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Five Quick Money Tips for the New Year

Five Quick Money Tips for the New Year

Depending on your point of view, a glance at the calendar these days can elicit one of two responses: relief that 2016 is finally coming to an end, or panic that you have yet to set resolutions for 2017. While goals related to weight loss and health tend to be most popular each year, the hope to get a better hold on finances usually isn’t far behind. If you’re one of the many Americans looking to change their money-wasting ways in the coming year, here are a few quick tips for you.

Have a budget and stick to it.

Perhaps the single biggest personal finance mistake that many of us make is spending without tracking our purchases. Although just striving to keep your bank account in the black may work for a little while, it doesn’t leave room for error, not to mention emergency. That’s why it’s so important to take the time to create a real budget for yourself.

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Luckily, this process has now been made less painful as several apps (e.g. Mint, YNAB, and GoodBudget) allow you to set spending limits and will automatically categorize your purchases for you. Of course, you can always keep a spreadsheet of your own as well or use one as a backup. Lastly, if your addiction to plastic is really getting the best of you, try using the old school envelope method where you put cash (yes, cash) into folders labeled with each category of spending. Once your cash is gone, that’s it. You’ll quickly learn what areas you need to work on.

Up your 401(k) contribution.

With another year over, you are now another year older. Sorry to bum you out but it’s important to consider. Even though retirement might seem like an eternity from now, the truth is that you still need to be saving for it. One of the best ways to do that is by contributing to a 401(k).

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What’s great about 401(k)s is that in many cases your employer will match a certain percentage of the contributions you make and might also offer profit sharing. If you’re not taking advantage of this “free money,” you really should be. In fact, now is a great time to change your withholdings as open enrollment traditionally takes place at the beginning of each year.

Save more on your purchases by planning ahead and getting creative.

Impulse buying can lead not only to some ill-advised purchases but could also cause you to spend more than you need to. There are several ways to save money on the things you buy, but most of them involve planning.

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As someone who visits the mall on a weekly basis, one my favorite ways to save is to find an item I want, set a target price I’d be willing to pay for it, and then wait until it is marked down enough for me to buy. While that may be time-consuming, running a Google search for a coupon code before buying something online is super-fast and oftentimes very effective in helping you reach that important target price. Lastly, don’t forget to be creative and use loyalty offers, credit card rewards, and regular old coupons to your advantage— even all at once!

Start an emergency fund.

Speaking of planning, if 2016 taught us anything, it’s that the unexpected can happen. That’s why having an emergency fund is paramount to ensuring your financial security. Furthermore, in addition to having enough saved up to cover three to six months of essential bills should you lose your job, you might also want to consider having a separate fund for things like car repairs. With these savings in place, you’ll be able to make it through tough financial times without resorting to credit cards. If the worst does happen, you’ll be very thankful you were prepared.

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Consider a side hustle.

Obviously saving money is a big part of personal finance, but so is making money. Luckily, thanks to the Internet, you can now monetize more possessions, talents, goods, and services than ever before. As a result, maybe it’s time you considered pursuing a side hustle of your own. Whether that means blogging about your passions, using some of your free time to drive people around town, selling items you create yourself, or renting/selling items you don’t need, you may be surprised by what you can do and what you could earn. Why not give it a shot?

Happy New Year, everyone — here’s to a great 2017!

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Last Updated on April 3, 2019

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

How to Nix Your Credit Card Debt in Less Than 3 Years

Debt is never a fun thing to be in. But, there are many actions that you can take that will help you rid yourself of the burden of debt once and for all.

By coming up with a set plan, eliminating your debt can feel much easier than constantly thinking about it.

This post will provide some tips on how you can do this to help you nix your credit card debt in less than 3 years.

Hint: there are ways that are easier than you think.

1. Consider Consolidating Multiple Credit Cards If Possible

This may not be applicable to you, but if you have multiple cards – it is something to consider. Keeping up with multiple bills is time consuming.

It will depend on the balance you have on each. Consolidate ones you can but do not do it to the point that you get too close to the maximum limit. Also, it is ideal to pick the card with the lower interest rate.

Consider if there are any fees or alternatively, rewards, with transferring a balance to another card. Watch out for fees. Note that some cards offer rewards for transferring a balance to them. This is extra cash that can help go towards paying off your debt.

