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What’s the Easiest Language to Learn for English Speakers?

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What’s the Easiest Language to Learn for English Speakers?

Who says learning a language needs to be hard? The better question to ask is: what is the easiest language to learn in the shortest amount of time?

In this article, you will find out how to know which languages will be easier for you to learn and maybe even find the motivation to give it a go!

How to Know Which Languages Are Easier to Learn

Playing to Your Strengths

One way to hack this process is to first understand that, if English is your native language, you have in your hands one of the most connected languages that exists. It’s linked to many European Germanic languages by descent or influence, and over 50 percent of English words stem from Latin or French[1].

Language family tree to find which languages are the easiest to learn

    This probably doesn’t come as a big surprise to most, as the structure, alphabet, and makeup of the language is very similar to Spanish, Italian, French, and other languages from the Latin root.

    Bestselling author and polyglot Tim Ferriss says that you should consider a new language like a new sport[2].

    There are certain physical prerequisites (height is an advantage in basketball), rules (a runner must touch the bases in baseball), and so on that determine if you can become proficient at all, and, if so, how long it will take.

    For example, it would be a wiser choice and indicate a higher likelihood of success if a professional water polo player decided to transition into playing handball: similar structures, rules, and physical requirements.

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    If you already speak English, picking a compatible language with similar sounds and word structure, like Spanish, instead of a completely different root, like Mandarin, could mean the difference between reaching conversation fluency in 3 months versus 3 years.

    Follow the Golden Sentences

    If you want to determine which is the easiest language to learn, you should aim to answer the following questions first.

    • Are there new grammatical structures that will postpone fluency?
    • Are there new sounds that will double or quadruple the time it takes to acquire fluency (particularly vowels)?
    • How similar is it to languages I already understand? What will help and what will interfere?

    An effective tool to use to answer all of these questions is called The Golden Sentences.

    It comprises eight sentences that expose much of the language, and quite a few deal breakers.

    1. The apple is red.
    2. It is John’s apple.
    3. I give John the apple.
    4. We give him the apple.
    5. He gives it to John.
    6. She gives it to him.
    7. I must give it to him.
    8. I want to give it to her.

    There’s a couple of reasons why these sentences are helpful:

    • It shows you how verbs are conjugated based on the speaker (gender and number)
    • You can see a high-level view of the fundamental sentence structures, which helps you answer questions like: is it subject-verb-object (SVO) like English and Chinese (“I eat the apple”), is it subject-object-verb (SOV) like Japanese (“I the apple eat”), or something else?
    • The first three sentences show you if the language has a noun case that may cause you problems. For example in German, “the” might be der, das, die, dem, den and more depending on whether “the apple” is an object, indirect object, possessed by someone else, etc.

    If possible, I recommend you check with a language teacher to fully understand the translation of these sentences and how transferable your existing languages are.

    As a rule of thumb, use The Golden Sentences as your guiding map before you choose the vehicle (the method). It will help you achieve your goals in half the time.

    Difficulty Level for the Most Common Languages

    Now let’s dive into dissecting what’s the easiest language to learn for English speakers.

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    We profiled each of the languages we’ll mention into the following categories:

    • Speaking: This is based on the ease with which learners are able to pick up the sounds and vocabulary of this language.
    • Grammar: Used as a criterion when ranking a given language as easy, moderately easy, or difficult to acquire.
    • Writing: In many languages, learning to speak first and write later makes the journey easier. Other languages are equally easy to speak and write. This item spells out the easiest languages to write alongside the most difficult.

    We’ve decided to rank the order of the languages from easiest to hardest to learn.

    1. Spanish

    • Speaking: Very Easy
    • Grammar: Very Easy
    • Writing: Easy
    • Overall: Very Easy

    We can be thankful that Spanish pronunciations are one of the easiest for English speakers to learn.

    Overall, Spanish has a shallow orthographic depth, meaning that most words are written as pronounced. This means that reading and writing in Spanish is a straightforward task.

