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11 Ways to Impress Employers and Network with Your Professionalism

11 Ways to Impress Employers and Network with Your Professionalism

It is no longer good enough to be present. You must be impressive. Otherwise, judgment on your professionalism creates distance, not association. In today’s social climate, everything has a professional undertone. Meetings with friends, play dates with other parents and children, or visiting with friends often require an appointment. There are many layers to people’s lives today. You’re expected to respect other’s time and at least acknowledge the effort to help.

Don’t be the last to understand a certain person is unapproachable. Even our closest friends have layers of relationships requiring different rules of engagement for each layer. Your professional network expects the same from you in understanding each person is different. You must do more than just capture attention. Your presence must move them to act. You must impress them to be memorable, and “wow” them to want to associate with you.

Employers have rules of engagement too. Since video recording and the spirit of transparency reigns today, unprofessionalism is noted. You don’t want to be THAT man or woman who mistreats, misquotes, or misappropriates anything. Employers are looking. Your network is looking.

I noticed these 11 attributes from people who exude professionalism. Be sure these are a part of your communication and overall presentation:

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1. You are direct

Your voice in writing and presentation speaks much louder, and your actions yell as either a fan at a sporting event or as an antagonist at a political rally. If people are guessing what you’re asking or responding to, then the respect you expect will dissipate.

2. You remember names

Forgetting a name is an awful habit. If you met the person more than twice, this could change the game for you in all of the wrong ways. Not to mention it says how much you care about the individual. It is hard if you’re meeting many people when starting a new job.

But if you don’t have the job yet, you’re obstructing your efforts. I would highly recommend Jerry Lucas, Dr. Memory series, notably the remembering names series. Don’t be fooled, forgetting names is an employment stumbling block. Remember: Professionalism is the end result. You will be remembered for not being interested if you forget names.

3. Temperance

As a job seeker, you are at the mercy of everyone and his godfather. Signs of impatience and petulance could disqualify you – it’s your personal smoking gun. Even if your face scrunched as it’s ready to be boxed is seen, it is a turn-off, and your non-verbal or verbal angst is considered to be bratty or self-entitled. Take the edge off as much as you can. Ask coworkers or people you know how do you come across in business situations.

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4. Answer the phone with tact

We might be talking about phone etiquette here, but it is important to tactfully and respectfully answer calls professionally. People are still surprised and enchanted when speaking to someone who is trying to impress them (without regards to position). Even if the caller is agitated, our voice, tone and wordings can diffuse the bomb before it blows, if we’re tactful and respectful.

5. Each person is important

Treating the secretary as if he or she is the CEO is a powerful tool. Don’t think it doesn’t impress the people who interview you. If executed well, more opportunities will increase your engagement with people and encourage a conversation rather than an interrogation.

6. Timing is everything

What you say is important, but when you say it could be the difference between being a professional or disrespectful. You learn when to talk about salary and perks because sooner than later is not a good strategy. If something bothers you about a part of the hiring process, it matters when and who you talk to. It is wise not to speak with anyone about it when you don’t have all of the information.

7. Clarity in everything

You must clearly communicate in every phase with everyone involved in your hiring process (essentially it’s everyone you meet). Typical communication mishaps are unfinished thoughts, bad grammar, unclear speech or dialect, and many times lack eye contact. Professionalism is also seeking clarity. Questions show enthusiasm and interest.

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Some of it is culture related, but when you struggle with clarity you can always:

– Repeat what you said in a slightly different way
– Ask the person if what you said was clear (with a humble attitude)
– Provide a follow-up email to significant conversations

8. Punctual

Being late for meetings, events, and even phone calls can leave a bad taste in anyone’s mouth. Coffee, lunch, scheduled phone calls and casual meet-ups count as much like job interviews even if it is with a colleague. When you’re on time, excellence can be assumed or at minimum care about the work at hand.

9. Allowing accountability

It’s more important to have self-accountability, but providing an option for people to follow-up empowers them. The trick is for them to find it unnecessary because you want to show out. Offering transparency creates trust and faith in your abilities, but it also shows you don’t mind putting your reputation to your work.

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10. You’re honest with your mistakes

No one expects you to confess your sins in a public way, but how you respond to others mistakes says a lot about you. Empathy helps when others can feel through experience by walking in their shoes. Mistakes are human, and handling gaffes with grace and tact seal your authenticity and professionalism.

11. Your social updates are thoughtfully and carefully crafted

If you have an acute sense of humor, it doesn’t mean you have to be serious. I think even comedians who are known for their brash humor add context to their stories. Without context, we’re all vulnerable to incessant criticism and misunderstanding. Therefore, your attempts to connect with your network are futile without clarity and context.

