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I’ve Had 5 Jobs in 5 Years—Here’s What I Learned

I’ve Had 5 Jobs in 5 Years—Here’s What I Learned

When walking into an interview for a new job, you’re interviewing your potential employer just as much as they’re interviewing you -there’s nothing worse than landing what you thought was your dream job and being unhappy after the first week because you didn’t get a thorough understanding of the company during your conversations with the hiring manager.

After working for five companies in five years, I can assure you I’ve made many mistakes in choosing the company. While I’ve gotten important experience at every place I worked, I might not have said yes to one or two of them, had I paid closer attention.

Take advantage of what I learned and look for these details next time you’re about to sit in the hot seat.

Office Culture Is Everything

When you walk into an office, observe the manner of the people working there. It’s pretty evident when someone thoroughly enjoys where they work. Is the receptionist friendly? Is your potential boss treating their employees well? Is the office loud? A recent survey found that 22 percent of people listed the number one on-the-job pet peeve as loud coworkers – don’t overlook details like this. I can’t stand a loud office.

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While not all of these particulars will be obvious, you can pick up on subtle clues to determine if the office culture aligns with the work environment you thrive in. I made the mistake of taking a job after having a poor interview experience, and spent an unhappy year and a half dealing with that decision.

What I learned: The office is where you spend 40-plus hours a week; make sure it’s a place you want to be at.

Know Your Deal Breakers

Be honest with yourself about deal breakers when you walk into a potential new workplace. When your interviewer describes your day-to-day job description, are there any significant red flags? I’m the first to ignore these red flags, assuming I’ll grow to like them with time.

Take note if you’re a social butterfly and yet the position is very independent or if you work best individually, but your new job description requires you to rely on other people to succeed.

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What I learned: If you notice something amiss at the interview stage, it’s worth considering. Everyone has deal breakers and sometimes you can’t be too picky, but it’s good to weigh the good and the bad as you decide where your next career step will take you.

Pick Up on Subtle Clues

As an interviewee, you’ve spent hours preparing for your potential new employer. You’ve researched the history, studied the product, learned about the people you’re interviewing with and mastered standard interview questions. You walk into the interview and confidently introduce yourself and the interviewer calls you by the wrong name.

Picking up on subtle clues like this goes both ways of course, but if you notice major slip-ups that could be improved with a little proofreading, walk away. Observe the attitude of the interviewer and other employees you talk to. Do they seem like they enjoy working for the company? Do they talk negatively about their coworkers or suggest that it’s not a great place to work?

What I learned: These are easily overlooked when you really need or want a job, but they could also be your first sign that it’s not a great company to work for.

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Pay Attention to Your Gut

This is a hard one to suggest, because everyone’s gut feelings are different. That doesn’t mean yours is any less reliable than the next person’s, so use it. I had an interesting experience with this myself. While everything seemed good on paper, minus a few small details, there was something I couldn’t shake after leaving the interview.

I took the job and ended up leaving a week and a half later – that’s how bad it was. I felt awful leaving after the company had put time into processing my paperwork and training me; I’d never done something like that before, but I knew I had to. If I hadn’t ignored my gut, all of that could have been avoided.

What I learned: You know yourself better than anyone else. Use this to your advantage as you go through the interview process.

Ask to Observe or Shadow

Ask to sit in on a company meeting or shadow someone for a day. See if people are interacting in a positive, innovative, creative way and if management takes part in the process. Working alongside new people can be difficult at first, but if you know for certain you’re going to be part of a dynamic team, it will be worth the nervousness.

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I interviewed for a position that I thought would be my dream job and left feeling incredibly uncertain. I vowed to shadow a current employee if I was asked to go any further into the interview process, just to be sure it was a good fit.

Note that it may be best to ask about this later in the interview process, either after you’ve been offered the position or when you’re in the final stage. Employers are interviewing many people, not just you, and allowing everyone to shadow would reduce productivity on the team and become exhausting for other employees.

What I learned: Sometimes you don’t know what you’re getting into until you’re in it. Get into it during the interview by shadowing to be more certain about the position.

