Advertising
Advertising

6 Ways to Hack an Out-of-Town Job Search

6 Ways to Hack an Out-of-Town Job Search

Many job seekers approach me looking to relocate for both personal and geographical reasons. I always hear the same frustration from all generations – most submit several applications and receive little-to-no responses. I have helped thousands of people successfully relocate their careers with these insider tips on how to effectively communicate with out-of-town employers. By gaining a better understanding of how the employer views candidates who want to relocate, your information will make it into the hands of a living, breathing recruiter versus the dreaded no-thank-you pile.

1. Plan your escape

If you’re not a local, many employers automatically assume you’re either A) a flight risk or B) someone who applies to every job out there without a real strategy. The more you can do in advance to alleviate their fears, the more success you’ll have. If the reason you’re moving is because you traveled there once and enjoyed the nightlife, that’s just not going to cut it.

Remember, a new hire costs an organization A LOT of money, which means you’ll need to prove that you have a real career plan in order to be taken seriously. You will also need facts to back up that plan. Be prepared to state your professional goals in your resume. Try something like, “Social Media Specialist looking to relocate to Austin Texas in order to hone education and skills within an innovative organization.” This statement immediately makes your intentions known to a hiring manager and, therefore, they’ll be more likely to consider you.

Advertising

2. Take a trip

Assess your financial situation, unused vacation days and personal time off. Ideally, if you could book a live interview with your dream organization in your dream location, you can use that travel time to schedule interviews with other organizations in order to take full advantage of your stay.

Yes, you may need to use up some of your precious vacation time to scope out the employment scene, take long weekends to attend interviews, or even consider dipping into your savings to move before you have the job. But it’ll be worth it when you secure the gig you’ve always wanted.

3. Research your options

Before you make the risk of moving to another area, be sure that you’ve done your research to ensure that there are plenty of available opportunities in your field. Sometimes people make the grave mistake of moving only to find that there are no job prospects available for advertising in the middle of Iowa.

Advertising

Do a keyword search on indeed and monitor the job counts. Higher numbers mean better job opportunities. Lower numbers mean you should consider picking somewhere else. Once you’ve confirmed that the move is a “go,” connect with the companies you’re interested in and get in touch with local recruiting firms that can act as a resource to you during your search. Job fairs can also we be a great way to bypass the resume black hole and make a strong face-to-face impression.

4. Confirm your commitment

In our office, we’re fond of the saying, “fake it until you make it.” If you can manage to slap a local address onto your resume (and a couch when necessary), whether it’s a relative’s or a friend’s, you demonstrate that you’re sincere about making the move. Because employers are fearful of making the wrong hiring decision, which often costs them tens of thousands of dollars in lost revenue, they’ve adopted a “guilty until proven innocent” mindset when it comes to long-distance candidates.

This point bears repeating: consistently reminding them that you’re relocating, whether it’s for this job or for another, across all mediums, the more at ease you put hiring managers. If you don’t have a local address you can steal, be sure that your resume (objective), cover letter, email signature and LinkedIn profile clearly states your dedication to relocate to another region. Don’t just assume that because it’s in one place, employers will see it – be sure your message is consistent everywhere. 

Advertising

5. Become tech savvy

If you’re not local, you’re immediately put at a disadvantage, which means, you need to use every resource available to you in order to stay competitive. No matter how you feel about social media or video chatting, it’s time to get over your fear and get with the changing times.

Many employers will opt for a video conference as a means of conducting a first round interview. Sign up for Skype – it’s a great communication tool that’s user-friendly on both PCs and Macs, and did I mention it’s free? Heck, you could even arrange a video interview on your smartphone, which requires a whole new set of skills.

The bottom line is you have to be prepared for all different types of interviewing scenarios. And as an out-of-town candidate, you can’t afford to not be on LinkedIn. Employers will be scrutinizing you more heavily than the locals, which means you need to have a strong online brand that showcases all your latest accomplishments.

Advertising

I’m not just referring to an updated, robust profile; you also need to remain active by building your network and following trends in your field. Make sure you’re also using twitter (twesume) and Facebook to engage with a company you’re interested in. And don’t forget to look for any alumni in the area – that can be a major door opener.

6. Consider taking the plunge

The reason relocation can be so tough is because many employers prefer to hire locally rather than chance their investment on an out-of-towner. And their concerns are valid – most employers, at one time or another, have taken on new hires who decide they feel homesick, don’t like the area, or are unsatisfied with the position. Like in relationships, in the employment world, sometimes it’s not you – it’s the guy who broke her heart that came before you.

Bottom line, your chances of getting hired are much stronger if you become a local. Also, keep in mind that if you take on the burden of your relocation costs, in many cases, it becomes grounds for salary negotiation when you do get your big break. When you get that interview stick to the plan. Be prepared to align your skills and experiences to the pains and problems of that specific employer.