Every interaction counts during your job search and as you advance in your career. Whether people view you from far away, online, or shaking hands with you, no one should doubt your professionalism. I just mention a few ways to be professional, but there are more. Mainly, you want people to rave about you after you leave the room.

Featured photo credit: www.insidehighered.com via insidehighered.com

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11 Ways to Impress Employers and Network with Your Professionalism

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Last Updated on November 9, 2020

How to Become Goal Oriented and Achieve More in Life

How to Become Goal Oriented and Achieve More in Life

Why is it important to be goal-oriented? If you make goals without asking yourself what your true strengths and values are first, you could put yourself on the fast track to disappointment. On the other hand, if you don’t set any intentions at all, you could bounce through life like a pinball doing what others want without accomplishing what’s really important to you.

Fear not. Here are 8 powerful ways to be goal-oriented using the ENVISION method (Endgame – Nesting – Value – Inspiration – Superpowers – Intimates – Openness – Nourishment) that will help you create a successful, meaningful life:

1. Start With the End in Mind

To ensure that you make goals that matter, stand back and examine your life from a broader perspective. Think about the happy ending you would like to achieve, the “E” in ENVISION, and work backwards to determine how you’ll get there.

For example, if you’d like to generate goals for yourself over the next five years, write down where you’d like to be professionally and personally five years from now.

Where do you see yourself in relation to work? What’s your family life like? What type of friends and social support group do you have? What are your hobbies? 

Next, ask yourself where you would like to be one year from now relative to what you’d like to accomplish in five years. Write the answer out in enough detail so that it seems real to you. Then, ask yourself where you’d like to be three months from now. Be specific.

What about one month or one week? What one small action could you take this week to come closer to achieving your master plan?

This exercise is a fun and eye-opening way to line up your goals with the bigger picture of your life so that you won’t waste your precious time on passing fancies and other people’s agendas.

2. Create Nested Goals

The most efficient way to achieve your goals is to nest action items inside them, the first “N” in ENVISION. Goal-oriented people get specific about when, where, and how they’ll reach their objectives by breaking them down into sub-goals.

Make your aspirations challenging but not too hard. Each one should be measurable. Instead of writing “I’d like to write a book,” try setting an intention such as “I’d like to write two hours a day, four times a week” and mark space on your calendar for it.

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Make your aims positive and keep track of your progress. Instead of business goals like “I’d like to quit my stinking job,” think about what a desirable career would look like. Try “I’d like to develop educational toys with like-minded people in a virtual office,” and then send out your résumé to companies with matching job openings.

Come up with alternative pathways to your goals so that if one doesn’t work, you’ll already have plan B in place. It’s normal to fail and experience setbacks. This goal-oriented strategy will help you move forward on the pathway to your dreams no matter what happens.

You can learn more on creating effectively goals here:

3. Get Clear on Your Values

Before you start setting goals, it’s important to ask yourself what you really value, the “V” in ENVISION.

The number one regret of people on their deathbed is that they did not live their dreams. Don’t let that be you. To avoid living a life full of “shoulds” and obligations, make a wish list. Jot down what you really want, and put all the reasons you think you can’t have it aside.

These aspirations can range from the material (such as a new car) to the psychological (high self-worth), to the spiritual (inner peace), to pretty much anything you can think of. What kind of life would be music to your ears? It doesn’t matter whether it seems unattainable or even downright crazy.

Giving yourself permission to daydream about a rich and fulfilling life is the first step to getting it. Be sure your goals speak to your soul.

4. Make Time for Inspiration

As you put your goals together, think about how you can find downtime to become goal-driven and receive inspiration in your life, the first “I” in ENVISION.

Americans put in the longest work hours and get the shortest paid vacation time in the developed world. Those of us “lucky” enough to have jobs have added another day to our work week because we now check work emails and calls from home. It’s easy to see why it’s hard to stay motivated toward specific goals in the long-term. 

However, the second regret of the dying is that they wished they didn’t work so hard. Research shows that people who engage in creative hobbies and side projects are happier and flourish more in life because they can generate new ideas and express themselves uniquely.[1] Feeling energized and playful, they get more done in less time, become better problem solvers, and receive better evaluations at work.[2]

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5. Form Goals Around Your Superpowers

Research shows that people are more likely to succeed when they develop their natural strengths, the “S” in ENVISION, than work on their weaknesses.

You can find your superpowers by answering these questions.

