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4 Extreme Sports That Will Get You In Shape and Expand Your Comfort Zone

4 Extreme Sports That Will Get You In Shape and Expand Your Comfort Zone

Have you ever been flipping through the channels and landed on one of those X Games competitions on ESPN?

You might have thought to yourself something along the lines of “Wow, I wish I could do that” or “Oh my gosh, I could never do that!”

Well, chances are, you’re probably at least halfway right: You could never do what these professionals do in your current state. The people you see laughing in the face of danger while performing death-defying stunts have dedicated their entire lives to doing what they do, so there’s no shame in not being on their level.

But that doesn’t mean participating in extreme sports is completely out of the question for you.

By nature, extreme sports are those in which the risk of injury is high if you don’t know what you’re doing. Because of this, they require participants to be in top physical condition in a variety of specific areas.

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If simply going to the gym seems like a boring way to get in shape, maybe you should check out some of the following activities to not only get you up off the couch, but also help expand your horizons.

Mountain Biking

It’s one thing to hop on a stationary bike at your local gym for an hour and pedal up and down virtual hills while watching the news. Taking your mountain bike out into the real world requires a lot more than just leg strength.

Biking through forests and over rocky terrain requires you to have complete control over your body and bike. You need to be able to counteract any bumps in the road through balanced actions while not overcorrecting too much and ending up on the ground.

You’ll also need to utilize your upper body strength to keep your wheels pointed in the direction of your path. As previously mentioned, this isn’t something you need to worry about when taking a virtual tour on a stationary bike from the comfort of your gym.

Getting in shape isn’t all about physicality – it has a lot to do with mental toughness as well. You need to maintain focus during your bike ride, and be prepared for any danger that comes across your path. Letting your guard down for even a second could lead to disaster, so keep your eyes on the road.

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Mountain Climbing

For those of you not absolutely terrified of heights, mountain climbing is a great way to work your core, build up stamina, and do something most people would never dream of doing.

Mountain climbing requires you to not just haul yourself up the side of a mountain, but your backpack full of equipment, as well. Because of this, you’ll need to do some basic strength training exercises from the safety of your home or gym. Once you’re strong enough to support the extra weight on your back, you’ll be a little more prepared to do so while scaling up a mountain.

You’ll also need to build up your stamina before your first climb. Natural mountains don’t exactly have rest points built into them, so once you get started you won’t be able to stop if you start to feel tired. Make sure you have the endurance to make it to a safe spot at all times.

You’ll also need to take into consideration the fact that the higher you go, the harder you’ll have to work. There really isn’t any way to prepare for the different feeling of climbing at higher altitudes other than to just do it, so it’s best to over-prepare yourself, knowing you’ll naturally be weaker the higher you go.

Surfing/Waterskiing

If you’ve ever seen professionals surf, or even watched seemingly everyday people waterski, you might have thought it looks pretty easy. You simply stand up on the board or skis and let the waves push you or the boat pull you, right?

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Obviously, it’s not that simple. Both require a lot of physical and mental prowess throughout the entire process.

First of all, you need to be patient. Rushing into either activity will lead to immediate failure. Whether waiting for the perfect wave or waiting for the exact right time to stand, you have to understand that the water is an outside factor which you cannot control. Wait for conditions to be optimal before you dive in.

Speaking of diving in, you’ll obviously need to be a great swimmer before you participate in either of these activities. You’ll need to be able to get to shore if things go wrong, which usually means battling undertow or unexpected circumstances. Large bodies of water are completely unpredictable, so make sure you can counteract nature with your physical abilities before trying these extreme sports.

As previously mentioned, waterskiing and surfing aren’t just about standing up and going along for the ride. You need to be in complete control of your body at all times. This includes maintaining balance, shifting your weight, and leaning in to counteract natural bumps along the way. As with all extreme sports, you’re not a passive observer when engaged in waterskiing or surfing; you’re an active participant who needs to know what their doing at all times in order to stay afloat.

Skiing

Though we can all agree that the dangers of skiing are fairly obvious, many of us probably think it’s pretty simple. Not that it’s easy by any means; it just seems pretty straightforward: Get dropped off at the top of a hill, stand up, and don’t hit any trees on the way down.

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If only it were that easy.

Skiing requires you to utilize a variety of strengths and skills in conjunction with one another at all times.

First of all, you need to remember the ground under you isn’t solid; it’s, ideally, the most powdery snow imaginable. Of course, this means the ground underneath your skis will constantly shift with your weight as you race down the hill. If you don’t distribute your weight correctly, you’ll end up quickly going off course – and likely right into danger.

You’ll also need to be able to shift your footing (called edging) in order to turn when necessary. Subtle shifts in your ankles and feet determine the angle at which your ski hits the snow, and determine how smooth your run will be. Edging requires a combination of balance and leg strength to be able to pull off correctly.

Finally, skiing utilizes the ball-and-socket joints in your hips in a technique called rotary movement. Used in conjunction with edging, rotary movements are the best way in which to steer your skis. It requires you to not only have control of your legs, but also your hips and torso as you race downhill.

Featured photo credit: Surf / Eduardo Avalith / Flickr via farm9.staticflickr.com

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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