Featured photo credit: craig Cloutier via imcreator.com

More by this author

6 Ways to Hack an Out-of-Town Job Search Start The New Year Off With A Bang Using These 6 Job Search Tips These 10 Ways Are How Emotionally Intelligent People Tackle Uncertainty Habits That Many People Think Can Make Them Excel At Work But Actually Cannot Race Against The Clock: 15 Time-Management Lessons Should Be Learnt In Our 20s

Trending in Work

1 10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed 2 How to Ace an Interview: 10 Tips from a Professional Career Advisor 3 5 Books You Must Read if You Want to Be a Millionaire in Your 20’s 4 8 Life-Changing Skills You Can Learn in Less Than 6 Months 5 5 Types of Leadership Styles (And Which Is Best for You)

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on June 26, 2019

10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed

10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed

Regardless of your background, times today are tough. Uneven economies around the world have made it incredibly difficult for many people to find work.

Regardless of age and qualification, stretches of unemployment have affected us all in recent years. While we might not be able to control being unemployed, we can control how we react to it.

Despite difficult conditions, there are many ways to grow and stay hopeful. Whether you’re looking for work, or just taking a breather between assignments, these 10 endeavors will keep you busy and productive. Plus, some may even help push your resume to the top of the next pile.

Here’re 10 things you should do when you’re unemployed:

1. Keep a Schedule

It’s fine to take a few days after you’re finished at work to relax, but try not to get too comfortable.

Advertising

As welcoming as permanently moving into your sweatpants may seem, keeping a schedule is one way to stay productive and focused. While unemployed, if you continue to start your day early, you are more likely to get more done. Also, keeping up with day to day tasks makes you less likely to grow depressed or inactive.

2. Join a Temp Agency

One of the easiest ways to bridge the gap between jobs is to find temporary work, or work with a temp agency. While many unemployed people job hunt religiously, rememberer to include temp agencies in the search.

While not a permanent solution, you will be in a better position financially while you search for something permanent.

3. Work Online

Another great option if you’re unemployed is online work. Many different sites offer a variety of ways to make money online, but make sure the site you’re working for is reputable.

Micro job sites such as fiverr, as well as sites that pay for you to take surveys, are all quick, legitimate options. While these sites sometimes offer lower pay, it’s always better to move forward slowly than not at all.

Advertising

4. Get Organized

Unemployment is an excellent opportunity to get organized. Embark on some spring cleaning, go through old boxes, and get rid of the things you don’t need. Streamlining your life will help you dive head first into the next chapter, plus it helps you feel like your unemployed time is spent productively.

5. Exercise

Much like organizing your life, another good way to keep yourself enthusiastic and healthy is to exercise. It doesn’t take much to get slightly more active, and exercise can help you stay positive. Even a walk around the block a few times a week can do a lot for keeping you motivated and determined. If you take care of yourself, you can make the most of this extra time.

6. Volunteer

Volunteering is an excellent way to use extra time when you’re unemployed. Additionally, if you volunteer in an area related to your job qualifications, you can often include the experience on your resume.

Not only that, doing good is a true mood booster and is sure to help you stay optimistic while looking for your next job.

7. Increase Your Skills

Looking for ways to increase your job skills while unemployed is a good way to move forward as well. Look for certifications or training you could take, especially those offered for free.

Advertising

You can qualify more for even entry level positions with extra training in your line of work, and many cities or states offer job skills training. Refreshing your resume, and interview and job skills may make your job hunt easier.

8. Treat Yourself

Unemployment can be trying and tiring, so don’t forget to treat yourself occasionally. Take a reasonable amount of time off from your weekly job hunt to recharge and rest up. Letting yourself rest will maximize your productivity during the hours you job search.

Even if you don’t have extra money for entertainment, a walk or visit to the park can do wonders to help you go back and attack your job hunt.

9. See What You Can Sell

Another good way to bridge the gap between jobs is to sell unused possessions. eBay and Amazon are both secure sites, but traditional garage sales are a fine option too. Sell off a few video games, or some electronics, for some quick and easy cash while you figure out a permanent solution.

10. Take a Course

Much like training and certifications, taking a class can be a good way to keep yourself sharp while unemployed. Especially when you’re between jobs, it can be easy to forget this option, as most courses cost money. Don’t forget the mass of free educational tools online.

Advertising

Keeping your brain sharp can help you stay focused and may even help you learn some new, relevant job skills.

The Bottom Line

While unemployment numbers are still high, there are many things you can do to better yourself and move forward. While new skills to aid your job hung might seem out of reach, there are plenty of free ways to get ahead, online and off.

Additionally, don’t forget that taking time for yourself can do wonders for keeping you productive in your job hunt. While it is a challenge, don’t give up–being unemployed can offer you extra time to better yourself, and possibly grow more qualified to find work.

Featured photo credit: Resume – Glasses/Flazingo Photos via flickr.com

Read Next