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Do Looks Really Matter in Closing Sales and Climbing the Ladder?

Do Looks Really Matter in Closing Sales and Climbing the Ladder?

We often hear that it doesn’t matter what you look like, it’s what’s on the inside that counts. However, such conventional wisdom may not always apply in the workplace. Studies indicate that your physical appearance can have a significant impact on your choice of career and professional advancement.

People of all ages, from schoolchildren to office workers, are perceived based on their looks, notes researcher and author on physical attractiveness, Dr. Gordon L Patzer.[1] “What you look like—or, more importantly, how your looks are perceived (by others and by yourself)—shapes your life in dozens of subtle and not so subtle ways from cradle to grave,” says Dr. Patzer. In his studies, he illustrates this with examples of cuter newborns, who will be embraced more, and fifth-graders who are treated more leniently by their teachers because they have more pleasing facial features.

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Similar trends can be observed in the workplace. Unsurprisingly, women often feel stronger pressure than men to maintain an attractive appearance. A study conducted in 2005[2] by sociologists at NYU found that if a woman gains a noticeable amount of weight, she is likely to see a decrease in her earnings as well as in her professional status. This is less often the case for men, with whom society is much more forgiving.

According to this study, “body mass is also associated with a reduction in a woman’s likelihood of marriage, her spouse’s occupational prestige, and her spouse’s earnings. However, consistent with past research, men experience no negative effects of body mass on economic outcomes. Age splits show that it is among younger adults where BMI effects are most robust, lending support to the interpretation that it is BMI causing occupational outcomes and not the reverse.”

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Inversely, women will sometimes find that being too attractive can hinder their professional advancement. The same study notes that women who are deemed “too attractive” are not taken seriously, and viewed with suspicion by both their male and female colleagues. There is no way to gauge the ideal level of attractiveness, but it is evident that from an early age and throughout their careers, women are held to much higher levels of scrutiny than men.

One challenge that both men and women share is aging – older workers in certain fields must compete with younger people whose naturally youthful appearances make them seem more qualified to keep up with current trends in technology and business. For more mature professionals, that can mean going under the knife. While cosmetic surgery has long been considered the sole preserve of Hollywood superstars, the popularity of surgical and minimally invasive procedures has risen significantly over the past years. Botox, for instance, has seen a 335% rise in popularity[3] among men since the year 2000.

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Cosmetic surgery is not a cheap endeavor, costing tens of thousands of dollars for certain procedures. However, if spending lots of money now could mean making more money in the future, then it’s not much of a surprise that people are willing to take that financial risk. “The competitive job market is often cited as the main motivating factor for men to get plastic surgery,” says Dr. Douglas Steinbrech,[4] a New York plastic surgeon who caters to a predominantly male clientele. “Men are definitely paying more attention and investing more into their appearance than before. In order of popularity, they are lining up for nose jobs, eyelid surgery, breast reduction (gynecomastia), liposuction, and face-lifts. Men now account for more than 10 percent of plastic surgery patients.”

They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but with proper grooming he can still win prizes.

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Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

Reference

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Chris Barry

freelance writer

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Last Updated on August 10, 2020

10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed

10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed

Regardless of your background, times today are tough. While uneven economies around the world have made it incredibly difficult for many people to find work, the recent COVID pandemic has made things worse.

Regardless of age and qualification, stretches of unemployment have affected us all in recent years. While we might not be able to control being unemployed, we can control how we react to it.

Despite difficult conditions, there are many ways to grow and stay hopeful. Whether you’re looking for work, or just taking a breather between assignments, these 10 endeavors will keep you busy and productive. Plus, some may even help push your resume to the top of the next pile.

Here’re 10 things you should do when you’re unemployed:

1. Keep a Schedule

It’s fine to take a few days after you’re finished at work to relax, but try not to get too comfortable.

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As welcoming as permanently moving into your sweatpants may seem, keeping a schedule is one way to stay productive and focused. While unemployed, if you continue to start your day early, you are more likely to get more done. Also, keeping up with day to day tasks makes you less likely to grow depressed or inactive.

2. Join a Temp Agency

One of the easiest ways to bridge the gap between jobs is to find temporary work, or work with a temp agency. While many unemployed people job hunt religiously, rememberer to include temp agencies in the search.

While not a permanent solution, you will be in a better position financially while you search for something permanent.

3. Work Online

Another great option if you’re unemployed is online work. Many different sites offer a variety of ways to make money online, but make sure the site you’re working for is reputable.

Micro job sites such as Fiverr and Upwork as well as sites that pay for you to take surveys, are all quick, legitimate options. While these sites sometimes offer lower pay, it’s always better to move forward slowly than not at all.

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Here’s How to Find and Land a Legit Online Work from Home Job.

4. Get Organized

Unemployment is an excellent opportunity to get organized. Embark on some spring cleaning, go through old boxes, and get rid of the things you don’t need. Streamlining your life will help you dive head first into the next chapter, plus it helps you feel like your unemployed time is spent productively.

Try these tips: How to Organize Your Life: 10 Habits of Really Organized People

5. Exercise

Much like organizing your life, another good way to keep yourself enthusiastic and healthy is to exercise. It doesn’t take much to get slightly more active, and exercise can help you stay positive. Even a walk around the block a few times a week can do a lot for keeping you motivated and determined. If you take care of yourself, you can make the most of this extra time.

6. Volunteer

Volunteering is an excellent way to use extra time when you’re unemployed. Additionally, if you volunteer in an area related to your job qualifications, you can often include the experience on your resume.

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Not only that, doing good is a true mood booster and is sure to help you stay optimistic while looking for your next job.

7. Improve Your Skills

Looking for ways to increase your job skills while unemployed is a good way to move forward as well. Look for certifications or training you could take, especially those offered for free.

You can qualify more for even entry level positions with extra training in your line of work, and many cities or states offer job skills training. Refreshing your resume, and interview and job skills may make your job hunt easier.

8. Treat Yourself

Unemployment can be trying and tiring, so don’t forget to treat yourself occasionally. Take a reasonable amount of time off from your weekly job hunt to recharge and rest up. Letting yourself rest will maximize your productivity during the hours you job search.

Even if you don’t have extra money for entertainment, a walk or visit to the park can do wonders to help you go back and attack your job hunt.

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9. See What You Can Sell

Another good way to bridge the gap between jobs is to sell unused possessions. eBay and Amazon are both secure sites, but traditional garage sales are a fine option too. Sell off a few video games, or some electronics, for some quick and easy cash while you figure out a permanent solution.

10. Take a Course

Much like training and certifications, taking a class can be a good way to keep yourself sharp while unemployed. Especially when you’re between jobs, it can be easy to forget this option, as most courses cost money. Don’t forget the mass of free educational tools online: 25 Killer Sites For Free Online Education

Keeping your brain sharp can help you stay focused and may even help you learn some new, relevant job skills.

The Bottom Line

While unemployment numbers are still high, there are many things you can do to better yourself and move forward. While new skills to aid your job hung might seem out of reach, there are plenty of free ways to get ahead, online and off.

Additionally, don’t forget that taking time for yourself can do wonders for keeping you productive in your job hunt. While it is a challenge, don’t give up–being unemployed can offer you extra time to better yourself, and possibly grow more qualified to find work.

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Featured photo credit: neONBRAND via unsplash.com

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