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Hunter-Gatherers No Carbs Diet

Hunter-Gatherers No Carbs Diet

Fats used to get a bad rap, but we now know the health and food industries were wrong about fats. We know that fats are an important part of our diets. And that it’s carbs — and NOT fats — that are responsible for chronic diseases and America’s obesity epidemic.

Most people are catching on—you know carbs are making you fat and sick. But you’re only getting half the story because you’re still being told it’s OK to eat certain kinds of carbs, as long as they’re low on the glycemic index. That’s what I call a bad nutrition lie, and what I’m about to say will probably surprise you.

You don’t actually need ANY carbs in your diet.

None.

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Your body can make carbs from fat and protein.

How many carbs do we eat?

Americans eat a lot of carbs — mostly from grains. In fact, today we consume more than double the percentage of carbohydrates compared to our primal ancestors. Our ancestors didn’t eat grains. They hunted for their food. The carbs they did eat came from raw fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds.

Our ancestors’ bodies were high-performance machines. They were lean. Their hearts and lungs were strong and powerful. Their brains were dynamic. So why do the health and food industries keep telling us how healthy grains are? Because they want you to keep eating grains.

Why do the health and food industries want us to eat grains?

They’re cheap to produce and companies make big money selling grain for all those rolls, boxes of cereal and loaves of bread. But your body wasn’t designed to process those types of foods. You could not have eaten these processed foods in your native environment. And none of them are “healthy.” Not even “whole grains.”

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Your ancestors weren’t sickly.

Your ancestors didn’t suffer from the diseases that plague us today. We know this because we can look at the health and diets of indigenous tribes.

The Masai tribe in East Africa still has a diet rich in red meat and raw milk. They eat very few vegetables and almost no grains. Yet their rate of heart disease is almost zero. They don’t get cavities. They’re all lean and strong. There is no obesity, and they don’t suffer from chronic aging problems like our culture does.

The same is not true of other indigenous peoples.

The Alaska Native population once thrived on a diet rich in fresh-caught salmon, moose, seals, ducks, geese, ptarmigan, caribou, and berries, when they could get them. As they shifted to a modern Western diet, their health deteriorated.

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From 1991 through 2007, the rate of obesity among Alaska Natives rose 63%.1 Diabetes — once virtually unknown in indigenous people — is also on the rise. The Native Americans ate a diet that was stable for millennia. They were hunter-gatherers. Then the European settlers introduced farming and processed grains.

When the Native Americans sacrificed quality protein for quantity grain, they went from eating tough, hard foods to softer foods like bread and processed corn. Their jaws didn’t have to work as much to chew these softer foods. Over time, their skulls started to shrink.

This evolutionary change resulted in tooth crowding, tooth decay, fat gain, arthritis, heart disease, inflammation, shortened stature, and shorter life spans. You’ve been led to believe that modern humans are healthier, stronger and taller than our ancestors. But here’s the truth: modern humans are about 10% shorter than our hunter-gatherer ancestors. Our brains are about 10% smaller, too.2

The changes that destroyed the physical health of your ancestors are still taking place today. To YOUR body.

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Eat healthy for optimal health.

But it’s not too late to undo the damage grains are doing to your body. Your best bet for optimal health is to plan your meals around healthy protein and fat sources. Grass-fed beef, free-range poultry, wild salmon and eggs are among my top choices.

I also recommend choosing foods that are low in both glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL). The GI tells you how fast different foods spike your blood sugar. The GL measures the amount of carbohydrate in each serving of food.

You can check out my chart for GI and GL here.

When using this chart a good rule of thumb is to stick to foods with a GI of 40 or below and a GL of 10 or below.

