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Infographic: The Ultimate Car Repair Cheat Sheet

Infographic: The Ultimate Car Repair Cheat Sheet

You are pretty sure that your battery needs replacing, but you have no idea how much it will cost and how long it will take to get it done. So, you are unsure whether you should take your car to a garage right away or wait till the weekend. Or should you even attempt to do it yourself?

Owning a vehicle is a big responsibility; you often find yourself asking questions like these.

The infographic below created by Buy Auto Parts provides you the ultimate guide to knowing the level of time commitment, the cost of parts and tool kit necessary for any car repair work on your vehicle.

Infographic

    The key points in the infographic can be summarized below.

    Replace wiper blades

    Replacing your wiper blades is cheap and easy. It does not take much time and can be replaced using tools you can find easily in your home.

    Replace air filters

    A properly working air filter keeps debris out of your fuel tank.  Dirt and muck in the oil tank may require cleaning of the fuel tank which is expensive and time consuming.

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    Replace headlight bulb

    You can easily change your headlights using a screw driver in no time.

    Change oil

    Oil protects the moving parts from wear and tear. Dirty oil may even destroy your engine. So replacing oil on a regular basis is an essential part of keeping your vehicle well-functioning.

    Install air intake

    Air intake installation is highly recommended because it provides greater fuel economy, an increased acceleration and overall increase in performance. It takes about two hours and can be quite expensive but is well worth your time and money.

    Replace air plugs

    Damaged and worn out spark plugs can cause serious problems such as misfires, poor fuel economy and increased emissions. Ensure you are using OEM compatible plugs.

    Change tires

    Changing your tires is necessary for safety, performance and efficiency. You should learn how to change your tires. It is simple and doesn’t require much time.

    Replace starter

    Your car won’t start with a damaged starter. Make sure it is receiving steady power flow once installed.

    Replace battery

    If the electrical components of your vehicle (headlights, radio, starter, etc.) start showing problems, there may be problems with your battery. Changing a battery is a quick and easy job in most cars and vans and can be done with minimal tools.

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    Replace cooling fan

    Cooling fans are an important part of your cooling system. Ensure the fans are not damaged if you’re working on your radiator.

    Change brake pads

    Maintenance and replacement of your brake pads is an obligatory measure of security. In addition, use of thinning, worn out brake pads may damage your rotors which are expensive.  If you’re getting new rotors or calipers, always confirm that the brake pads are in good condition.

    Change brake rotors

    If you are having problems with braking despite well-functioning brake pads, it is time to check on the brake rotors. Change damaged rotors as early as possible to avoid difficulty of changing old rotors.

    Replace alternator

    If your alternators are failing you won’t be able to charge your batteries properly, so you will have trouble with electrical components in your vehicle. If you have a good battery, but are unable to power your electrical components, take a look at the alternator. This is a tough task and will require specialist knowledge.

    Replace ignition switch

    When the ignition switch is damaged, your car may not start and other accessories will not work. Fixing a switch can be a quick, simple task (for dashboard switch) or a lethargic, challenging one (for steering column switch).

    Install navigation system

    Paper maps are a thing of the past. A navigation system may be expensive but it will help you find directions easily compared to traditional approaches.

    Replace wheel hub

    Check your hubs for any signs of rust and corrosion, and replace them if necessary.

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    Replace radiator

    The radiator is a critical part of your car’s cooling system. A poorly performing radiator could be the cause of your car’s excessive heating.

    Replace shocks and struts

    Shocks and struts must be in tip-top condition if you want to enjoy a smooth ride. Symptoms of damaged shocks and struts include difficulty in turning, bouncing and squeaking over bumps. Replacing them can be a tough, time consuming job in absence of proper tools.

    Replace catalytic converter

    Catalytic converters filter harmful toxic fumes from your vehicles before emission. They usually last the lifetime of your vehicle. However physical damage and certain additives in fuels can prematurely age the converters.

    Replace oil pans

    Debris, rust, slush and other substances can damage your oil pan. Damaged oil pans can cause oil leakage which can severely damage the engine. Ensure that you inspect for damage in oil pans every time you change the oil.

    Replace fuel pumps

    The fuel pump is responsible for pumping gas from fuel tank to engine. A completely damaged fuel pump will bring your vehicle to a halt. Fuel pumps do not usually get damaged, but when they do, be prepared to splash a lot of cash to get it fixed.

    Replace water pumps

    Water pumps circulate fluid whenever the engine is running to cool the hot engine. It is a crucial part of the cooling system. Replacing water pumps is very difficult and will need expert handling.

    Replacing hybrid batteries 

    If you have a hybrid car, you may need to change your hybrid battery packs when your car has put has had enough mileage. Hybrid batteries are very expensive and more challenging to replace than usual batteries.

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    Replace turbocharger

    Installing a turbocharger can add more power to your engine but it comes at an expensive price. It is an arduous process that demands an experienced mechanic.

