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6 Things To Consider Before You Travel

6 Things To Consider Before You Travel

I love traveling, but sometimes it can be stressful, especially the planning. However, in the grand scheme of things, the planning makes the rest of it seem a lot less stressful.

Before you go anywhere, you should look into things like flights, climate, your budget, and things to do. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. If you’re serious about traveling, here are 6 more things you should consider before traveling:

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1. Currency

Exchange rates are definitely one of the things you should keep an eye on. It’s also a good idea to figure out the conversion rate before you go. One of the biggest money mistakes travelers make is exchanging their money for foreign currency before they reach their intended destination. Because of exchange rates, you actually lose some money if you buy from your bank and even more, if you exchange while at the airport. You’ll most likely get the best rate if you use the ATM when you arrive in your travel location.

Also, remember to inform your bank that you’ll be traveling so they can place a travel alert on your account. This will prevent any temporary holds/freezes on your account due to any spending they perceive to be suspicious.

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2. Mode of Transportation

How are you going to get around once you’re there? Depending on the country you’re in, taxis might not be the best idea. If you need to travel longer distances, it might be best to rent a car, in which case you should look into different companies and rates. If you’re backpacking and/or traveling between different countries in Europe, you may want to go for a Railpass. Also, keep in mind that some locations (like Hawaii) might require short flights between islands and others might have water-travel, such as ferries.

3. Accommodations

There are a lot of options when it comes to finding a place to stay. Depending on your style, or the kind of traveling you want to do, there are hotels and Bed-and-Breakfasts. For those of you looking for a different experience, lower price, or perhaps a longer stay in a more private or remote accommodation, there are always hostels and sites like Airbnb or CouchSurfing that offer short-term lodging in residential properties. If you’re housesitting or WWOOFing, make sure you’re comfortable with where you’re going. Wherever you choose to lay your head, do your research.

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4. Electronics

Unless you’re traveling in the U.S. or Puerto Rico, or going off the grid, you’ll probably need an adapter to charge your electronics. And depending on your phone coverage and/or plan, you might want to get a prepaid phone card for international calls. Otherwise, wifi might be your friend for communicating with people back home.

5. Culture

Before you head out, do your research on the different customs (the do’s and don’ts) of the country you’re traveling to. For instance, what percentage do they typically tip? Are there certain gestures, words, or actions that might be considered offensive that are different from the US? Are there different laws? Are there common tourist scams? Will there be any cultural events while you’re there? There are a lot of things you might not even think of, but it’s simple enough to research “do’s and don’ts” infographics on different countries for that information.

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6. Travel Insurance

Yes, this is a thing. Travel insurance exists for things like injury or illness while traveling, trip cancellations, baggage loss or theft, and many other things. Getting travel insurance isn’t required, but it is a good idea, so again—do your research!

Even though half the fun of travel is the unexpected, I’m a firm believer that you should always be prepared for as much as possible. If you’re having trouble planning, try to talk to a travel agent or someone you know that’s experienced in traveling. Whether you’re traveling domestically or abroad, it’s good to cover the basics, plus a little bit more. The unexpected will likely still happen, but it’ll be worth it.

Featured photo credit: Ed Gregory via stokpic.com

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

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