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Hunter-Gatherers No Carbs Diet

Hunter-Gatherers No Carbs Diet

Fats used to get a bad rap, but we now know the health and food industries were wrong about fats. We know that fats are an important part of our diets. And that it’s carbs — and NOT fats — that are responsible for chronic diseases and America’s obesity epidemic.

Most people are catching on—you know carbs are making you fat and sick. But you’re only getting half the story because you’re still being told it’s OK to eat certain kinds of carbs, as long as they’re low on the glycemic index. That’s what I call a bad nutrition lie, and what I’m about to say will probably surprise you.

You don’t actually need ANY carbs in your diet.

None.

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Your body can make carbs from fat and protein.

How many carbs do we eat?

Americans eat a lot of carbs — mostly from grains. In fact, today we consume more than double the percentage of carbohydrates compared to our primal ancestors. Our ancestors didn’t eat grains. They hunted for their food. The carbs they did eat came from raw fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds.

Our ancestors’ bodies were high-performance machines. They were lean. Their hearts and lungs were strong and powerful. Their brains were dynamic. So why do the health and food industries keep telling us how healthy grains are? Because they want you to keep eating grains.

Why do the health and food industries want us to eat grains?

They’re cheap to produce and companies make big money selling grain for all those rolls, boxes of cereal and loaves of bread. But your body wasn’t designed to process those types of foods. You could not have eaten these processed foods in your native environment. And none of them are “healthy.” Not even “whole grains.”

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Your ancestors weren’t sickly.

Your ancestors didn’t suffer from the diseases that plague us today. We know this because we can look at the health and diets of indigenous tribes.

The Masai tribe in East Africa still has a diet rich in red meat and raw milk. They eat very few vegetables and almost no grains. Yet their rate of heart disease is almost zero. They don’t get cavities. They’re all lean and strong. There is no obesity, and they don’t suffer from chronic aging problems like our culture does.

The same is not true of other indigenous peoples.

The Alaska Native population once thrived on a diet rich in fresh-caught salmon, moose, seals, ducks, geese, ptarmigan, caribou, and berries, when they could get them. As they shifted to a modern Western diet, their health deteriorated.

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From 1991 through 2007, the rate of obesity among Alaska Natives rose 63%.1 Diabetes — once virtually unknown in indigenous people — is also on the rise. The Native Americans ate a diet that was stable for millennia. They were hunter-gatherers. Then the European settlers introduced farming and processed grains.

When the Native Americans sacrificed quality protein for quantity grain, they went from eating tough, hard foods to softer foods like bread and processed corn. Their jaws didn’t have to work as much to chew these softer foods. Over time, their skulls started to shrink.

This evolutionary change resulted in tooth crowding, tooth decay, fat gain, arthritis, heart disease, inflammation, shortened stature, and shorter life spans. You’ve been led to believe that modern humans are healthier, stronger and taller than our ancestors. But here’s the truth: modern humans are about 10% shorter than our hunter-gatherer ancestors. Our brains are about 10% smaller, too.2

The changes that destroyed the physical health of your ancestors are still taking place today. To YOUR body.

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Eat healthy for optimal health.

But it’s not too late to undo the damage grains are doing to your body. Your best bet for optimal health is to plan your meals around healthy protein and fat sources. Grass-fed beef, free-range poultry, wild salmon and eggs are among my top choices.

I also recommend choosing foods that are low in both glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL). The GI tells you how fast different foods spike your blood sugar. The GL measures the amount of carbohydrate in each serving of food.

You can check out my chart for GI and GL here.

When using this chart a good rule of thumb is to stick to foods with a GI of 40 or below and a GL of 10 or below.

To Your Good Health,

Al Sears, MD, CNS

1 Rosen Y. Shift from traditional foods takes toll on Alaska Native populations. Alaska News Dispatch, Sept. 28, 2014
2 Macrae F. “We’re all getting smaller and our brains are shrinking… is farming to blame?” Daily Mail.com June 12, 2011

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Last Updated on August 4, 2020

8 Benefits of a Minimalist Lifestyle That Get You to Live With Less

8 Benefits of a Minimalist Lifestyle That Get You to Live With Less

Minimalism is a way to put a stop to the gluttony of the world around us. It’s the opposite of every advertisement we see plastered on the radio and TV. We live in a society that prides itself on the accumulation of stuff; we eat up consumerism, material possessions, clutter, debt, distractions and noise.

What we don’t seem to have is any meaning left in our world.

By adopting a minimalist lifestyle, you can throw out what you don’t need in order to focus on what you do need.

I know first hand how little we actually need to survive. I was fortunate enough to live in a van for four months while traveling throughout Australia. This experience taught me valuable lessons about what really matters and how little we really need all this stuff we surround ourselves with.

Less is more.

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Living a minimalist lifestyle is reducing.There are a few obvious benefits of minimalism such as less cleaning and stress, a more organized household and more money to be found, but there are also a few deep, life-changing benefits.

What we don’t usually realize is that when we reduce, we reduce a lot more than just stuff.

Consider just some of the benefits of living with fewer possessions:

1. Create Room for What’s Important

When we purge our junk drawers and closets we create space and peace. We lose that claustrophobic feeling and we can actually breathe again. Create the room to fill up our lives with meaning instead of stuff.

2. More Freedom

The accumulation of stuff is like an anchor, it ties us down. We are always terrified of losing all our ‘stuff’. Let it go and you will experience a freedom like never before: a freedom from greed, debt, obsession and overworking.

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3. Focus on Health and Hobbies

When you spend less time at Home Depot trying unsuccessfully to keep up with the Joneses, you create an opening to do the things you love, things that you never seem to have time for.

Everyone is always saying they don’t have enough time, but how many people really stop and look at what they are spending their time doing?

You could be enjoying a day with your kids, hitting up the gym, practicing yoga, reading a good book or traveling. Whatever it is that you love you could be doing, but instead you are stuck at Sears shopping for more stuff.

4. Less Focus on Material Possessions

All the stuff we surround ourselves with is merely a distraction, we are filling a void. Money can’t buy happiness, but it can buy comfort. After the initial comfort is satisfied, that’s where our obsession with money should end.

We are bombarded by the media presenting promises of happiness through materialistic measures. It’s no wonder we struggle everyday. Resist those urges. It’s an empty path, it won’t make you happy.

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It’s hard not to get roped into the consumerism trap. I need constant reminders that it’s a false sense of happiness. I enjoy stuff, but I also recognize that I don’t need it.

5. More Peace of Mind

When we cling onto material possessions we create stress because we are always afraid of losing these things. By simplifying your life you can lose your attachment to these things and ultimately create a calm, peaceful mind.

The less things you have to worry about, the more peace you have, and it’s as simple as that.

6. More Happiness

When de-cluttering your life, happiness naturally comes because you gravitate towards the things that matter most. You see clearly the false promises in all the clutter, it’s like a broken shield against life’s true essence.

You will also find happiness in being more efficient, you will find concentration by having refocused your priorities, you will find joy by enjoying slowing down.

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7. Less Fear of Failure

When you look at Buddhist monks, they have no fear, and they have no fear because they don’t have anything to lose.

In whatever you wish to pursue doing you can excel, if you aren’t plagued with the fear of losing all your worldly possessions. Obviously you need to take the appropriate steps to put a roof over your head, but also know that you have little to fear except fear itself.

8. More Confidence

The entire minimalist lifestyle promotes individuality and self reliance. This will make you more confident in your pursuit of happiness.

What’s Next? Go Minimalism.

If you’re ready to start living a minimalist lifestyle, these articles can help you to kickstart:

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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