    Replace steering racks

    If you have trouble turning your car around, the problem may be in the steering rack. Steering rack replacement is a laborious and costly process.

    Replace clutch

    Every clutch needs replacement at some point in time. Symptoms of failing clutches include gear slippage and unwanted shifting. While you can replace clutches yourself, you will need to devote about an entire day for it.

    Replace A/C

    Driving with an A/C adds comfort to your ride. If the temperature through the A/C vents is not as cold as they should be, you should get it inspected.

    Change timing belt

    Breaking the timing belt could result in major engine failure. Therefore, regular servicing of your timing belt is necessary to avoid its failure. Checking your timing belt every 75,000 miles is highly recommended.

    Repair transmission

    Problems in transmissions should be taken very seriously and should be dealt with as early as possible.  If any problems exist, get a highly skilled mechanic to fix them. In addition make sure to replace gearbox oil or transmission fluid every 50,000 miles.

    Featured photo credit: Vehicle of Estonian President via en.wikipedia.org

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    Nabin Paudyal

    Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

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    Last Updated on March 21, 2019

    11 Important Things to Remember When Changing Habits

    11 Important Things to Remember When Changing Habits

    Most gurus talk about habits in a way that doesn’t help you:

    You need to push yourself more. You can’t be lazy. You need to wake up at 5 am. You need more motivation. You can never fail…blah blah “insert more gibberish here.”

    But let me share with you the unconventional truths I found out:

    To build and change habits, you don’t need motivation or wake up at 5 am. Heck, you can fail multiple times, be lazy, have no motivation and still pull it off with ease.

    It’s quite simple and easy to do, especially with the following list I’m going to show to you. But remember, Jim Rohn used to say,

    “What is simple and easy to do is also simple and easy not to do.”

    The important things to remember when changing your habits are both simple and easy, just don’t think that they don’t make any difference because they do.

    In fact, they are the only things that make a difference.

    Let’s see what those small things are, shall we?

    1. Start Small

    The biggest mistake I see people doing with habits is by going big. You don’t go big…ever. You start small with your habits.

    Want to grow a book reading habit? Don’t start reading a book a day. Start with 10 pages a day.

    Want to become a writer? Don’t start writing 10,000 words a day. Start with 300 words.

    Want to lose weight? Don’t stop eating ice cream. Eat one less ball of it.

    Whatever it is, you need to start small. Starting big always leads to failure. It has to, because it’s not sustainable.

    Start small. How small? The amount needs to be in your comfort zone. So if you think that reading 20 pages of a book is a bit too much, start with 10 or 5.

    It needs to appear easy and be easy to do.

    Do less today to do more in a year.

    2. Stay Small

    There is a notion of Kaizen which means continuous improvement. They use this notion in habits where they tell you to start with reading 1 page of a book a day and then gradually increase the amount you do over time.

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    But the problem with this approach is the end line — where the “improvement” stops.

    If I go from reading 1 page of a book a day and gradually reach 75 and 100, when do I stop? When I reach 1 book a day? That is just absurd.

    When you start a habit, stay at it in the intensity you have decided. Don’t push yourself for more.

    I started reading 20 pages of a book a day. It’s been more than 2 years now and I’ve read 101 books in that period. There is no way I will increase the number in the future.

    Why?

    Because reading 40 to 50 books a year is enough.

    The same thing applies to every other habit out there.

    Pick a (small) number and stay at it.

    3. Bad Days Are 100 Percent Occurrence

    No matter how great you are, you will have bad days where you won’t do your habit. Period.

    There is no way of going around this. So it’s better to prepare yourself for when that happens instead of thinking that it won’t ever happen.

    What I do when I miss a day of my habit(s) is that I try to bounce back the next day while trying to do habits for both of those days.

    Example for that is if I read 20 pages of a book a day and I miss a day, the next day I will have to read 40 pages of a book. If I miss writing 500 words, the next day I need to write 1000.

    This is a really important point we will discuss later on rewards and punishments.

    This is how I prepare for the bad days when I skip my habit(s) and it’s a model you should take as well.

    4. Those Who Track It, Hack It

    When you track an activity, you can objectively tell what you did in the past days, weeks, months, and years. If you don’t track, you will for sure forget everything you did.

    There are many different ways you can track your activities today, from Habitica to a simple Excel sheet that I use, to even a Whatsapp Tracker.

    Peter Drucker said,

    “What you track is what you do.”

    So track it to do it — it really helps.

    But tracking is accompanied by one more easy activity — measuring.

    5. Measure Once, Do Twice

    Peter Drucker also said,

    “What you measure is what you improve.”

    So alongside my tracker, I have numbers with which I measure doses of daily activities:

    For reading, it’s 20 pages.
    For writing, it’s 500 words.
    For the gym, it’s 1 (I went) or 0 (didn’t go).
    For budgeting, it’s writing down the incomes and expenses.

    Tracking and measuring go hand in hand, they take less than 20 seconds a day but they create so much momentum that it’s unbelievable.

    6. All Days Make a Difference

    Will one day in the gym make you fit? It won’t.