Treat your interview as a chance to really get a feel for the company, not just the job you’re applying for. There may never be the perfect company along your career path, but if you leave an interview feeling absolutely certain that you belong with the company, you may be on the right track.

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Last Updated on December 1, 2020

How to Find Your Entrepreneurial Passion and Purpose

How to Find Your Entrepreneurial Passion and Purpose

I wrote a few articles about starting a business based on something you love doing and are passionate about. I received several responses from people saying they weren’t sure how to go about figuring out what they were most passionate about or how to find their true purpose. So I’m dedicating this article to these issues — how to find your entrepreneurial passion and purpose.

When I work with a new client, the first thing we talk about is lifestyle design. I ask each client, “What do you want your life to look like?” If you designed a business without answering this question, you could create a nice, profitable business that is completely incompatible with your goals in life. You’d be making money, but you’d probably be miserable.

When you’re looking for your life purpose, lifestyle design isn’t a crucial component. However, since we’re talking about entrepreneurial purpose, lifestyle design is indeed crucial to building a business that you’ll enjoy and truly be passionate about.

For example, say you want to spend more time at home with your family. Would you be happy with a business that kept you in an office or out of town much of the time? On the flip side, if you wanted to travel and see the world, how well could you accomplish that goal if your business required your presence, day in and day out, to survive? So start by getting some clarity on your personal goals and spend some time working on designing your life.

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At this point, you may need a little prodding, and you may want to hire a coach or mentor to work with you through this process. Many people are very used to the idea that there is a particular way a life “should” be. There are certain milestones most people tend to live by, and if you don’t meet those markers when or in the manner you’re “supposed” to meet them, that can cause some anxiety.

Here’s how to find your passion and purpose:

Give Yourself Permission to Dream a Little

Remember that this is your life and you can live it however you choose. Call it meditation or fantasy, but let your imagination run here. And answer this question:

“If you had no fears or financial limitations, what would your ideal life, one in which you could be totally content and happy, look like?”

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Once you’ve figured out your lifestyle design, it’s time to do a little more soul-searching to figure out what you’re truly passionate about. This is a time to really look within and look back.

Specifically, look back over your life history. When were you the happiest? What did you enjoy doing the most? Remember that what you’re looking for doesn’t necessarily have to be an entire job, but can actually be aspects of your past jobs or hobbies that you’ve really enjoyed.

Think About a Larger Life Purpose

Many successful entrepreneurs have earned their place in history by setting out to make a difference in the world. Is there a specific issue or cause that is important to you or that you’re particularly passionate about?

For some, this process of discovery may come easily. You may go through these questions and thought experiments and find the answers quickly. For others, it may be more difficult. In some cases, you may suffer from a generalized lack of passion and purpose in your life.

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Sometimes, this can come from having suppressed passion in your life for too long. Sometimes, it can come from eating poorly and lack of exercise. But occasionally, it may have something to do with your internal chemistry or programming. If the latter applies to you, it may be useful for you to seek help in the form of a coach, mentor, or counselor.

In other cases, not knowing your true purpose may be a matter of having not discovered it yet: you may not have found anything that makes your heart beat faster. If this is the case, now is the time to explore!

The Internet is a fantastic tool for learning and exploration. Search hobbies and careers and learn as much as you can about any topic that triggers your interest, then follow up at the library on the things that really intrigue you. Again, remember that this is your life and only you can give yourself permission to explore all that the world has available to you.

How Do You Know When You’ve Found Your True Entrepreneurial Purpose?

I can only tell you how I knew when I had discovered my own — it didn’t hit me like a ton of bricks. Rather, it settled over me, bringing a deep sense of peace and commitment. It felt like I had arrived home and knew exactly what to do and how to proceed.

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Everything flowed easily from that point forward. That’s not to say that I found success immediately after that moment. But rather, the path ahead of me was clear, so I knew what to do.

Decisions were easier and came faster to me. And success has come on MY terms, according to my own definitions of what success means to me in my own lifestyle design.

Dig deep, look within, and seek whatever help you need. Once you find that purpose and passion, your life — not just your entrepreneurial life, but your entire life — will never be the same.

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Featured photo credit: Garrhet Sampson via unsplash.com

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