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6 Ways to Hack an Out-of-Town Job Search

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6 Ways to Hack an Out-of-Town Job Search

Many job seekers approach me looking to relocate for both personal and geographical reasons. I always hear the same frustration from all generations – most submit several applications and receive little-to-no responses. I have helped thousands of people successfully relocate their careers with these insider tips on how to effectively communicate with out-of-town employers. By gaining a better understanding of how the employer views candidates who want to relocate, your information will make it into the hands of a living, breathing recruiter versus the dreaded no-thank-you pile.

1. Plan your escape

If you’re not a local, many employers automatically assume you’re either A) a flight risk or B) someone who applies to every job out there without a real strategy. The more you can do in advance to alleviate their fears, the more success you’ll have. If the reason you’re moving is because you traveled there once and enjoyed the nightlife, that’s just not going to cut it.

Remember, a new hire costs an organization A LOT of money, which means you’ll need to prove that you have a real career plan in order to be taken seriously. You will also need facts to back up that plan. Be prepared to state your professional goals in your resume. Try something like, “Social Media Specialist looking to relocate to Austin Texas in order to hone education and skills within an innovative organization.” This statement immediately makes your intentions known to a hiring manager and, therefore, they’ll be more likely to consider you.

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2. Take a trip

Assess your financial situation, unused vacation days and personal time off. Ideally, if you could book a live interview with your dream organization in your dream location, you can use that travel time to schedule interviews with other organizations in order to take full advantage of your stay.

Yes, you may need to use up some of your precious vacation time to scope out the employment scene, take long weekends to attend interviews, or even consider dipping into your savings to move before you have the job. But it’ll be worth it when you secure the gig you’ve always wanted.

3. Research your options

Before you make the risk of moving to another area, be sure that you’ve done your research to ensure that there are plenty of available opportunities in your field. Sometimes people make the grave mistake of moving only to find that there are no job prospects available for advertising in the middle of Iowa.

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Do a keyword search on indeed and monitor the job counts. Higher numbers mean better job opportunities. Lower numbers mean you should consider picking somewhere else. Once you’ve confirmed that the move is a “go,” connect with the companies you’re interested in and get in touch with local recruiting firms that can act as a resource to you during your search. Job fairs can also we be a great way to bypass the resume black hole and make a strong face-to-face impression.

4. Confirm your commitment

In our office, we’re fond of the saying, “fake it until you make it.” If you can manage to slap a local address onto your resume (and a couch when necessary), whether it’s a relative’s or a friend’s, you demonstrate that you’re sincere about making the move. Because employers are fearful of making the wrong hiring decision, which often costs them tens of thousands of dollars in lost revenue, they’ve adopted a “guilty until proven innocent” mindset when it comes to long-distance candidates.

This point bears repeating: consistently reminding them that you’re relocating, whether it’s for this job or for another, across all mediums, the more at ease you put hiring managers. If you don’t have a local address you can steal, be sure that your resume (objective), cover letter, email signature and LinkedIn profile clearly states your dedication to relocate to another region. Don’t just assume that because it’s in one place, employers will see it – be sure your message is consistent everywhere. 

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5. Become tech savvy

If you’re not local, you’re immediately put at a disadvantage, which means, you need to use every resource available to you in order to stay competitive. No matter how you feel about social media or video chatting, it’s time to get over your fear and get with the changing times.

Many employers will opt for a video conference as a means of conducting a first round interview. Sign up for Skype – it’s a great communication tool that’s user-friendly on both PCs and Macs, and did I mention it’s free? Heck, you could even arrange a video interview on your smartphone, which requires a whole new set of skills.

The bottom line is you have to be prepared for all different types of interviewing scenarios. And as an out-of-town candidate, you can’t afford to not be on LinkedIn. Employers will be scrutinizing you more heavily than the locals, which means you need to have a strong online brand that showcases all your latest accomplishments.

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I’m not just referring to an updated, robust profile; you also need to remain active by building your network and following trends in your field. Make sure you’re also using twitter (twesume) and Facebook to engage with a company you’re interested in. And don’t forget to look for any alumni in the area – that can be a major door opener.