To Your Good Health,

Al Sears, MD, CNS

1 Rosen Y. Shift from traditional foods takes toll on Alaska Native populations. Alaska News Dispatch, Sept. 28, 2014
2 Macrae F. “We’re all getting smaller and our brains are shrinking… is farming to blame?” Daily Mail.com June 12, 2011

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Last Updated on December 9, 2019

5 Simple Ways to Relieve Stress Effectively

5 Simple Ways to Relieve Stress Effectively

Everyone experiences mental stress at one time or another. Maybe you’re starting a new career, job, or business, or you feel incredibly overwhelmed between work, parenting, and your love life (or a lack of it). It could even be that you simply feel that you have way too much to do and not enough time to do it,  plus, on top of everything, nothing seems to be going the way it should!

Yup, we all experience mental stress from time-to-time, and that’s okay as long as you have the tools, techniques and knowledge that allow you to fully relieve it once it comes.

Here are 5 tips for relieving mental stress when it comes so you can function at your best while feeling good (and doing well) in work, love, or life:

1. Get Rationally Optimistic

Mental stress starts with your perception of your experiences. For instance, most people get stressed out when they perceive their reality as “being wrong” in some way. Essentially, they have a set idea of how things “should be” at any given moment, and when reality ends up being different (not even necessarily bad), they get stressed.

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This process is simply a result of perception and can be easily “fixed” by recognizing that although life might not always be going as YOU think it should, it’s still going as it should—for your own benefit.

In fact, once you fully recognize that everything in your life ultimately happens for your own growth, progress, and development—so you can achieve your goals and dreams—your perception works in your favor. You soon process and respond to your experience of life differently, for your advantage. That’s the essence of becoming “rationally optimistic.”

The result: no more mental stress.

2. Unplug

Just like you might need to unplug your computer when it starts acting all crazy, you should also “unplug” your mind.

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How on earth do you unplug your mind? Simple: just meditate.

It isn’t nearly difficult or complicated as some people think, so, if you don’t already meditate, give it a try. Whether you meditate for 5 minutes, 30 minutes, or 2 hours, this is a surefire way to reduce mental stress.

Meditation has been scientifically proven to relax your body (resulting in less mental stress), while also reducing anxiety and high blood pressure.

3. Easy on the Caffeine

Yes, we know, we know—everyone loves a nice java buzz, and that’s okay, but there’s a fine line between a small caffeine pick-me-up and a racing heart and mind that throws you into a frenzy of mental stress.

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Try giving up caffeine for a while and see how you feel. And, if that’s completely out of the question for you, at least try to minimize it. You might find that lots of your mental stress mysteriously “disappears” as your caffeine intake goes down.

4. Attack Mental Stress Via the Back Door

That’s right: your body and mind are part of the whole being, and are constantly influencing and affecting each other. If you’re experiencing a lot of mental stress, try to reduce it by calming your body down—a calm body equals a calmer mind.

How do you calm your body down and reduce physical stress? A  great way to reduce physical stress (thereby reducing mental stress) is to take natural supplements that are proven to reduce stress and anxiety while lifting your mood. Three good ones to look into are kava-kava, St John’s wort, and rhodiola rosea:

  • Kava-kava is a natural plant known to have mild sedative properties, and you should be able to find it at your natural health food store or vitamin store. It’s available in capsules or liquid extract form.
  • St John’s wort is a natural flower used to treat depression. Again, it’s found at your local health store in capsules or liquid. Because it uplifts mood (enabling you to see the brighter side of all experiences) it helps relieve mental stress as well.
  • Rhodiola rosea is a natural plant shown to reduce stress and uplift mood, and Russian athletes have been using it forever. Like the other two supplements mentioned, rhodiola rosea can be found at your natural health store in capsule or liquid form.

While these supplements are all natural and can be very helpful for most people, always check with your health care provider first as they can cause side-effects depending on your current health situation etc.

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5. Good Old-Fashioned Exercise

This tip has been around forever because it works. Nothing relieves mental stress like running, kickboxing—you name it. Anything super-physical will wipe out most of your mental stresses once the exercise endorphins (happy chemicals) are released into your brain.

The result: mental stress will be gone!

So, if you’re feeling overwhelmed or just plain stressed, try using some of the above tips. You can even print this out or save it to refer to regularly.

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Featured photo credit: Radu Florin via unsplash.com

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