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How to Choose a Good Bottle of Wine That is Worthy of Your Taste Buds

How to Choose a Good Bottle of Wine That is Worthy of Your Taste Buds

Going shopping for wine when you don’t know what you’re looking for is nothing less than a grueling task. There are so many options that it would be no surprise to walk out empty-handed. Using this guide, hopefully you’ll feel better equipped to choose the one that suits your taste, budget, and occasion.

Pricing

A decent bottle of wine doesn’t have to come at an outrageous price. Think of the occasion and choose accordingly. If the event includes people that you are trying to impress, opt for something on the higher end of affordable, and if you’re just having supper in with some friends that already know your dirty secrets, cheap wine is totally acceptable. Most of the time expensive wines are overpriced anyway, so opting for a mid-range bottle is a good call.

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Red Wine

There is no correct way to choose a wine because it all depends on personal style. One misconception is that you can’t drink red wine with fish. This isn’t true, but keep in mind that it needs to be something soft like a Pinot Noir, which can also be served with chicken. Anything stronger than this can make the wine taste metallic. Drinking red wine chilled is also acceptable. Choose something like Cotes du Rhone or Beaujolais and put in the refrigerator 30 minutes before opening it. If serving spicy food choose a soft and fruity wine like an Australian or Chilean red and Lamb goes best with Rioja.

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Choose a wine from Chile, Australia, or California when pairing with steak. Vintage wines don’t have a great guideline, because there are too many variables. These wines deserve expert advice, so do your research.

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Pinks

Rosé comes in two main styles, sweet Californian and dry. It is difficult to tell them apart only by color, as they all produce different colors which are not an indication of flavor. A white Zinfandel indicates a sweet California style. The grape is what is responsible for the sweet flavor and it is best had when chilled alongside a bowl of strawberries, with dessert, or an Asian dish. A dry rosé is fruity and floral, and taste a bit silky. The best come from New Zealand, Chile, Australia, and France. Look for a dry rosé that is a Pinot Noir, Shiraz, or Cabernet. Additionally, it is best to match a dry rosé with the food that is pink colored like salmon, tuna, or prawns.

White Wine

Generally for vintage white and rosé, don’t choose anything older than 2009. The taste of the fruit tends to go flat. Salmon and other richer fish dishes go best with Chardonnay. Sauvignon Blanc has a clean, tropical taste that works well with the seafood. Sauvignon Blanc and Riesling should be served with Oriental food like Thai, because the food has enough zest to counter the sweet and sour flavors. For a barbecue, a white from South Africa, Chile, New Zealand, Australia, or North America will be sufficient. This is because they are not traditional wine making countries in Europe. White wines from France go great with muscles, and Pinot Grigio goes well with seafood or risotto.

When choosing a bottle of wine, a cork or screw-top is not the ultimate battle in determining cheap wine from expensive wine. Sometimes a screw-top is just more practical. Think of packing a picnic and buying a bottle of wine on the way to the park and realizing there is no corkscrew. With the screw-top lid this is no problem at all. Keep this in mind when choosing the bottle of wine, along with the budget and the occasion.

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Last Updated on May 15, 2019

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

How to Tap Into the Power of Positivity

As it appears, the human mind is not capable of not thinking, at least on the subconscious level. Our mind is always occupied by thoughts, whether we want to or not, and they influence our every action.

“Happiness cannot come from without, it comes from within.” – Helen Keller

When we are still children, our thoughts seem to be purely positive. Have you ever been around a 4-year old who doesn’t like a painting he or she drew? I haven’t. Instead, I see glee, exciting and pride in children’s eyes. But as the years go by, we clutter our mind with doubts, fears and self-deprecating thoughts.

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Just imagine then how much we limit ourselves in every aspect of our lives if we give negative thoughts too much power! We’ll never go after that job we’ve always wanted because our nay-saying thoughts make us doubt our abilities. We’ll never ask that person we like out on a date because we always think we’re not good enough.

We’ll never risk quitting our job in order to pursue the life and the work of our dreams because we can’t get over our mental barrier that insists we’re too weak, too unimportant and too dumb. We’ll never lose those pounds that risk our health because we believe we’re not capable of pushing our limits. We’ll never be able to fully see our inner potential because we simply don’t dare to question the voices in our head.

But enough is enough! It’s time to stop these limiting beliefs and come to a place of sanity, love and excitement about life, work and ourselves.

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So…how exactly are we to achieve that?

It’s not as hard as it may seem; you just have to practice, practice, practice. Here are a few ideas on how you can get started.

1. Learn to substitute every negative thought with a positive one.

Every time a negative thought crawls into your mind, replace it with a positive thought. It’s just like someone writes a phrase you don’t like on a blackboard and then you get up, erase it and write something much more to your liking.

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2. See the positive side of every situation, even when you are surrounded by pure negativity.

This one is a bit harder to put into practice, which does not mean it’s impossible.

You can find positivity in everything by mentally holding on to something positive, whether this be family, friends, your faith, nature, someone’s sparkling eyes or whatever other glimmer of beauty. If you seek it, you will find it.

3. At least once a day, take a moment and think of 5 things you are grateful for.

This will lighten your mood and give you some perspective of what is really important in life and how many blessings surround you already.

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4. Change the mental images you allow to enter your mind.

How you see yourself and your surroundings make a huge difference to your thinking. It is like watching a DVD that saddens and frustrates you, completely pulling you down. Eject that old DVD, throw it away and insert a new, better, more hopeful one instead.

So, instead of dwelling on dark, negative thoughts, consciously build and focus on positive, light and colorful images, thoughts and situations in your mind a few times a day.

If you are persistent and keep on working on yourself, your mind will automatically reject its negative thoughts and welcome the positive ones.

And remember: You are (or will become) what you think you are. This is reason enough to be proactive about whatever is going on in your head.

Featured photo credit: Kyaw Tun via unsplash.com

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