    Will two? They won’t.

    Will three? They won’t.

    Which means that a single gym session won’t make you fit. But after 100 gym sessions, you will look and feel fit.

    What happened? Which one made you fit?

    The answer to this (Sorites paradox)[1] is that no single gym session made you fit, they all did.

    No single day makes a difference, but when combined, they all do. So trust the process and keep on going (small).

    7. They Are Never Fully Automated

    Gurus tell you that habits become automatic. And yes, some of them do, like showering a certain way of brushing your teeth.

    But some habits don’t become automatic, they become a lifestyle.

    What I mean by that is that you won’t automatically “wake up” in the gym and wonder how you got there.

    It will just become a part of your lifestyle.

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    The difference is that you do the first one automatically, without conscious thought, while the other is a part of how you live your life.

    It’s not automatic, but it’s a decision you don’t ponder on or think about — you simply do it.

    It will become easy at a certain point, but they will never become fully automated.

    8. What Got You Here Won’t Get You There

    Marshall Goldsmith has a great book with the same title to it. The phrase means that sometimes, you will need to ditch certain habits to make room for other ones which will bring you to the next step.

    Don’t be afraid to evolve your habits when you sense that they don’t bring you where you want to go.

    When I started reading, it was about reading business and tactic books. But two years into it, I switched to philosophy books which don’t teach me anything “applicable,” but instead teach me how to think.

    The most important ability of the 21st century is the ability to learn, unlearn, and relearn. The strongest tree is the willow tree – not because it has the strongest root or biggest trunk, but because it is flexible enough to endure and sustain anything.

    Be like a willow, adapting to the new ways of doing things.

    9. Set a Goal and Then Forget It

    The most successful of us know what they want to achieve, but they don’t focus on it.

    Sounds paradoxical? You’re right, it does. But here is the logic behind it.

    You need to have a goal of doing something – “I want to become a healthy individual” – and then, you need to reverse engineer how to get there with your habits- “I will go to the gym four times a week.”

    But once you have your goal, you need to “forget” about it and only focus on the process. Because you are working on the process of becoming healthy and it’s always in the making. You will only be as healthy as you take care of your body.

    So you have a goal which isn’t static but keeps on moving.

    If you went to the gym 150 times year and you hit your goal, what would you do then? You would stop going to the gym.

    This is why goal-oriented people experience yo-yo effect[2] and why process-oriented people don’t.

    The difference between process-oriented and goal-oriented people is that the first focus on daily actions while others only focus on the reward at the finish line.

    Set a goal but then forget about it and reap massive awards.

    10. Punish Yourself

    Last two sections are pure Pavlovian – you need to punish bad behavior and reward good behavior. You are the only person who decides what is good and what is bad for you, but when you do, you need to rigorously follow that.

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    I’ve told you in point #3 about bad days and how after one occurs, I do double the work on the next day. That is one of my forms of punishments.

    It’s the need to tell your brain that certain behaviors are unacceptable and that they lead to bad outcomes. That’s what punishments are for.

    You want to tell your brain that there are real consequences to missing your daily habits.[3]

    No favorite food to eat or favorite show to watch or going to the cinema for a new Marvel movie- none, zero, zilch.

    The brain will remember these bad feelings and will try to avoid the behaviors that led to them as much as possible.

    But don’t forget the other side of the same coin.

    11. Reward Yourself

    When you follow and execute on your plan, reward yourself. It’s how the brain knows that you did something good.

    Whenever I finish one of my habits for the day, I open my tracker (who am I kidding, I always keep it open on my desktop) and fill it with a number. As soon as I finish reading 20 pages of a book a day (or a bit more), I open the tracker and write the number down.

    The cell becomes green and gives me an instant boost of endorphin – a great success for the day. Then, it becomes all about not breaking the chain and having as many green fields as possible.

    After 100 days, I crunch some numbers and see how I did.

    If I have less than 10 cheat days, I reward myself with a great meal in a restaurant. You can create your own rewards and they can be daily, weekly, monthly or any arbitrary time table that you create.

    Primoz Bozic, a productivity coach, has gold, silver, and bronze medals as his reward system.[4]

    If you’re having problems creating a system which works for you, contact me via email and we can discuss specifics.

    In the End, It Matters

    What you do matters not only to you but to the people around you.

    When you increase the quality of your life, you indirectly increase the quality of life of people around you. And sometimes, that is all the “motivation” we need to start.

    And that’s the best quote for the end of this article:

    “Motivation gets you started, but habits keep you going.”

    Keep going.

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    More Resources to Help You Build Habits

    Featured photo credit: Anete Lūsiņa via unsplash.com

    Reference

    [1] Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Sorites paradox
    [2] Muscle Zone: What causes yo-yo effect and how to avoid it?
    [3] Growth Habits: 5 Missteps That Cause You To Quit Building A Habit
    [4] Primoz Bozic: The Lean Review: How to Plan Your 2019 in 20 Minutes

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