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Creativity Is Not Only About The Left Brain, Here’s Why

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Creativity Is Not Only About The Left Brain, Here’s Why

What do you recall hearing about the right and left brain? Did you learn that the right brain is all about logic and reason, and the left side is all about creativity?

As most of us think, the brain is made up of two parts, the left side being connected to analysis, and the right side being connected to creativity. Well, scientists are here to tell us different. There are actually a complex set of reasons as to why some people are more creative. Scientific evidence tells us that creativity is triggered in many different areas of the brain.

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Do you want to be more creative? Here are reasons why you can be! It isn’t just about what you were born with.

It’s Not Just About IQ

When we think about the people with the best ideas we often think of the geniuses – the Albert Einstein’s, the Amelia Earhart’s, the Picasso’s, and the Jane Austen’s. We think of the utmost masters of the craft. However, the realm of creativity falls under an enormous umbrella. Being intelligent actually has far less of an impact on creativity than people think. Contrary to popular belief, it is not down to our IQ levels when it comes to sparking creative thought – at least not as much as we were probably led to believe.

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Creativity is Made Up of Many Factors

Creativity is actually due a to a whole range of factors, including emotional characteristics, your personal morals, your levels of motivation, as well as where you stand intellectually. It isn’t IQ that is the common denominator between creative minds, but in fact a general sameness in certain character traits. These include how open they are to their inner selves, their high level of tolerance regarding chaos and disarray in their surrounding areas, their ability to be in such chaos and not only function within it, but also find a way to organize and structure it. Creative types are genuine risk-takers who thrive on individuality and independence. They are masters of the unconventional. They prefer to discover. They enjoy ambiguity. They thrive on uncertainty, for it is there that they can search for answers, or maybe even make an answer of their own.

It is a mixing pot of traits perhaps, but within this lies a bundle of oxymoronic characteristics, and possibly the reason why the brain is healthy when we exercise creativity. Creative personalities are both constructive and deconstructive. They find use in being both cultured and primal. They are sane, but they are also crazy!

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The Whole Creative Brain

It seems that creative types are much more introspective about their inner selves. When they tap into creativity (or when anyone sits down to take part in a creative task) they are using many different parts of the brain as a whole, not just the right or left side. Although creative types seem to be (and probably describe themselves) as an “individual”, they are actually better described as a “multitude”. They are complex because of the different parts of the mind they tap into when exploring their inner selves.

A Healthy Imagination Means A Healthy Mind

It is very important to keep using your imagination and let your mind wander into daydream, so that these parts of the brain are being engaged. The brain is an interplay of different triggers when we are creative. It is a processing system that is activated in the inside surface of the brain, engaging the temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes.

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Our imagination (or our “imaginative network” in our brains) allows us to recall things easier, understand stories, have compassion for others, reflect on life, and better understand emotions that people have. Our imaginative network operates in conjunction with other brain networks, so it’s integral that we keep it as active as possible.

So, spend time with children and draw with their crayons right alongside them! It will quite literally open up your mind.

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Featured photo credit: Vulcan Post via az598155.vo.msecnd.net

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Last Updated on January 13, 2022

How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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How to Use Travel Time Effectively

Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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1. Take Your Time Getting There

As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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2. Go Gadget-Free

This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

3. Reflect and Prepare

Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

Conclusion

Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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