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Millennials, Keep These Words Off Of Your Resume!

Millennials, Keep These Words Off Of Your Resume!

Millennials, the job market can be tough, especially for workers who don’t have decades of experience under their belts. One way you can standout from the pool of other applicants is by sprucing up your resume. The first step is keeping these words off your resume.

“Hardworking”

Recruiters and hiring managers want to assume that every applicant is hardworking, so there’s really no need to explicitly say that you have this quality. The content of your resume should show that you’re hardworking so you don’t have to say it. For example, did you complete a graduate program while also working full-time? That will show that you know how to put your nose to the grind more than the word “hardworking” does.

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“Team player”

If you write that one of your strengths is being a team player, but then you don’t back it up with experience, the word will mean nothing to hiring managers and recruiters. Strengthen your resume by removing this word and adding in experience that demonstrates how you were a team player. Talk about your contributions to a team project that your former boss assigned or how you successfully lead a group of wholesale distributors to achieve double digit sales growth.

“Detail oriented”

When you use detail oriented in a resume, you are almost challenging the hiring managers and recruiters to find a tiny mistake in your writing. If there is one word misspelled or one misplaced comma, the recruiter or hiring manager will question how detail oriented you really are. Instead of stating that you are detail oriented, show it by turning in a flawless resume.

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“Go-to person”

Did you think of yourself as a go-to person at your previous job? Were your co-workers constantly turning to you for advice or assistance? You may be tempted to add this thought into your resume, but try to resist. A real go-to person in the office will have been given extra responsibilities or duties since managers know that they can handle the workload.

Therefore, if you were the go-to person that you claim, you should be able to show it by talking about the extra roles you took on in the position. For example, many companies will turn the “go-to people” into subject matter experts over a certain topic so that co-workers know who to talk to when issues arise. If this is the case, be sure to add this title to your resume, but leave out the “go-to person.”

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“Responsible for ____”

Every employee has responsibilities, so showing that you were responsible for certain tasks does not impress any hiring manager or recruiter. Use other action verbs such as “led,” “managed,” or “transformed” to show what you actually did with those responsibilities instead of just listing them out. This will show hiring managers how much initiative you take when given a task instead of proving to them that you are capable of doing the basic work.

“Salary negotiable”

Hiring managers assume that every applicant is willing to negotiate when it comes to salary, so adding “salary negotiable” to your resume will just look like you’re trying to fill space because you ran out of achievements. The same can be said for the phrase “references available upon request”. Employers will assume that they can always ask an applicant for references, so there is no need to write this out on your resume. Keep a minimum salary in mind when you’re applying for jobs, but don’t put it on the actual resume. In fact, salaries should not be discussed until you receive an interview.

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Managers, are there any words that you hate seeing on applicants’ resumes? What words do you look for on incoming resumes? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

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Joel Goldstein

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Last Updated on October 28, 2020

The Crucial Letter Your SMART Goal Is Missing

The Crucial Letter Your SMART Goal Is Missing

SMART goals are a simple, logical way to organize your goals as you set them throughout life. Not only does this technique help you identify reachable goals, but it helps break down goals into smaller and more manageable pieces.

However, there is one crucial element (or letter) that is missing from this acronym. This missing letter can potentially make it harder for you to reach your goal – no matter how well you have broken down your goal into different pieces and action steps. However, once you understand this missing piece, you’ll be able to use it to move forward with your goals.

What Are Smart Goals?

If you are not familiar with the SMART goal setting technique and what the acronym means, here is a brief rundown with a simple example:

  • S = Specific — Your goal has to be specific enough (“I want to lose 4 inches off my waist”).
  • M = Measurable — You can measure your waistline every week to keep track of your progress.
  • A = Achievable — Do you think that you can do this? Or are you going too far by getting rid of yet another 4 inches? Or should you expand the goal to 5 inches; is that within reach?
  • R = Realistic — Is your lifestyle stable enough that you can commit to this goal?  Are you mentally prepared to do this? Do you have the resources you need for this goal?
  • T = Time-framed — You could want to achieve this goal within a week or within six months, but it should have a specific time frame.

As you can see, when you break down your goals like this, they become much more manageable and concrete than just saying “I want to to be slimmer.”

All fine and well, except that there is a crucial letter missing in this package – another letter “A.”

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The Missing Letter

The other letter “A” stands for accountability, and this is a great way to make sure that your defined plan is actually executed and is not left just on the talking or planning level. Even if you have crafted a masterful plan by using the SMART goal technique, it becomes useless if you don’t actually execute it. To make sure you start the execution phase, you want to throw some accountability into the mix.

By having some external pressure on your back (in the form of accountability), you are more likely to take action on your goal steps than if you just keep the plan to yourself. Accountability is based on the fact that you want to stand behind your words and save face. When you announce your goal to the world, you realize that the world is now watching you, and you don’t want to let the world down.

Accountability is also about facing the expectations of others. If you announce a goal or a task in public, other people are expecting you will achieve the tasks and goals you have laid out for yourself.

Watch this video and find out how by having dependable accountability, you can reach your goal more efficiently:

Ways to Implement the Letter “A” in Your Goal

There are plenty of ways you can go about creating accountability. Choose which one will work to motivate you the most.

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1. Keep It to Yourself

I was a bit hesitant to include this, since in this scenario you are not telling others about your plans or tasks. However, for some people this might work since your conscience is your accountability partner in this situation. And you don’t want to let your conscience down.

2. Announce It to Other People

Your people could be your colleagues at work, your local golf club buddies, the subscribers and readers of your blog, or your Twitter followers. I would say that accountability is more effective when dealing with “offline people.” Being accountable face-to-face to someone is very effective.

I’m in no way underestimating the power of “online people” either. If you are trying to form solid relationships with others online, you want to keep your word – even if you don’t necessarily meet the people in the same sense as in the offline world.

3. Find an Accountability Partner

A more intimate way of being accountable is to find an accountability partner. This could be a friend or spouse, but it needs to be someone you feel comfortable reporting to. When this route is chosen, you might decide to call your partner on a frequent basis to tell them how well you are progressing on the goal.

4. Get on Stickk.com

If none of the above ways work for you, it’s time to put Stickk into play.

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Stickk.com is a website where you can announce your goal (“Commitment Contract”), and to make you even more committed to reaching that goal, there is money at stake. Money is not mandatory to get set up with Stickk, but knowing that you will lose a certain amount of money if you don’t reach your goal can give you an extra push to get stuff done.

5. Join Mastermind Groups

A mastermind group is a group of like-minded people gathering on a frequent basis (online or offline), trying to push each other closer to their goals. This type of accountability is very common in the business world. When you are in a mastermind group and you have set the objectives you want to achieve by the next meeting, you want to get stuff done and fulfill other’s expectations.

Mastermind groups are a great way to improve your productivity and reach your goals with the help of others.

6. Hire a Coach

If you really want to get personal attention for your goals, then hiring a personal coach may be the best way to stay accountable.

Not only are you accountable to your coach, but you also have to pay for his/her attention. This makes the coach option even more effective. You want to make sure you do everything you can to get the assignments done before the deadline you two have set. So, there is a money factor to keep you accountable as well. Since you want to quickly move forward, this option is a very effective for staying accountable with your SMART goals.

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The Bottom Line

Next time, set your goal using “SMARTA,” instead. Add that letter “A” to the SMART goal setting technique:

Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time-framed, Accountable.

The accountability factor of reaching your goals may be just the thing you need to make them a reality.

More Tips on SMART Goals

Featured photo credit: Estée Janssens via unsplash.com

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