    There are only ten vowel and diphthong sounds (English has 20), and no unfamiliar phonemes except for the fun-to-pronounce letter ñ. This makes learning how to speak Spanish the easiest out of the bunch and may give you the best return on your time and investment, as 37 per cent of employers rated Spanish as a critical language to know for employment[3].

    2. Italian

    • Speaking: Easy
    • Grammar: Easy
    • Writing: Moderately Easy
    • Overall: Easy

    Italian is the most “romantic” of the romance languages. Luckily, its Latin-rooted vocabulary includes many cognates with English, such as foresta (forest), calendario (calendar), and ambizioso (ambitious), making it a fairly easy language to learn overall.

    Like Spanish, learning Italian is made easier by the fact that many of the words in Italian are written as pronounced. Moreover, the Italian sentence structure is highly rhythmic, with most words ending in vowels. This adds a musicality to the spoken language, which makes it fairly simple to understand, and a spunky language to use.

    3. French

    • Speaking: Moderate
    • Grammar: Moderate
    • Writing: Moderately Easy
    • Overall: Moderate

    Despite how different French may appear at first, linguists estimate that French has influenced up to a third of the modern English language.

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    This may also explain why French’s Latin derivations make much of the vocabulary familiar to English speakers (edifice, royal, village). There are also more verb forms (17, compared to the English 12) and gendered nouns (le crayon, la table).

    However, pronunciation in French is especially difficult, with vowel sounds and silent letters that you may not be used to in English.

    4. Portuguese

    • Speaking: Moderate
    • Grammar: Moderate
    • Writing: Moderate
    • Overall: Moderate

    With the Brazilian economy ranking 6th in the world, Portuguese has become a powerful language to learn. One great element of the language is that interrogatives are fairly easy, expressed by intonation alone (“You Like This?”). If you can create a sentence in Portuguese, you can ask a question. What’s more, in Brazilian Portuguese, there’s one catch all question tag form: não é.

    The main difficulty with the pronunciation is the nasal vowel sounds that require some practice.

    5. German

    • Speaking: Difficult
    • Grammar: Moderate
    • Writing: Moderate
    • Overall: Moderately Difficult

    For many English speakers, German is a difficult language to pick up. Its long words, four noun case endings, and rough pronunciation gives your tongue quite the work out each time you speak.

    German is recognized as a very descriptive language. A good example is how they use the noun by combining the object with the action at hand.

    Example: das Fernsehen – the television, combines the words fern (far), and sehen (watching), literally far-watching.

    On the other hand, German can be a fun language to learn, and its use of grammar is considered to be quite logical, with many overlapping words in English. Just watch out for the exceptions to the rules!

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    6. Hindi

    • Speaking: Moderate
    • Grammar: Moderately Difficult
    • Writing: Difficult
    • Overall: Moderately Difficult

    There are many familiar words in English that are either Hindi or of Hindi origin. For example guru, jungle, karma, yoga, bungalow, cheetah, looting, thug, and avatar.

    Hindi also uses lots of English words. They are read and pronounced as they are in English, but are written in Hindi. For example, डॉक्टर is pronounced doctor and स्टेशन is pronounced station.

    This shows that while learning the vocabulary and pronunciation of Hindi may not to be too difficult due to its similarity to English, writing in Hindi is a different ball game.

    7. Mandarin

    • Speaking: Difficult
    • Grammar: Difficult
    • Writing: Very Difficult
    • Overall: Very Difficult

    We mainly put Mandarin here to show you the contrasting difference between what’s the easiest language to learn (Spanish) and the hardest language to learn for English speakers.

    While language learners won’t struggle as much on the grammar, mastering the tones can be very difficult. Mandarin is a tonal language, which means the pitch or intonation used when a word is spoken impacts its meaning. For example, tang with a high tone means soup, but tang with a rising tone means sugar.

