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If You Want To Learn Everything More Effectively, You Should Know This Note-Taking Skill

If You Want To Learn Everything More Effectively, You Should Know This Note-Taking Skill

Learning Is More Than Information Storage

Note-taking is an art form unique to the writer.  It is not necessarily always done to enhance your ability to learn new ideas.  But, it is one of the main reasons people take notes today — to learn a new thought or concept – to remember.  However, learning involves more than just committing information for storage in the brain.  Information is meant to be expanded upon and a stellar note-taking method can help add to the existing body of knowledge available in the world today.

We each have a contribution to make to the world.  If you are an avid reader, note-taking can help expand and broaden the ideas covered.  You can add to the body of current intellectual knowledge by taking notes and expanding on what exists.  Or, if you are a student assigned to remember facts and details, note-taking is a mandatory component of the learning experience.

What Are The Problems Of Conventional Note-Taking Approach?

One of the challenges with traditional forms of note taking is when done on a computer.  Although it may seem easier to quickly capture spoken words this way, little, if any, intellectual organization is necessary to record another speaker.  However, when we write out notes, we are forced to organize the thoughts in our head and then place them on paper.  The format one uses to record information varies, but there are specific types of ways to take notes in ways that help us learn more effectively.

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The goal of effective learning is to know the key points of a subject and then broaden the existing base of knowledge through analysis and reflection.  Excellent note-taking skills can help this process unfold.

The Cornell Note-Taking Method

Wichita State University recommends the Cornell Note-Taking Method.  Divided into three parts, each part is utilized during or after a learning session. It is a great way to commit knowledge to memory.  But, it is also an effective method of expanding on the existing body of knowledge.

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    via Lifehacker

    Take a piece of paper and divide it into three parts.  The left column is where the questions to be answered are recorded.  In other words, the lecture or reading for that day is answering a specific question.  That question, and others, can be recorded in this left column to help organize note taking.

    Next, the right side of the left column is where key points and bulleted thoughts are recorded.  What answers are available for the questions offered on the left?  This is where those answers are recorded – on the right-hand side.

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    Finally, the bottom of the page, shaped like a long rectangle, is where the note-taker summarizes what they learned from that day’s reading or lecture.

    The real meat of the learning comes from the bottom of the page.  What are that day’s take-aways?  What new idea or thought can be added to the existing body of knowledge as a result of this particular lecture or reading?  This is how effective learning takes place and knowledge is expanded.

    How This Note-Taking Method Contributes To Effective Learning

    The act of having to process the information written in order to take the note is important.  It is here that more questions can occur and a person’s thought processes are revealed.  This is where real learning takes place as a person’s unique and specific though processes are jarred in order to logically record the note.  In this way, a person’s analytical skills and creativity specific to their style of thinking shines.

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    Note-taking could be considered a form of art.  The ability to focus on someone speaking while logically recording notes is an organizational skill necessary to the learning process.  The Cornell Method of Note-Taking is not just an effective method to record information; it also helps stimulate creativity and produce deeper insights for today’s top-notch scholars.

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    Michelle Owens

    Freelance Writer/Editor

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    Last Updated on November 12, 2020

    15 Reasons Why You Can’t Achieve Your Goals

    15 Reasons Why You Can’t Achieve Your Goals

    The truth about many of our failed goals is that we haven’t achieved them because we didn’t know how to set and accomplish goals effectively, rather than having not had enough willpower, determination, or fortitude. There are strings of mistakes standing in our way of accomplished goals. Fortunately for us, we don’t have to fall victim to these mistakes for 2015. There are many common mistakes we make with setting goals, but there are also surefire ways to fix them too.

    Goal Setting

    1. You make your goals too vague.

    Instead of having a vague goal of “going to the gym,” make your goals specific—something like, “run a mile around the indoor track each morning.”

    2. You have no way of knowing where you are with your goals.

    It’s hard to recognize where you are at reaching your goal if you have no way of measuring where you are with it. Instead, make your goal measurable with questions such as, “how much?” or “how many?” This way, you always know where you stand with your goals.

    3. You make your goals impossible to reach.

    If it’s impossible of reaching, you’re simply not going to reach for it. Sometimes, our past behavior can predict our future behavior, which means if you have no sign of changing a behavior within a week, don’t set a goal that wants to accomplish that. While you can do many things you set your mind to, it’ll be much easier if you realize your capabilities, and judge your goals from there.

    4. You only list your long-term goals.

    Long-term goals tend to fizzle out because we’re stuck on the larger view rather than what we need to accomplish in the here and now to get there. Instead, list out all the short-term goals involved with your long-term goal. For instance, if you want to seek a publisher for a book you’ve written, your short-term goals might involve your marketing your writing and writing for more magazines in order to accomplished your goal of publishing. By listing out the short-term goals involved with your long-term goal, you’ll focus more on doing what’s in front of you.