6. Consider taking the plunge

The reason relocation can be so tough is because many employers prefer to hire locally rather than chance their investment on an out-of-towner. And their concerns are valid – most employers, at one time or another, have taken on new hires who decide they feel homesick, don’t like the area, or are unsatisfied with the position. Like in relationships, in the employment world, sometimes it’s not you – it’s the guy who broke her heart that came before you.

Bottom line, your chances of getting hired are much stronger if you become a local. Also, keep in mind that if you take on the burden of your relocation costs, in many cases, it becomes grounds for salary negotiation when you do get your big break. When you get that interview stick to the plan. Be prepared to align your skills and experiences to the pains and problems of that specific employer.

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Featured photo credit: craig Cloutier via imcreator.com

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Last Updated on November 15, 2021

20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

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20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

“Please describe yourself in a few words”.

It’s the job interview of your life and you need to come up with something fast. Mental pictures of words are mixing in your head and your tongue tastes like alphabet soup. You mutter words like “deterministic” or “innovativity” and you realize you’re drenched in sweat. You wish you had thought about this. You wish you had read this post before.

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    Image Credit: Career Employer

    Here are 20 sentences that you could use when you are asked to describe yourself. Choose the ones that describe you the best.

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    “I am someone who…”:

    1. “can adapt to any situation. I thrive in a fluctuating environment and I transform unexpected obstacles into stepping stones for achievements.”
    2. “consistently innovates to create value. I find opportunities where other people see none: I turn ideas into projects, and projects into serial success.”
    3. “has a very creative mind. I always have a unique perspective when approaching an issue due to my broad range of interests and hobbies. Creativity is the source of differentiation and therefore, at the root of competitive advantage.”
    4. “always has an eye on my target. I endeavour to deliver high-quality work on time, every time. Hiring me is the only real guarantee for results.”
    5. “knows this job inside and out. With many years of relevant experience, there is no question whether I will be efficient on the job. I can bring the best practices to the company.”
    6. “has a high level of motivation to work here. I have studied the entire company history and observed its business strategies. Since I am also a long-time customer, I took the opportunity to write this report with some suggestions for how to improve your services.”
    7. “has a pragmatic approach to things. I don’t waste time talking about theory or the latest buzz words of the bullshit bingo. Only one question matters to me: ‘Does it work or not?'”
    8. “takes work ethics very seriously. I do what I am paid for, and I do it well.”
    9. “can make decisions rapidly if needed. Everybody can make good decisions with sufficient time and information. The reality of our domain is different. Even with time pressure and high stakes, we need to move forward by taking charge and being decisive. I can do that.”
    10. “is considered to be ‘fun.’ I believe that we are way more productive when we are working with people with which we enjoy spending time. When the situation gets tough with a customer, a touch of humour can save the day.”
    11. “works as a real team-player. I bring the best out of the people I work with and I always do what I think is best for the company.”
    12. “is completely autonomous. I won’t need to be micromanaged. I won’t need to be trained. I understand high-level targets and I know how to achieve them.”
    13. “leads people. I can unite people around a vision and motivate a team to excellence. I expect no more from the others than what I expect from myself.”
    14. “understands the complexity of advanced project management. It’s not just pushing triangles on a GANTT chart; it’s about getting everyone to sit down together and to agree on the way forward. And that’s a lot more complicated than it sounds.”
    15. “is the absolute expert in the field. Ask anybody in the industry. My name is on their lips because I wrote THE book on the subject.”
    16. “communicates extensively. Good, bad or ugly, I believe that open communication is the most important factor to reach an efficient organization.”
    17. “works enthusiastically. I have enough motivation for myself and my department. I love what I do, and it’s contagious.”
    18. “has an eye for details because details matter the most. How many companies have failed because of just one tiny detail? Hire me and you’ll be sure I’ll find that detail.”
    19. “can see the big picture. Beginners waste time solving minor issues. I understand the purpose of our company, tackle the real subjects and the top management will eventually notice it.”
    20. “is not like anyone you know. I am the candidate you would not expect. You can hire a corporate clone, or you can hire someone who will bring something different to the company. That’s me. “

    Featured photo credit: Tim Gouw via unsplash.com

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