    Learning Mandarin has its rewards though, providing cultural insights and knowledge. However, according to the BBC, you’ll need to memorize over 2,000 characters to read a Chinese newspaper![4]

    What’s the Easiest Language to Learn?

    Winner: Spanish

    The clear winner for the easiest language to learn for native English speakers is Spanish. Everything from writing, grammar, and speaking will come more naturally to the English speaker: similar rules, structure, and Latin roots.

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    It’ll be like going from playing football to ultimate Frisbee.

    More Language Learning Tips

    Featured photo credit: Priscilla Du Preez via unsplash.com

    Reference

    More by this author

    Sean Kim

    Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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    Last Updated on January 5, 2022

    How to Deal With Anger (The Ultimate Anger Management Guide)

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    How to Deal With Anger (The Ultimate Anger Management Guide)

    We all lose our temper from time to time, and expressing anger is actually a healthy thing to do in our relationships with others. Expressing our differences in opinion allows us to have healthy conflict and many times come to an agreement or understanding that works for everyone. However, there are times when anger can become overwhelming or damaging, and during these times, it’s important to learn how to deal with anger.

    Expressing anger inappropriately can be harmful to relationships, both personal and professional. You may express too much anger, too often, or at times that are only going to make things worse, not better. In this article we will look at anger management techniques that will help you better control your emotions.

    Let’s take a deeper look at how to deal with anger.

    Expressing Anger

    Anger is a natural and normal part of almost any relationship. This includes relationships with your significant other, kids, boss, friends, family, etc. Anger provides us with valuable information if we are willing to listen to it. It clues us in to areas where we disagree with others and things that need to be changed or altered.

    Unhealthy Ways to Express Anger

    Here are some common yet unhealthy ways to express anger that you should avoid:

    Being Passive-Aggressive

    This is a term many of us are familiar with. Passive-aggressive behavior happens when someone is angry but uses indirect communication to express their anger.

    Some of the more common passive-aggressive behaviors include the silent treatment, making comments about someone behind their back, being grumpy, moody, or pouting, or simply not doing tasks or assignments that they should.

    This is a passive-aggressive person’s way of showing their anger. It’s not very productive but extremely common.

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    Poorly-Timed

    Some people get overwhelmed and express anger in a situation where it can’t really do any good.

    An example would be getting angry at one person in front of a crowd of people. All that does is make people uncomfortable and shuts them down. It’s not a healthy way to express anger or disagreement with someone.

    Ongoing Anger

    Being angry all the time is most often a symptom of something else. It’s healthy and normal to express anger when you disagree with someone. However, if someone is angry most of the time and always seems to be expressing their anger to everyone around them, this won’t serve them well.

    Over time, people will start to avoid this person and have as little contact as possible. The reason being is no one likes being around someone who is angry all the time; it’s a no-win situation.

    Healthy Ways to Express Anger

    What about the healthy ways[1] to adapt? When learning how to deal with anger, here are some healthy ways to get you started.

    Being Honest

    Express your anger or disagreement honestly. Be truthful about what it is that is making you angry. Sometimes this will entail walking away and thinking about it for a bit before you respond.

    Don’t say you’re mad at something someone did or said when it’s really something else that upset you.

    Being Direct

    Similar to being honest, being direct is a healthy way to express anger.

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    Don’t talk around something that is making you angry. Don’t say that one thing is making you angry when it’s really something else, and don’t stack items on top of each other so you can unload on someone about 10 different things 6 months from now.

    Be direct and upfront about what is making you angry. Ensure you are expressing your anger to the person who upset you or you are angry at, not to someone else. This is very counterproductive.

    Being Timely

    When something makes you angry, it’s much better to express it in a timely manner. Don’t keep it bottled up inside of you, as that’s only going to do more harm than good.

    Think of the marriages that seem to go up in flames out of nowhere when the reality is someone kept quiet for years until they hit their breaking point.

    Expressing anger as it occurs is a much healthier way of using anger to help us guide our relationships in the moment.

