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Science Says Vegetarians Are More Intelligent And Empathetic

Science Says Vegetarians Are More Intelligent And Empathetic

It’s been a long time since you’ve stopped responding to the stupid question, “Really, you don’t eat meat–not even chicken?” You aren’t even annoyed anymore by comments about your fussy eating habits and about how “unnatural” it is to not eat meat. You just let it go, knowing your vegetarian diet is your choice.

It seems vegetarians may have the last laugh! Recent studies show that individuals with higher intelligence are more likely to become vegetarians. Using 11 different cognitive tests at three pre-16 ages researchers have found people who choose meatless diets are more intelligent than their omnivorous friends.

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Among the respondents to a UK Child Development Study, those who were vegetarian at age 42 had significantly higher general childhood intelligence than those who were not vegetarian at the same age. Women who choose not to eat meat have a mean childhood IQ of 108.0; those who aren’t vegetarian have a mean childhood IQ of 100.7. Male omnivores have a mean childhood IQ of 101.1, whereas men who choose vegetarianism have a mean childhood IQ of 111.0. That’s a 10-point difference in IQ!

Another scientific theory, Savanna-IQ Interaction Hypothesis, supports the correlation between a vegetarian diet and higher intelligence. Satoshi Kanzawa, an evolutionary psychologist, suggests the ability to change personal habits in reply to challenges in the world is strongest in people with higher empathy and intelligence levels. There is a strict link between a person’s ability to easily adapt their habits to “evolutionary novels” and higher IQ.

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Intelligent people cope more easily with situations that did not exist in the ancestral environment (such as modern dietary options). While our ancestors had to face constant food scarcity, we often face the opposite problem: abundance. Intelligent people are more likely to make wiser choices about what they eat, considering both their own health and animal welfare issues.

Vegetarians have found that they don’t need to eat meat to have a balanced diet and maintain body and brain health. Researchers at Harvard University found that vegetarians can get enough protein from non-meat foods, like vegetables, whole grains, lentils, beans, nuts, seeds, fruits, and soy products. A well-balanced vegetarian diet actually provides TWICE the amount of protein we need!

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Researchers from the British Medical Journal have also recently published a study which describes how a fruit and vegetable-rich vegetarian diet can even boost brain power! At the same time, meat-eaters have a higher incidence of obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and other serious health problems.

Paying attention to what we eat is more than just how to satisfy your stomach and cravings, but also about sustainability. Our world simply won’t sustain the current rates of meat consumption. About 30% of the world’s total ice-free surface is used to feed the chickens, pigs, and cattle we eat. The expansion of meat production, of which beef is the biggest culprit, was the main cause of deforestation over the last two decades. Experts list it as the second-biggest environmental threat to the human species after fossil-fuel vehicles.

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Sure, even while being aware of the negative impact of meat on the environment you can still sometimes dig into your favorite burger–when you really feel like it. It is all about the quality and the quantity of what you eat, not necessarily quitting meat totally. No matter what type of diet you choose it’s definitely worth using your intelligence and develop empathy to keep the negative impact of your nutritional choices at the minimum level–not just mindlessly following your whims.

Getting more informed and tracing where your food comes from and what impact your consumption has on your environment can help you to optimize your nutritional choices. And these are the essential ones, because what you put on your plate is a decision you make at least three times a day.

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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