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6 Signs You Are Better At Money Management Than You Think You Are

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6 Signs You Are Better At Money Management Than You Think You Are

We know millennials have a strange relationship with money, not only because they lack them, but also because they grew up seeing the effects of economic hardships on a strong nation. The simple thought of money is enough to make millennials’ heads ache. They have a huge debt for their studies, they have no perspective of buying their own house, they have troubles landing a good job and many of them are forced to move back with their parents, when they can’t afford to pay the rent. This is why crowdfunding for your wedding is now millennials’ only option for affording a wedding.

As a millennial myself, I know how shattering it can be to wonder how are you going to live in retirement years or what will happen if you get fired.

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But experts in finances say you are probably better at money management than you think you are, if you are doing these things. I know I read this list breathlessly and I rejoiced at the end, when I realized I had checked multiple items off the list. I hope you will also score well!

1.You think about saving for retirement

As millennials are now in their 20s-30s, we have a lot of time until retirement. If you are thinking of your retirement years, despite this, you are on the good path towards proper adulthood/money management thing. According to money management expert Holly Perez, take advantage of your 401K and look for opportunities to maximize your savings, as well as finding reductions for your taxable income. You use recurring payments for the monthly bills

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In order to keep your credit score high, it’s very important to pay your bills on time. The most convenient way to do it is activating your recurring payments option. This way, you won’t need to remember paying the bills, as the bank will do it for you, automatically. If you are using this option, your financial status is not endangered by delays in payments and you are able to live off the rest of your money. The best time to set the automatic payments is right after payday, when your account has enough resources.

3. You also made automatic payments to your savings account

One of the best ways to ensure you do get to save money for your retirement fund is setting up automatic payments to your savings account. You can do this online, via online banking, at the end of each month, after you’ve paid for all the bills and groceries. If you are afraid you are not going to do this each month, ask your employer to direct part of your pay towards your savings account. For those of you who don’t like either of these options, simply set up another automatic payment, just like you did for your bills. If you already direct money to your savings, you know this is a great way to prevent overspending.

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4. You use financial apps and you value safe banking

If you are using financial apps to know the status of your account at any time, you are on the right track. People who are proficient in money management never leave their accounts to fate: they use financial and budgeting apps or strategies to make sure every dollar is spent wisely.

5. You are using your credit and debit cards wisely

All the previous things do suggest you are using your credit and debit cards wise, but this is so important, I had to reinforce it. Having a credit card and using it at providers who accept credit cards is a good thing, as it helps you build your credit history. This will enable you to get loans and benefits from low interest rates. However, you need to make sure you are not keeping debt on your cards!

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6. You have an emergency fund

The ultimate sign you are doing good is having an emergency fund. When you have to pay for something unexpected, you won’t have to take a loan, rely on crowdfunding or borrow money, which is going to make saving almost mission impossible. Having an emergency fund allows you to have peace of mind, as well as a base for future savings.

You don’t have to have millions of dollars in hidden, offshore accounts, in order to be financially stable. Money management is about knowing how to handle the payments and make the most out of your monthly revenue. If you recognized yourself in any of these signs, you’re more financially-savvy than you think you are, so congrats!

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Featured photo credit: Good Vibrations Images/Elitedaily via cdn29.elitedaily.com

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Last Updated on January 5, 2022

33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

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33 Painless Ways to Save Money Now

In a difficult economy, most of us are looking for ways to put more money in our pockets, but we don’t want to feel like misers. We don’t want to drastically alter our lifestyles either. We want it fast and we want it easy. Small savings can add up and big savings can feel like winning the lottery, just without all of the taxes.

