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8 Top Reasons For Ditching Processed Carbs In The Menopause

8 Top Reasons For Ditching Processed Carbs In The Menopause

My menopause journey began shortly after the birth of my second child. I was 38 years of age and for the first time found myself struggling to lose the weight I had put on. I did not have any trouble losing weight after my first child at the age of 36, but in a few short years, my body was starting to change; little did I know it was the Big Change!

At the time, I considered myself to be eating well and was reasonably active. Being a mum to two young boys as well as running a business did not leave much time for exercise. Meals had to be prepared fast so for me that meant a lot of processed breakfast cereals for breakfast, sandwiches for lunch and pasta dishes in the evening.

Processed cereals included quinoa flakes with soy milk, brown bread for lunch and whole meal pasta for dinner. I was getting in my recommend 6-11 servings of bread, rice and pasta with a smattering of fruit and vegetables (sandwich fillings, pasta sauces). I was following the guidelines but knew that something was wrong.

I was tired, irritable and short tempered. No matter how much sleep I had I wanted more. I was getting bigger and bigger and was denying myself any “treats” due to my ever expanding waistline.

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And then I read something that changed my life forever. As a woman’s oestrogen levels decrease, so too does her tolerance for carbohydrates. This is due to the fact that decreasing levels of estrogen lead to insulin resistance and impaired carbohydrate tolerance.

Insulin sensitivity is your body’s ability to use carbs for fuel, instead of storing them as fat. So reduced insulin sensitivity means that you’re more likely to gain weight, especially in areas you never had a problem with before menopause, aka belly fat.

One of the easiest ways to manage decreased insulin sensitivity and avoid the weight gain that comes with it is to re-evaluate your carb tolerance and adjust your meals accordingly.

My 8 Top Reasons For Ditching Processed Carbs

1. Not all carbs are equal

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Choosing other sources of carbohydrates such as fresh fruit and vegetable assists in maintaining a healthy colon. Constipation is a common complaint as women age and the fiber content found in green leafy vegetables helps to keep constipation at bay.

2. Fight fatigue

Processed carbs tend to cause a spike in your blood glucose levels, which will eventually crash; leaving you feeling fatigued, tired and drained.

3. Eat less “quick” carbs and spend more time on food quality.

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As we grow older, our body requires fewer calories to sustain it. I now find myself eating less as I sit down to eat, thus leaving some of the meal to be used the following day. This saves time and allows for a lunch on the go the following day.

4. Ease hormonal imbalance

Hormonal imbalances are one of the most common issues that result from menopause. Certain foods contain phyto-oestrogens, which are oestrogenic compounds that regulate and restore hormonal balance. A diet rich in phyto-oestrogens helps to minimise hot flushes/flashes and other menopausal symptoms. Such foods include sunflower seeds, linseeds, sesame seeds, pumpkins seeds, celery, green beans and rhubarb.

5. Know that eating that muffin is not going to bring you happiness.

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We often crave foods with associations to happy times we’ve had in the past. I am not suggesting that you have to forego treats forever. By all means enjoy a treat or two each week, but do be aware that if you are looking for a pick-me-up in the form of a chocolate cake or muffin, you will have a crash landing two hours or so later when your blood sugar levels come back down.

6. Save money

It never ceases to amaze me when people first start buying more fruit and vegetables; the first thing they complain about is the cost. Dollar for dollar, if you cut down on the amount of processed food and increase your carbs with more fruit and vegetable I can assure you the cost is not higher at the end of the week, but rather you will save money.

7. Decrease stomach bloating

Highly processed, carbs are usually packed with artificial sweeteners, which are linked to promoting bloating and stomach discomfort when eaten in excess. Eating more green vegetables will aid in decreasing bloating. Be prepared though if you previously followed a diet low in fibre and then significantly increase your fibre intake, you may initially experience some bloating. Once your body adjusts, however, you should experience less bloating and abdominal discomfort.

8. More facts on bloating
Processed carbs often contain high sources of sodium, which causes water retention and bloating, however, potassium counterbalances sodium and has a diuretic effect. So by eating foods high in potassium such as oranges, bananas, papayas, kiwis, strawberries, spinach, rocket, and cooked beets—you can reduce bloating naturally.

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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