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How Adding Lavender To Lemonade Can Relieve Pain And Anxiety

How Adding Lavender To Lemonade Can Relieve Pain And Anxiety

Lavender lemonade is more than just beautiful to look at and refreshing to drink on a hot summer afternoon. The changes this humble drink can make to your overall sense of well-being will astound and surprise you. You will find that just by adding this drink to your diet you can make positive changes to your outlook and approach to life.

Lavender being used as a medicinal herb can be traced back to early civilization. Greek naturalist, Dioscorides, commended the medical attributes of lavender in the first century A.D. In contemporary times, lavender has once again achieved great popularity for its potential medical benefits.

It is now widely accepted that lavender can help reduce anxiety, elevate the symptoms of depression, and act as a sleeping aid. So if you are feeling anxious, or down, or not sleeping well, lavender lemonade may just be the solution to your problems. A closer look at some research will allow us to see the effect that lavender can have when taken orally.

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Recipe: Lavender Lemonade with Lavender Essential Oil

Ingredients:

1 cup raw honey

12 cups pure water

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1 drop lavender essential oil

6 lemons, peeled and juiced

Lavender springs for garnish

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Directions:

Mix all ingredients together and chill. Add more water or raw honey if needed.

Studies supporting the oral use of lavender to reduce symptoms of anxiety

  1. A study conducted by Dr. Siegfriend Kasper, Prof., MD, from the Medical University of Vienna, looks at how effective lavandula oil (silexan) may be for patients with generalized anxiety disorder and sybsyndromal anxiety. The study titled “An orally administered lavandula oil preparation (Silexan) for anxiety disorder and related conditions: an evidence based review” was published in the International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice. Dr. Kasper concluded “Silexan had beneficial effects on typical co-morbidity symptoms of anxiety disorders, for example, disturbed sleep, somatic complaints, or decreased quality of life. Except for mild gastrointestinal symptoms, the drug was devoid of adverse effects and did not cause drug interactions or withdrawal symptoms at daily doses of 80 or 160 mg.”
  1. In a study conducted by Bradley BF, Et al. published in Hum psychopharmacol, 97 healthy participants were orally administered lavender capsules (100 ml and 200 ml). Film clips were then used to elicit anxiety. Various methods were used to measure the level of anxiety in the participants. Some participants were given lavender capsules, while others were given placebo capsules. They then watched a neutral film clip, an anxiety-provoking clip, and a light-hearted clip. The authors concluded that lavender helped to reduce anxiety under conditions of low anxiety. However, they were unable to draw conclusions about clinical anxiety disorders.

Other uses of lavender

  1. Lavender is used for a variety of digestive complaints including: meteorism (abdominal swelling from gas in the intestinal or peritoneal cavity), vomiting, nausea, loss of appetite, and upset stomach.
  1. Lavender can also be used for pain relief for conditions including: migraines, headaches, and toothaches. It is also useful in the treatment of muscular aches, rheumatism, backaches, and tense muscles. A massage with lavender oil can also give one relief from pain in the joints.
  1. Lavender may be applied to the skin for hair loss (alopecia areata). Using lavender as a treatment for alopecia areata is considered possibly effective by The Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database (NMCB). There is evidence that lavender can promote hair growth by up to 44 percent after 7 months of treatment.
  1. A study published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology found that lavender oil may be very effective in treating antifungal-resistant infections.
  1. According to dermatologists and aromatherapists, lavender essential oil is beneficial in the treatment of acne. Lavender oil inhibits the initial bacterial infection and can reduce signs of scarring left by the acne.
  1. Lavender oil is widely used for various respiratory problems including: flu, cough, throat infections, cold, sinus congestion, tonsillitis, and laryngitis. The oil can either be used in the form of vapor or applied on the skin of the chest, neck, and back.

Summation

Factoring lavender into your diet may not always be that easy, but mixing up a jug of lavender lemonade to go with an afternoon snack is quick and simple. Plus, it may prove to be very pleasurable. Making lavender lemonade a part of your routine may eliminate some of those unwanted worries and thoughts.

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Featured photo credit: Working moms against guilt via workingmomsagainstguilt.com

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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