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Scientists Discover Why You Should Stop Double-Dipping When Dining With Others

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Scientists Discover Why You Should Stop Double-Dipping When Dining With Others

Knock it off already. You think people have noticed the double dipping? They do. And you need to stop. I’m not just saying that because your uptight relative has a huge problem with it. I get it, it’s fun to watch them squirm over this. There are scientific reasons why you need to stop as well as social ones. I have outlined the below. You are welcome.

Who Studied This?

Undergraduates at Clemson University studied double dipping.

How Were The Experiments Conducted?

Bitten crackers and unbitten crackers were studied by students. They measured the amount of bacteria could potentially transfer from the crackers by dipping into a cup of water.

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They found “about 1,000 more bacteria per milliliter of water when crackers were bitten before dipping than solutions where unbitten crackers were dipped.”

It seems like what Mom said was right: germs are everywhere.

A second experiment tested bitten vs. unbitten in water with ph levels typical of food dips. The more acidic solutions were tested after 2 hours and they found that the bacteria lowered from the initial reading immediately after the bite.

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Next different “dips” were tested. Salsa, chocolate, and cheese dips (all different ph levels and thickness.) They tested bacteria in the dips after bitten crackers were dipped and after unbitten crackers were dipped. Additionally they tested hours later to see how the colonies of bacteria faired after time had gone by.

Results

When single dipping there was no detectable amount of bacteria present.

Once double dipping took place there was bacteria and here is how it looked on the different dips:

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Salsa had five times more bacteria (1000 bacteria/ml of dip) compared to chocolate and cheese dips (150-200 bacteria/ml of dip.)

Two hours later the salsa dropped to the same numbers of the chocolate and cheese dips. The acid in salsa helps to kill of bacteria over time.

The original results of more bacteria in salsa is thought to be related to the thickness. The salsa is not as thick as the chocolate and cheese counterparts. This means more dip (salsa) is touching the cracker and falling back in the bowl. As it falls back into the bowl it holds on for dear life to the bacteria that had reached out from the double dipper’s mouth. “Please pull us up too”, says the salsa as it careens back into the bow. “We can’t do it says,” the bacteria. And then the salsa says, “if we are going down you are coming down with us”. And they do in fact bring some with them. Thus polluting the salsa with the bacteria from double dipper.

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How Worrisome Is This?

Well, it’s worrisome like shaking hands with a person that sneezed or coughed on their hand. Some calculated risks are taken when living in society and you are going to run into bacteria. By all means don’t skip the party in fear. In the same token if you see a person over at the salsa double dipping – don’t run towards them to get slopping seconds. You don’t know what dormant bacteria they might have.

Also, hey double dippers – when you live in polite society you also should maybe try to protect your fellow humans by not double dipping. If you must dip more put some on a plate and dip that way. After all I want you to have a good time. Just stay away from my salsa. You wouldn’t like me when I don’t have salsa.

For a great deal more information on this study and what it means please head over to the article titled Is Double Dipping A Food Safety Problem or Just a Nasty Habit?

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Last Updated on December 2, 2021

The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

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The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

Camping can be hard work, but it’s the preparation that’s even harder. There are usually a lot of things to do in order to make sure that you and your family or friends have the perfect camping experience. But sometimes you might get to your destination and discover that you have left out one or more crucial things.

There is no dispute that preparation and organization for a camping trip can be quite overwhelming, but if it is done right, you would see at the end of the day, that it was worth the stress. This is why it is important to ensure optimum planning and execution. For this to be possible, it is advised that in addition to a to-do-list, you should have a camping checklist to remind you of every important detail.

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Why You Should Have a Camping Checklist

Creating a camping checklist makes for a happy and always ready camper. It also prevents mishaps.  A proper camping checklist should include every essential thing you would need for your camping activities, organized into various categories such as shelter, clothing, kitchen, food, personal items, first aid kit, informational items, etc. These categories should be organized by importance. However, it is important that you should not list more than you can handle or more than is necessary for your outdoor adventure.

Camping checklists vary depending on the kind of camping and outdoor activities involved. You should not go on the internet and compile a list of just any camping checklist. Of course, you can research camping checklists, but you have to put into consideration the kind of camping you are doing. It could be backpacking, camping with kids, canoe camping, social camping, etc. You have to be specific and take note of those things that are specifically important to your trip, and those things which are generally needed in all camping trips no matter the kind of camping being embarked on.

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Here are some tips to help you prepare for your next camping trip.

  1. First off, you must have found the perfect campground that best suits your outdoor adventure. If you haven’t, then you should. Sites like Reserve America can help you find and reserve a campsite.
  2. Find or create a good camping checklist that would best suit your kind of camping adventure.
  3. Make sure the whole family is involved in making out the camping check list or downloading a proper checklist that reflects the families need and ticking off the boxes of already accomplished tasks.
  4. You should make out or download a proper checklist months ahead of your trip to make room for adjustments and to avoid too much excitement and the addition of unnecessary things.
  5. Checkout Camping Hacks that would make for a more fun camping experience and prepare you for different situations.

Now on to the checklist!

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Here is how your checklist should look

1. CAMPSITE GEAR

  • Tent, poles, stakes
  • Tent footprint (ground cover for under your tent)
  • Extra tarp or canopy
  • Sleeping bag for each camper
  • Sleeping pad for each camper
  • Repair kit for pads, mattress, tent, tarp
  • Pillows
  • Extra blankets
  • Chairs
  • Headlamps or flashlights ( with extra batteries)
  • Lantern
  • Lantern fuel or batteries

2.  KITCHEN

  • Stove
  • Fuel for stove
  • Matches or lighter
  • Pot
  • French press or portable coffee maker
  • Corkscrew
  • Roasting sticks for marshmallows, hot dogs
  • Food-storage containers
  • Trash bags
  • Cooler
  • Ice
  • Water bottles
  • Plates, bowls, forks, spoons, knives
  • Cups, mugs
  • Paring knife, spatula, cooking spoon
  • Cutting board
  • Foil
  • soap
  • Sponge, dishcloth, dishtowel
  • Paper towels
  • Extra bin for washing dishes

3. CLOTHES

  • Clothes for daytime
  • Sleepwear
  • Swimsuits
  • Rainwear
  • Shoes: hiking/walking shoes, easy-on shoes, water shoes
  • Extra layers for warmth
  • Gloves
  • Hats

4. PERSONAL ITEMS

  • Sunscreen
  • Insect repellent
  • First-aid kit
  • Prescription medications
  • Toothbrush, toiletries
  • Soap

5. OTHER ITEMS

  • Camera
  • Campsite reservation confirmation, phone number
  • Maps, area information

This list is not completely exhaustive. To make things easier, you can check specialized camping sites like RealSimpleRainyAdventures, and LoveTheOutdoors that have downloadable camping checklists that you can download on your phone or gadget and check as you go.

Featured photo credit: Scott Goodwill via unsplash.com

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