    How to Deal With Anger

    If you feel angry, how should you deal with it right at that moment?

    1. Slow Down

    From time to time, I receive an email at work that makes me so angry that steam is probably pouring out of my ears.

    In my less restrained moments, I have been known to fire off a quick response, and that typically has ended about as well as you might imagine.

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    When I actually walk away from my computer and go do something else for a while, I am able to calm down and think more rationally. After that happens, I am able to respond in a more appropriate and productive manner. Doing things that helps you learn how to release anger can make an uncomfortable situation more manageable before it gets out of hand.

    2. Focus on the “I”

    Remember that you are the one that’s upset. Don’t accuse people of making you upset because, in the end, it’s your response to what someone did that really triggered your anger. You don’t want to place blame by saying something like “Why don’t you ever put away your dishes?” Say something more like “Having dirty dishes laying on the counter upsets me—can you work with me to come to a solution?”

    When you are accusatory towards someone, all that does is increase the tension. This doesn’t usually do anything except make your anger rise higher.

    3. Work out

    When learning how to deal with anger, exercise is a great outlet. If something happens that angers you, see if you have the opportunity to burn off some of the anger.

    Being able to hit the gym to get a hard workout in is great. If this isn’t an option, see if you can go for a run or a bike ride. If you are at work when you become angry and the weather permits, at least go outside for a brisk walk.

    Besides working some of your anger out through exercise, this also helps to give your mind a chance to work through some ways to address what it is that upset you.

    4. Seek Help When Needed

    There are times when we could all use some help. Life can be stressful and overwhelming. It’s perfectly fine to seek some help from a mental health professional if it will help you get back to a healthy balance.If you find that you are angry all the time, it might be a good idea to go talk to an expert about learning to control intense emotions. They can give you some sound advice and ideas on how to get your anger to a more manageable and healthy level.

    5. Practice Relaxation

    We all seem to lead incredibly busy lives, and that’s a good thing if we are loving the life we are living. That being said, it is very beneficial to our physical and mental well-being to take time out for relaxation.

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    That can mean spending time doing things that help us calm down and relax, like being around people we enjoy, practicing deep breathing or listening to music. It could be making time for things that help bring us balance like a healthy diet and physical activity.

    Many people incorporate techniques such as yoga and meditation to calm their minds and release tension when learning how to deal with anger. Whatever your choice is, ensure you take time out to relax when warning signs of anger start to bubble up.

    6. Laugh

    Incorporating humor and laughter on a regular basis will help keep anger in check and help you get over a bad mood and feelings of anger more quickly. This isn’t part of formal anger management techniques, but you’ll be surprised by how well it works. Remember, life is a journey that’s meant to be enjoyed fully along the way through healthy emotion. Make sure you take time to laugh and have fun.Surround yourself with people that like to laugh and enjoy life. Don’t work at a job that just causes you stress, which can lead to anger. Work at something you enjoy doing.

    7. Be Grateful

    It’s easy to focus on the bad in life and the things that cause us negative emotions. It’s vitally important to remind ourselves of all the wonderful things in life that bring us positive emotions, things that we easily forget because we get caught up in the whirlwind of day to day life.

    Take time out each day to remind yourself of a few things you are grateful for in order to help you learn how to release anger and invite in more positive feelings.

    Final Thoughts

    Life can be overwhelming at times. We seem to have constant pressure to achieve more and to always be on the go or motivated. People we are around and situations we are in can cause stress, anger, and negative emotions. At times, it can seem to be too much, and we get angry and our emotions start to get out of control.

    During these times, keep in mind that life is an incredible journey, full of wonder and things that bring you joy. When you find yourself angry more often than is healthy, take time out to remember the good things in life—the things that we seem to forget yet bring us so much positive energy and emotions.

    Use some of the tips included here to help with how to deal with anger and better control your emotions.

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    More Resources on Anger Management

    Featured photo credit: Andre Hunter via unsplash.com

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