies

    This low-maintenance, low-light plant is perfect for the novice planter. Peace Lilies are easy to maintain. They require little water and produce an abundance of clean air for breathing. Their glossy leaves and flowers are toxic to pets, so keep Fido away from this gorgeous grower.

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      4. Jasmine

      Jasmine is best known for its sweet aroma. Freshen up the stale air of winter with the pleasant scent of Jasmine. It can be planted in either a pot or a hanging basket, whichever best suits your needs.

      5. Christmas Cactus

      Christmas Cactus enjoys short days and cold temperatures, making it the perfect plant for winter. Keep this flowering beauty in a cool but bright area of the home. When in full bloom, its flowers give the plant the look of a candy cane with its white and red blooms.

      6. Goldfish Plant

      If given enough access to sunlight, the Goldfish Plant will produce vibrant orange flowers throughout the year. Display this plant in a hanging basket. Its hanging limbs, adorned with goldfish-like blooms, resemble a ready-to-reel fishing pole.

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      Goldfish Plant

        7. Begonias

        It is important to remember that not all Begonias are suited for indoor growth. Winter-flowering Begonias are better suited for the indoors because they are innately predisposed to bloom with less sunlight. The longer nights of winter provide cover for the beautiful flowers to bloom.

        8. Kalanchoe

        Kalanchoe is the best plant to grow indoors for those who have zero ability to keep plants alive and healthy. Kalanchoe can tolerate a lot of abuse. It does not need much sunshine or watering. It can almost be left dry throughout the winter season. Overwatering will kill Kalanchoe quickly.

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        9. Cape Primrose

        Streptocarpus, also known as Cape Primrose, is closely related to the African Violet. So much so, that they can both use the same type of fertilizer. Many types of Cape Primrose are highly forgiving to those who are not the best at keeping up with watering.

        Cape Primrose

          10. Bulb Flowers

          Bringing bulb flowers indoors for the winter is a bit of a challenge. This feat is not for the novice gardener. Tulips, Daffodils, Hyacinth, and Iris are all good examples of bulb flowers. Typically, bulbs need up to four months to “chill” in the ground before they produce blooms. This environment would need to be simulated indoors to achieve success, but it is possible. Bulb flowers just take a little more tender, loving care to survive outside of their normal seasons.

          Featured photo credit: Creative Commons via static.pexels.com

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          April Ryder

          Freelance Writer/Nature Enthusiast

          Indoor Plants Top 10 Indoor Plants for The Winter Season Four Hacks to Gain The Upper Hand Over Garden Pests

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          Last Updated on December 2, 2018

          How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

          How to Flow Your Way to a More Productive Life

          Ebb and flow. Contraction and expansion. Highs and lows. It’s all about the cycles of life.

          The entire course of our life follows this up and down pattern of more and then less. Our days flow this way, each following a pattern of more energy, then less energy, more creativity and periods of greater focus bookended by moments of low energy when we cringe at the thought of one more meeting, one more call, one more sentence.

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          The key is in understanding how to use the cycles of ebb and flow to our advantage. The ability to harness these fluctuations, understand how they affect our productivity and mood and then apply that knowledge as a tool to improve our lives is a valuable strategy that few individuals or corporations have mastered.

          Here are a few simple steps to start using this strategy today:

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          Review Your Past Flow

          Take just a few minutes to look back at how your days and weeks have been unfolding. What time of the day are you the most focused? Do you prefer to be more social at certain times of the day? Do you have difficulty concentrating after lunch or are you energized? Are there days when you can’t seem to sit still at your desk and others when you could work on the same project for hours?

          Do you see a pattern starting to emerge? Eventually you will discover a sort of map or schedule that charts your individual productivity levels during a given day or week.  That’s the first step. You’ll use this information to plan your days going forward.

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          Schedule According to Your Flow Pattern

          Look at the types of things you do each day…each week. What can you move around so that it’s a better fit for you? Can you suggest to your team that you schedule meetings for late morning if you can’t stand to be social first thing? Can you schedule detailed project work or highly creative tasks, like writing or designing when you are best able to focus? How about making sales calls or client meetings on days when you are the most social and leaving billing or reports until another time when you are able to close your door and do repetitive tasks.

          Keep in mind that everyone is different and some things are out of our control. Do what you can. You might be surprised at just how flexible clients and managers can be when they understand that improving your productivity will result in better outcomes for them.

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          Account for Big Picture Fluctuations

          Look at the bigger picture. Consider what happens during different months or times during the year. Think about what is going on in the other parts of your life. When is the best time for you to take on a new project, role or responsibility? Take into account other commitments that zap your energy. Do you have a sick parent, a spouse who travels all the time or young children who demand all of your available time and energy?

          We all know people who ignore all of this advice and yet seem to prosper and achieve wonderful success anyway, but they are usually the exception, not the rule. For most of us, this habitual tendency to force our bodies and our brains into patterns of working that undermine our productivity result in achieving less than desired results and adding more stress to our already overburdened lives.

          Why not follow the ebb and flow of your life instead of fighting against it?

            Featured photo credit: Nathan Dumlao via unsplash.com

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