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12 Tricks That Make You The Master Of Google Search

12 Tricks That Make You The Master Of Google Search

There’s a hidden side of Google that only a select few people take advantage of. When you discover the amazing things you can do with Google, you’ll become a search master. You’ll be light years ahead of the people who don’t know this stuff.

Enough talking – let’s get right to learning the 12 Google search tricks. Are you ready to have your mind blown?

1. Use an asterisk “*” to find words or phrases you can’t remember

Google sees an * as a missing word they should fill in with the most relevant result. So, if you forgot a word in a phrase or saying, you can use it to find the phrase with the word you’re missing.

Google Search Tricks: Asterisk to find missing words

    2. Search within websites using “site:”

    For example, if you search “site: lifehack.org exercises” it will bring up every page on Lifehack with the word exercises in it.

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    Google Search Tricks: Using "site:" parameter

      3. Find similar websites by searching “related:yourwebsitehere.com”

      If you have a blog or website you really like and want to find similar sites, you can make a search like “related:lifehack.org”:

        4. Search for exact phrases using quotations

        If you want to find things with exact words or phrases, just put quotes around them. For example, you can search for “shining your kitchen sink”:

          5. Exclude certain keywords using “-“

          Sometimes you want to find results without certain words. You can do so using the minus sign followed by the word. For example, you can search “jaguar speed -car”:

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            6. Find links to certain websites with “link:yourwebsitehere.com”

            If you want to see any websites that linked to a certain website or page, you can search using the “link:” parameter. This could be useful if you’re looking for sites that linked back to your site, or even your Facebook page.

              7. Search for exact images

              Have you ever wondered where an image came from or wanted to find similar images to yours? All you have to do is download the image you want to search for, go to images.google.com, click the camera icon, then upload your image (or paste the image URL). It will bring up related images, the same image in different sizes, and show the sources for the image!

                8. Use “or” when you can’t remember which topic you’re thinking of

                If you can’t remember which Jennifer acted in that one movie, for example:

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                Which actor was it again?

                  9. Search within a time frame using “…”

                  For example, if you search “inventions 1900…2000”, you’ll find posts with inventions in that time frame:

                    10. Search for specific words in a title or URL using “intitle:” and “inurl:”

                    If you want to find a forum, you can search “inurl:forum”. If you want to find articles with exact works in the title, you can search “intitle:kittens”.

                      11. Use “Define:” to learn the meaning of slang words

                      This is awesome. If you ever hear or see a slang word you don’t understand, just Google “Define:slangword”. For example, when you search “define:waffle”:

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                        12. Filter search results using Google’s “Search Tools”

                        Finally, one of the most well-known ways of increasing your efficiency on Google is their search tools dropdown. This dropdown can allow you to filter results by time date, image size, color, type, etc. It’s an under-utilized way to narrow down your search results.

                          There you have it – 12 Google search tricks to make you a Google search master. If you want more cool Google tricks or a handy place to find the parameters, Google has an excellent help document that shows you the most advanced ways to use their platform.

                          Now get out there and start using your newfound magical search powers to conquer the world! Or at least, to find better search results. Either way, I hope you found this article helpful. If you did, don’t forget to share it!

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                          Bill Widmer

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                          Last Updated on May 14, 2019

                          8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                          8 Replacements for Google Notebook

                          Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

                          1. Zoho Notebook
                            If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
                          2. Evernote
                            The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
                          3. Net Notes
                            If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
                          4. i-Lighter
                            You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
                          5. Clipmarks
                            For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
                          6. UberNote
                            If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
                          7. iLeonardo
                            iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
                          8. Zotero
                            Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

                          I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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                          In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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