Some easy ways to save money:

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  1. Online rebate sites. Many online sites offer cash back rebates and online coupons as well. MrRebates and Ebates are two I like, but there are many others.
  2. Sign up for customer rewards. Many of your favorite stores offer customer rewards on products you already buy. Take advantage.
  3. Switch to compact fluorescent bulbs. The extra cost up front is worth the energy savings later on.
  4. Turn off power strips and electronic devices when not in use.
  5. Buy a programmable thermostat. Set it to lower the heat or raise the AC when you’re not home.
  6. Make coffee at home. Those lattes and caramel macchiatos add up to quite a bit of dough over the year.
  7. Switch banks. Shop around for better interest rates, lower fees and better customer perks. Don’t forget to look for free online banking and ease of depositing and withdrawing money.
  8. Clip coupons: Saving a couple dollars here and there can start to add up. As long as you’re going to buy the products anyway, why not save money?
  9. Pack your lunch. Bring your lunch to work with you a few days a week, rather than buy it.
  10. Eat at home. We’re busier than ever, but cooking meals at home is healthier and much cheaper than take-out or going out. Plus, with all of the freezer and pre-made options, it’s almost as fast as drive-thru.
  11. Have leftovers night. Save your leftovers from a few meals and have a “leftover dinner.” It’s a free meal!
  12. Buy store brands: Many generic or store brands are actually just as good as name brands and considerably cheaper.
  13. Ditch bottled water. Drink tap water if it’s good quality, buy a filter if it’s not. Get 
      a reusable water bottle and refill it.
    • Avoid vending machines: The items are usually over-priced.
    • Take in a matinee. Afternoon movie showings are cheaper than evening times.
    • Re-examine your cable bill. Cancel extra cable or satellite channels you don’t watch. Watch the “on demand” movie purchases too.
    • Use online bill pay. Most banks offer free online bill paying. Save on stamps and checks, and avoid late fees by automating bill payment.
    • Buy frequently used items in bulk. You get a lower per item price and eliminate extra trips to the store later on.
    • Fully utilize the library. Borrowing books is much cheaper than buying them, but in addition to books, most local libraries now lend movies and games.
    • Cancel magazine/newspaper subscriptions: Re-evaluate your subscriptions. Cancel those you don’t read and consider reading some of the other publications online.
    • Get rid of your land-line. Do you really need a land-line anymore if everyone in the family has a cell phone? Alternatively, look into using VOIP or getting a cheaper plan.
    • Better fuel efficiency. Check the air pressure in your tires, keep up with proper auto maintenance, and slow down. Driving even 5MPH slower will result in better fuel mileage.
    • Increase your deductibles. Increasing the insurance deductibles on your homeowners and auto insurance policies lowers premiums significantly. Just make sure you choose a deductible that you can afford should an emergency happen.
    • Choose lunch over dinner. If you do want to dine out occasionally, go at lunchtime rather than dinnertime. Lunch prices are usually cheaper.
    • Buy used:  Whether it’s something small like a vintage dress or a video game or something big like a car or furniture, consider buying it used. You can often get “nearly new” for a fraction of the cost.
    • Stick to the list. Make a list before you go shopping and don’t buy anything that’s not on the list unless it’s a once in a lifetime, killer deal.
    • Tame the impulse. Use a self-enforced waiting period whenever you’re tempted to make an unplanned purchase. Wait for a week and see if you still want the item.
    • Don’t be afraid to ask. Ask to have fees waived, ask for a discount, ask for a lower interest rate on your credit card.
    • Repair rather than replace. You can find directions on how to fix almost anything on the internet. Do your homework, and then bring out your inner handyman.
    • Trade with your neighbors. Borrow tools or equipment that you use infrequently and swap things like babysitting with your neighbors.
    • Swap online. Use sites like PaperBack Swap to trade books, music, and movies with others online. Also, look for local community sites like Freecycle where people give away items they no longer need.
    • Cut back on the meat. Try eating a one or two meatless meals every week or cut back on the meat portions. Meat is usually the most expensive part of the meal.
    • Comparison shop: Get in the habit of checking prices before you buy. See if you can get a better price at another store or look online.

    Remember that saving money is not about being cheap or stingy; it’s about putting money into your bank account rather than giving it to someone else. There are many ways to save money, some you’ve never thought of, and some that won’t appeal or apply to you. Just pick a few of the ideas that sound doable and watch the savings add up. Save big, save small, but save wherever you can.

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    Featured photo credit: Damir Spanic via unsplash.com

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