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    5. You write your goals as negative statements.

    It’s hard to reach a goal that’s worded as, “don’t fall into this stupid trap.” That’s not inspiring, and when you’re first starting out, you need inspiration to stay committed to your goal. Instead, make your goals positive statements, such as, “Be a friend who says yes more” rather than, “Stop being an idiot to your friends.”

    6. You leave your goals in your head.

    Don’t keep your goals stuck in your head. Write them down somewhere and keep them visible. It’s a way making your goals real and holding yourself accountable for achieving them.

    Achieving Goals

    7. You only focus on achieving one goal at a time, and you struggle each time.

    In order to keep achieving your goals, one right after the others, you need to build the healthy habits to do so. For instance, if you want to write a book, developing a habit of writing each morning. If you want to lose weight and eventually run a marathon, develop a habit of running each morning. Focus on buildign habits, and your other goals in the future will come easier.

    Studies show that it takes about 66 days on average to change or develop a habit.[1] If you focus on forming one habit every 66 days, that’ll get you closer to accomplishing your goals, and you’ll also build the capability to achieve more and more goals later on with the help of your newly formed habits.

    8. You live in an environment that doesn’t support your goals.

    Gary Keller and Jay Papasan in their book, The One Thing, state that environments are made up of people and places. They state that these two factors must line up to support your goals. Otherwise, they would cause friction to your goals. So make sure the people who surround you and your location both add something to your goals rather than take away from them.

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    9. You get stuck on the end result with your goals.

    James Clear brilliantly suggests that our focus should be on the systems we implement to reach our goals rather than the actual end result. For instance, if you’re trying to be healthier with your diet, focus more on sticking to your diet plan rather than on your desired end result. It’ll keep you more concentrated on what’s right in front of you rather than what’s up in the sky.

    Keeping Motivated

    10. You get discouraged with your mess-ups.

    When I wake up each morning, I focus all my effort in building a small-win for myself. Why? Because we need confidence and momentum if we want to keep plowing through the obstacles of accomplishing our goals. Starting my day with small wins helps me forget what mess-ups I had yesterday, and be able to reset.

    Your win can be as small as getting out of bed to writing a paragraph in your book. Whatever the case may be, highlight the victories when they come along, and don’t pay much attention to whatever mess-ups happened yesterday.

    11. You downplay your wins.

    When a win comes along, don’t downplay it or be too humble about it. Instead, make it a big deal. Celebrate each time you get closer to your goal with either a party or quality time doing what you love.

    12. You get discouraged by all the work you have to do for your goals.

    What happens when you focus on everything that’s in front of you is that you can lose sight of the big picture—what you’re actually doing this for and why you want to achieve it. By learning how to filter the big picture through your every day small goals, you’ll be able to keep your motivation for the long haul. Never let go of the big picture.

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    13. You waste your downtime.

    When I take a break, I usually fill my downtime with activities that further me toward my goals. For instance, I listen to podcasts about writing or entrepreneurship during my lunch times. This keeps my mind focused on the goal, and also utilizes my downtime with motivation to keep trying for my goals.

    Wondering what you can do during your downtime? Here’re 20 Productive Ways to Use the Time.

    14. You have no system of accountability.

    If you announce your goal publicly, or promise to offer something to people, those people suddenly depend on your accomplishment. They are suddenly concerned for your goals, and help make sure you achieve them. Don’t see this as a burden. Instead, use it to fuel your hard work. Have people depend on you and you’ll be motivated to not let them down.

    15. You fall victim to all your negative behaviors you’re trying to avoid with your goals.

    Instead of making a “to-do” list, make a list of all the behaviors, patterns, and thinking you need to avoid if you ever want to reach your goal. For instance, you might want to chart down, “avoid Netflix” or “don’t think negatively about my capability.” By doing this, you’ll have a visible reminder of all the behavior you need to avoid in order to accomplish your goals. But make sure you balance this list out with your goals listed as positive statements.

    How To Stop Failing Your Goal?

    If you want to stop failing your goal and finally reach it, don’t miss these actionable tips explained by Jade in this episode of The Lifehack Show:

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    Bottom Line

    Overcoming our mistakes is the first step to building healthy systems for our goals. If you find one of these cogs jamming the gears to your goal-setting system, I hope you follow these solutions to keep your system healthy and able to churn out more goals.

    Make this year where you finally achieve what you’ve only dreamed of.

    More Goal Getting Tips

    Featured photo credit: NORTHFOLK via unsplash.com

    Reference

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