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Infographic: The Ultimate Car Repair Cheat Sheet

Infographic: The Ultimate Car Repair Cheat Sheet
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You are pretty sure that your battery needs replacing, but you have no idea how much it will cost and how long it will take to get it done. So, you are unsure whether you should take your car to a garage right away or wait till the weekend. Or should you even attempt to do it yourself?

Owning a vehicle is a big responsibility; you often find yourself asking questions like these.

The infographic below created by Buy Auto Parts provides you the ultimate guide to knowing the level of time commitment, the cost of parts and tool kit necessary for any car repair work on your vehicle.

Infographic

    The key points in the infographic can be summarized below.

    Replace wiper blades

    Replacing your wiper blades is cheap and easy. It does not take much time and can be replaced using tools you can find easily in your home.

    Replace air filters

    A properly working air filter keeps debris out of your fuel tank.  Dirt and muck in the oil tank may require cleaning of the fuel tank which is expensive and time consuming.

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    Replace headlight bulb

    You can easily change your headlights using a screw driver in no time.

    Change oil

    Oil protects the moving parts from wear and tear. Dirty oil may even destroy your engine. So replacing oil on a regular basis is an essential part of keeping your vehicle well-functioning.

    Install air intake

    Air intake installation is highly recommended because it provides greater fuel economy, an increased acceleration and overall increase in performance. It takes about two hours and can be quite expensive but is well worth your time and money.

    Replace air plugs

    Damaged and worn out spark plugs can cause serious problems such as misfires, poor fuel economy and increased emissions. Ensure you are using OEM compatible plugs.

    Change tires

    Changing your tires is necessary for safety, performance and efficiency. You should learn how to change your tires. It is simple and doesn’t require much time.

    Replace starter

    Your car won’t start with a damaged starter. Make sure it is receiving steady power flow once installed.

    Replace battery

    If the electrical components of your vehicle (headlights, radio, starter, etc.) start showing problems, there may be problems with your battery. Changing a battery is a quick and easy job in most cars and vans and can be done with minimal tools.

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    Replace cooling fan

    Cooling fans are an important part of your cooling system. Ensure the fans are not damaged if you’re working on your radiator.

    Change brake pads

    Maintenance and replacement of your brake pads is an obligatory measure of security. In addition, use of thinning, worn out brake pads may damage your rotors which are expensive.  If you’re getting new rotors or calipers, always confirm that the brake pads are in good condition.

    Change brake rotors

    If you are having problems with braking despite well-functioning brake pads, it is time to check on the brake rotors. Change damaged rotors as early as possible to avoid difficulty of changing old rotors.

    Replace alternator

    If your alternators are failing you won’t be able to charge your batteries properly, so you will have trouble with electrical components in your vehicle. If you have a good battery, but are unable to power your electrical components, take a look at the alternator. This is a tough task and will require specialist knowledge.

    Replace ignition switch

    When the ignition switch is damaged, your car may not start and other accessories will not work. Fixing a switch can be a quick, simple task (for dashboard switch) or a lethargic, challenging one (for steering column switch).

    Install navigation system

    Paper maps are a thing of the past. A navigation system may be expensive but it will help you find directions easily compared to traditional approaches.

    Replace wheel hub

    Check your hubs for any signs of rust and corrosion, and replace them if necessary.

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    Replace radiator

    The radiator is a critical part of your car’s cooling system. A poorly performing radiator could be the cause of your car’s excessive heating.

    Replace shocks and struts

    Shocks and struts must be in tip-top condition if you want to enjoy a smooth ride. Symptoms of damaged shocks and struts include difficulty in turning, bouncing and squeaking over bumps. Replacing them can be a tough, time consuming job in absence of proper tools.

    Replace catalytic converter

    Catalytic converters filter harmful toxic fumes from your vehicles before emission. They usually last the lifetime of your vehicle. However physical damage and certain additives in fuels can prematurely age the converters.

    Replace oil pans

    Debris, rust, slush and other substances can damage your oil pan. Damaged oil pans can cause oil leakage which can severely damage the engine. Ensure that you inspect for damage in oil pans every time you change the oil.

    Replace fuel pumps

    The fuel pump is responsible for pumping gas from fuel tank to engine. A completely damaged fuel pump will bring your vehicle to a halt. Fuel pumps do not usually get damaged, but when they do, be prepared to splash a lot of cash to get it fixed.

    Replace water pumps

    Water pumps circulate fluid whenever the engine is running to cool the hot engine. It is a crucial part of the cooling system. Replacing water pumps is very difficult and will need expert handling.

    Replacing hybrid batteries 

    If you have a hybrid car, you may need to change your hybrid battery packs when your car has put has had enough mileage. Hybrid batteries are very expensive and more challenging to replace than usual batteries.

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    Replace turbocharger

    Installing a turbocharger can add more power to your engine but it comes at an expensive price. It is an arduous process that demands an experienced mechanic.

    Replace steering racks

    If you have trouble turning your car around, the problem may be in the steering rack. Steering rack replacement is a laborious and costly process.

    Replace clutch

    Every clutch needs replacement at some point in time. Symptoms of failing clutches include gear slippage and unwanted shifting. While you can replace clutches yourself, you will need to devote about an entire day for it.

    Replace A/C

    Driving with an A/C adds comfort to your ride. If the temperature through the A/C vents is not as cold as they should be, you should get it inspected.

    Change timing belt

    Breaking the timing belt could result in major engine failure. Therefore, regular servicing of your timing belt is necessary to avoid its failure. Checking your timing belt every 75,000 miles is highly recommended.

    Repair transmission

    Problems in transmissions should be taken very seriously and should be dealt with as early as possible.  If any problems exist, get a highly skilled mechanic to fix them. In addition make sure to replace gearbox oil or transmission fluid every 50,000 miles.

    Featured photo credit: Vehicle of Estonian President via en.wikipedia.org

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    More by this author

    Nabin Paudyal

    Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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    Last Updated on July 21, 2021

    The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

    The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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    No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

    Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

    Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

    A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

    Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

    In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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    From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

    A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

    For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

    This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

    The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

    That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

    Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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    The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

    Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

    But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

    The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

    The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

    A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

    For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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    But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

    If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

    For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

    These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

    For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

    How to Make a Reminder Works for You

    Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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    Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

    Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

    My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

    Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

    I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

    More on Building Habits

    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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    Reference

    [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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