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Science Suggests You Should Not Shower Every Day Anymore

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Science Suggests You Should Not Shower Every Day Anymore

When people say they don’t shower every day, we usually find that weird. However, is showering every day necessary? It turns out that showering on a daily basis isn’t the healthy habit we thought it was. Keep reading this article to find out why showering less is good for you.

Do we need to shower every day?

Dr. Casey Carlos, assistant professor of medicine in the division of dermatology at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggests that showering too much isn’t good for you. Carlos explains that it’s quite difficult to get people to use soap only when they need to do so.

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Skin care science is simple; soaps remove oils from the skin. In turn, your skin becomes dry and gets a rough texture. Carlos also suggests people should use soap only in particular places such as the groin, armpits, and feet. Furthermore, you should skip using soap on chest, back, legs, and arms. Why? It’s because our skin has the amazing ability to clean itself.

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Scientific explanation

Most health and lifestyle outlets today don’t rely too much on scientific explanations that support their claims. Luckily, below you can see why frequent showers aren’t such a great habit:

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  • The top layer of your skin is composed of dead skin cells that protect underlying skin layers
  • The top layer is held together by fats or lipids that are responsible for moisture
  • Whenever you shower and scrub, you’re breaking this layer apart
  • The more showers you take, the more damage occurs in top layer
  • Due to frequent showers, your skin has less time to repair and recover through natural oil production
  • It prevents “good” bacteria from growing on your skin. This good bacteria is beneficial for protecting your skin and your body from infections
  • It’s bad for your hair too. Negative consequences include dry, dull hair that is prone to dandruff. In some cases, hair can become greasy as scalp tries to overcompensate for dryness

Supplementary benefits

  • You’ll save time
  • You’ll use less hot water
  • You’ll save money on shower gels, lotions, etc.

How to look great even when you don’t shower every day

We are used to the idea of showering every day, and we sometimes don’t even notice it’s not good for us. However, it’s possible not to shower on the daily basis and still look amazing. Below, you can see some style and beauty tips that you’ll find beneficial:

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  • Remove makeup before bedtime – this will prevent clogged pores, and you’ll wake up feeling fresh
  • Put on a new pair of underwear each morning
  • Take a wet washcloth and wipe groin region, armpits, etc.
  • Use skin brightening creams to restore healthy glow
  • Use a deodorant that doesn’t leave white streaks. Also, go for the product that doesn’t have a distinctive smell.
  • Wear clothes made of natural fabrics, particularly during summer. Polyester and sweat are never a great combination, even when you do shower every day.
  • Shave armpits regularly
  • Use dry shampoo – if you don’t have a dry shampoo, you can use baby powder. This way, your hair will look clean and smooth and smell great
  • Style your hair
  • Don’t overdo it with moisturizer
  • Use apple cider vinegar to naturally deodorize your armpits
  • Use panty liners.

Conclusion

Showering on a daily basis strips away the moisture from our skin. In turn, our skin becomes dry, rough and is more prone to irritations and redness. Excessive showering is comparable to excessive exfoliating. Both practices have the same effect. Your skin can clean itself, and there are many things you can do to appear like you just got out of the shower.

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More by this author

Evlin Symon

Evlin Symon is a health and wellness expert specialized in fitness, weight loss, pregnancy, nutrition and beauty.

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Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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