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Having one or two cards can make nixing your debt much simpler than keeping up with the balance of a bunch of cards. Keeping track of paying the minimum towards a bunch of cards is time consuming. Spend the time to consolidate instead to make the overall process simpler going forward.

My tip: Have one main credit card. Have a second one that you use for necessities – such as groceries or gas – that offers rewards for those purchases (a lot of cards do) and set the second one on auto-pay. You should be able to pay off a smaller amount on auto-pay if it is a necessity. If you think you cannot, then you may need to cut down a lot on expenses.

Why do I suggest doing this? Having one thing set to auto-pay is one less thing to think about. One less thing to waste time on. Same idea with consolidating to one main card. Tracking down too many is a hassle.

2. Try to Pay the Full Balance You Spent Each Month at the Very Least

You need to pay off the amount you are spending each month when that bill comes in. This is the amount you spent THAT month.

Do not let the debt keep accruing while you work on paying any unpaid debt that has accrued. It will become a never-ending battle. Try as best as you can to be current on paying for each month’s expenses when that month’s bill comes out.

If this is a strain, consider why. You may need to cut expenses. Or you may need to consider other cards. Or look at where this money is going.

3. Pay Extra When You Can – Every Small Amount Counts

This cannot be emphasized enough. If you are looking at a lot of credit card debt, it can look daunting, but each extra amount that you can put towards the debt will really add up – no matter how small it is.

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It does not just reduce the principal amount that you have left to pay off, but it reduces the amount that is collecting interest. You will always save money with that reduced interest.

4. Create a Plan on How to Pay Extra

Back to the main point, having this plan is giving you one less thing to think about.

This plan should be a plan that works for you. If it does not work for you, your spending habits, and your views on debt, then it will not be an effective plan.

For instance, if a set plan of an extra $50 (or another amount that you know you can afford) works for you, then do that. Set that aside every month and pay that extra amount. Treat it like a bill. Choose an amount that works for you and pay it like clockwork as though it was a bill you had to pay each month.

Little amounts will not nix it entirely, but they will help tackle it and having a set plan can make it less of a chore. Creating a new plan of how much to put towards it each month is an unnecessary added stress.

5. Cut out Costs for Services You Do Not Use

If you are signed up for subscriptions that you do not use because of some free trial or for some other reason, cut it out. Your overall financial position will look better.

In turn, that will make cutting your credit card debt easier. Look at your statements to find these expenses. If you do not use them, you may forget you are paying some unnecessary amount each month. Cutting it out can really add up in savings that you can put towards other needed expenses.

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6. Get Aggressive About It

Consider these points:

Depending on the interest and the level of debt, you may need to give up a few indulgences. For example, instead of ordering delivery or going out to eat, cook at home. Everything adds up.

Other things may be more of a sacrifice. It may be a trip you wanted to go on, or a daily latte habit you’ve picked up. In these instances, consider how important it is to you and if it’s worth the sacrifice. And if it is a costly expense, think whether you can wait to indulge.

Cutting an extravagant expense can really help make a dent in your overall debt. Try not to add to debt when you are trying to pay it off. It will be a never-ending battle. Make it less of a battle with these tips and it will feel easier.

Bottom line: Do what you can to make this process easier for you. Implement steps that do this. It takes time now, but will help overall. Also, keep track of your spending and paying down of your debts. Which is the next point.

7. Reevaluate Your Progress at Set Intervals

Doing a regular check-in can help you see your efforts pay off or maybe indicate that you need to give this a bit more effort. If you check every 3-6 months, it will not feel so much like a chore or feel so daunting.

By doing this, you will be able to better understand your progress and perhaps readjust your plan. Bonus: if you see it pay off, it will feel great to do this check-in. You will get there.

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Finally (and most importantly)…

8. Keep Trying

Do not get discouraged. Pushing it off will make it worse. Just keep trying.

Once your debt becomes lower, each monthly payment will reduce the balance more. Why? You are paying less towards interest. It will be a snowball effect eventually and it will become much easier to manage. Just get to that point. And know once you do, it will feel easier and motivating.

Start Knocking out Your Debt Today

The best way to eliminate debt is to get started right away. Begin by implementing the above steps and watch your debt just melt away. Try out some of the above strategies and see what works best for you. Soon you’ll be on your way to a debt free life.

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Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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