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Nutritionists And Americans Have Different Views On The Nutritional Value Of Common Foods

Nutritionists And Americans Have Different Views On The Nutritional Value Of Common Foods

French fries, bacon, chips, soda and chocolate bars are all poor food choices. We all know this. However, being able to decipher what is good for you and what isn’t–isn’t always so obvious. In fact, the New York Times recently published an article in which both average Americans and nutrition experts were polled on which of the 52 foods presented were good for you and which you should avoid. The results were all over the place. The general public’s views on which foods were healthy and which were not varied greatly from that of the experts on some food choices, but even more surprising was the fact that even the experts could not come to a consensus on quite a few food choices.

The public’s view of nutrient rich foods

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    The largest disparity uncovered by the poll was with granola bars. Are they healthy or not? Seventy-one percent of the public placed granola bars in the ‘nutrient rich foods’ category while only 28% of nutritionists did. Regular people tend to consider the nutritional value and fat content only when sorting foods into the ‘healthy’ and ‘unhealthy’ categories while food experts tend to have a broader perspective and include things like sugar and sodium content in their decisions.  And for that reason, coconut oil, frozen yogurt, SlimFast shakes and orange juice topped the general public’s list of healthy but barely made it on the list of the experts.

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      Foods like sushi, humus, wine and shrimp were deemed healthy by the experts but the survey showed that while most of the Americans polled saw them as somewhat healthy, overall, they didn’t rank them quite as high. This fact leads the polling experts to believe that the media plays an enormous role in how the general public makes their food choices. Shrimp, for example, has received its fair share of bad press due to its high levels of cholesterol. Modern media shapes public opinion on many things–including healthy eating.

      Disparities among the experts concerning nutrient rich foods

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        Experts opinions diverged the most when it came to steak, cheddar cheese, whole milk and pork chops. These are nutrient rich foods but the are high in saturated fat. Previously, it was common knowledge that fat–particularly saturated fat should be avoided at all costs. More recent studies render mixed views on the subject and experts are still grappling with the question if these food should be avoided or if they are indeed healthy.

        Choosing foods that are good for you

        The Federal Drug Administration(FDA) is currently updating its standards on which foods it deems healthy in light of new research concerning what our bodies need. This move underscores the notion that finding foods that are truly healthy is, at best, a moving target. Here are 3 easy things you can do to simplify the process of making healthy food choices and remove some of the frustrating guess work:

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        • Know your body and your own health needs. Understanding your health needs and choosing foods that work well with your body’s chemistry is key. Even though shrimp made the experts’ list of nutrient rich foods, if you have problems with cholesterol you may want to think twice before adding significant amounts of it to your diet. Being aware of your genetic makeup, the health history of your family, any predispositions to certain illnesses and your blood type all are key factors in how your body responds to and interacts with the foods you eat.
        • KISS–“Keep it simple silly.” This saying definitely applies when it comes to your diet. Don’t overthink it. There are a few (and I do mean few) rules that you should follow when it comes to what you put in your body. The first is the less processed the better. Eating foods in their natural state with minimal additions of chemicals and manipulation is always a good idea. The second hard and fast rule is eat your greens. No matter who you talk to, the message is the same, leafy greens are the way to go. Adding leafy greens to your diet will have positive impacts on your overall health.
        • Moderation is key. Eliminating entire food groups from your diet is never a good idea. Protein, complex carbohydrates and fats all play a role in keeping our bodies operating optimally. The key to healthy eating for both the body and the mind is to use moderation.

        Food fads come and go, but the facts are clear: everyone does not have the same basic nutritional needs. We all know someone who is a strict vegetarian and their body thrives on that diet, while others swear by Atkins or similar low-carb plans however, those types of diets may not work for you. Get to know yourself and tailor your diet to your own individual needs.

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        Denise Hill

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        Last Updated on January 21, 2020

        The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

        The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

        Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

        your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

          Why You Need a Vision

          Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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          How to Create Your Life Vision

          Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

          What Do You Want?

          The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

          It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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          Some tips to guide you:

          • Remember to ask why you want certain things
          • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
          • Give yourself permission to dream.
          • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
          • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

          Some questions to start your exploration:

          • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
          • What would you like to have more of in your life?
          • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
          • What are your secret passions and dreams?
          • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
          • What do you want your relationships to be like?
          • What qualities would you like to develop?
          • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
          • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
          • What would you most like to accomplish?
          • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

          It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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          What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

          Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

          A few prompts to get you started:

          • What will you have accomplished already?
          • How will you feel about yourself?
          • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
          • What does your ideal day look like?
          • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
          • What would you be doing?
          • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
          • How are you dressed?
          • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
          • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
          • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

          It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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          Plan Backwards

          It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

          • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
          • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
          • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
          • What important actions would you have had to take?
          • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
          • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
          • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
          • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
          • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

          Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

          It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

          Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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