Each of us has a unique purpose in life. Most of us don’t realize it, though, because we’ve been pressured to conform to someone else’s idea of who we should be. Fear of change and staying in our comfort zones stunts our growth. Stretch yourself and take a risk if you want to find out what makes your heart sing.

Make an action plan to create a life in which you express your superpowers on a regular basis, whether it be through your vocation, a meaningful side project, a worthy cause, mindful parenting, volunteer work, or whatever else sparks your interest. This goal-oriented strategy guarantees you’ll thrive at work and at home.

6. Make Time for Intimates

When setting your goals, be sure to carve out time for your intimates, the second “I” in ENVISION. Intimates refers to close friends or people you have close relationships with.

The fourth regret of the dying is that they were too busy to see their friends much.[3] Make it a point to connect with real friends, people you can turn to for sympathy when you need it, confide in about most things, and be your true self around.

A new Cigna study shows that nearly half of Americans feel alone or left out.[4] According to Dr. Julianne Holt-Lunstad at Brigham Young University, the detrimental effects of loneliness is the same as smoking 15 cigarettes a day.[5] She warns that:

“Loneliness and social isolation are linked to around a 30 percent increased risk of having a stroke or developing coronary artery disease.”[6]

Become goal-driven to avoid loneliness

    Being with your friends is not only good for your soul, but it is also essential for your health and well-being[7]. Put it in your goals.

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    7. Open up Emotionally

    When crafting your goal-oriented life, be sure to include ways you can open up about your feelings, the “O” in ENVISION. The third regret of the dying is that they wish they’d had the courage to express their true feelings instead of stuffing their emotions down to keep peace with others.

    To lead a fulfilling life, it’s important to prioritize talking and behaving honestly with others instead of hiding your true feelings. According to Dr. Leslie Becker-Phelps[8]:

    “Start with identifying your emotions (e.g. angry, hurt) and understanding what triggered you to feel this way.”

    She recommends you try to understand your feelings and practice self-compassion for having them. When you’re calmer, try to understand the person who upset you. This will help you respect and care about yourself and the other person.

    If there is someone you need to talk to or a situation you’d like to resolve, honor your feelings. Whether it be writing a letter, making a phone call, or visiting someone you haven’t seen in years, put it on your goal list.

    Be sure to meet in a safe environment if you’re confronting someone who has abused or harmed you. Tell the truth as you see it, and try to be kind.

    Sharing your genuine feelings may bring you closer together, and it may not. It doesn’t really matter how the other person responds. What matters is that you expressed your true self. Make emotional honesty a habit by adding it to your goals.

    8. Nurture Happiness

    To be more goal-oriented and succeed in life, nurture the people and activities that bring you joy, the final “N” in ENVISION.

    The fifth regret of people on their deathbed is that they wished they’d let themselves be happier. Instead, they stayed stuck in old patterns and pretended to be content when they weren’t.

    If you don’t like your job, make it a goal to look for a new position that aligns your paycheck with your purpose. If you are entrepreneurially-minded, think about turning your passion project into a business you love. If you have multiple passions, consider pursuing a slash career (e.g., copywriter/coder/career coach).

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    According to Forbes Magazine, many companies are beginning to see the value in hiring employees who have side gigs that differ from their main vocations. You’ll bring in multiple streams of income and experience more meaning and fulfillment in your life.[9]

    If you are unhappy with your marriage or romantic relationship, set a goal to do something about it. Do you need to go to counseling? Do you need to move on?

    If you’re on the fence about whether to keep a friend in your life, be goal-oriented about getting closure on the issue. Take care of yourself in the process by completing positive daily tasks, like taking yoga classes or getting a much-needed massage.

    Whatever you do, make it a goal to show compassion as often as you can because it will boost your happiness.[10] By helping others in need, you not only can decrease their suffering, but you can also make yourself happier than you could by directly pursuing activities to make you happy.

    Final Thoughts

    In summary, the ENVISION method shows you how to blend lessons from the five regrets of the dying with effective goal-setting techniques that center around your strengths to become goal-driven.

    It may seem like a lot of work at first glance, but, in truth, it should only take you about an hour to piece together a list of goals following these guidelines. Why not trade an hour of watching television or engaging in social media to do this instead? You can always get online and watch TV later to reward yourself for becoming more goal-oriented.

    You’ve got nothing to lose and everything to gain by exploring what would make your heart sing. It’s worth investing in yourself this way. You have the power to create a life that totally rocks by setting the intention to do so. As the 13th-century Persian poet Rumi wrote,

    “What you seek is seeking you.”

    More Tips on Achieving Goals

    Featured photo credit: Alexa Williams via unsplash.com

    Reference

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