Advertising
Advertising

7 Things You Should Stop Saying To Millennials

7 Things You Should Stop Saying To Millennials

Millennials seem to be a vastly misunderstood lot. People have misconceptions about millennials, making general assumptions about their personalities, what they value, how they do things, what they believe in, so on and so forth. In recent years, more formal research and studies have been conducted that give us a better insight about this group of young people. In the multi-generational workplace today, more and more people issues arise when people fall prey to misconceptions and say the wrongs things or in the wrong way to others, especially millennials. Considering more than 50% of the workforce will be comprised of millennials by the year 2020, it’s time we learned the right way to communicate with them!

Here are seven things you should stop saying to millennials:

1. You do XYZ because I told you to do so!

Top down approach is not popular with millennials. Giving them instructions and directions and only as-needed information is the surest way to lose their trust and interest. They thrive on feeling a sense of connection and owning the task. Giving them orders and not truly making them a part of the team does not foster the connection they seek with their work.

Instead, include them in all relevant conversations and be transparent. This makes them feel respected and valued and hence foster’s their output and commitment to the workplace.

Advertising

2. You have to rely on IT to give you the latest and the greatest.

This group of people is very familiar and comfortable with technology. They know the latest productivity apps, the newest chat channels, and the greatest softwares. Telling them to wait for a long time to get a piece of technology approved by the IT department, is a big source of frustration and hindrance to the way they work. A couple of years ago (when I was still technically in the millennial age bracket), I was at a meeting with a top C level executive and typing away my notes on Evernote. The C level executive asked me what it is and after I explained, he asked me if it had been approved by IT. He was concerned that I could access my notes on my phone or my home computer. He recommended that I talk to the head of IT about it. Luckily for me, I was not mandated to stop using Evernote. Evernote is like a right arm to me and it would be extremely difficult to manage my notes and work on word documents and emails!

In the same vein, millennials expect the latest and greatest with their devices, connectivity, and applications. Easy to use software and devices with minimal IT interference is a great perk for millennials.

3.You have to wait to talk about it in the Annual Performance Review.

Shelving important conversations such as giving feedback, explanations, strategic discussions etc are things that supervisors tend to put off for later. Near term tasks/needs and putting off the ‘immediate fire situation’ are most often the priorities on a day-to-day basis. Millennials want to be a part of the strategic discussions, want their opinions to be heard and want immediate feedback, if possible on the spot.

When millennials approach you, be transparent, open and inviting, give feedback as often as possible and satiate their hunger to grow and be a part of the organization.

Advertising

4. You must get this task done.

Giving a millennial a task and asking them to get it done without any other explanation will raise eyebrows for sure! Millennials like to understand not just what the task is but also why it is done, how it fits into the overall vision for the company, and how it upholds the mission of the organization. They see it all as an interconnected web and how their contribution plays a big part in upholding this web.

Make sure to give millennials the entire 3D, 4D, and any other D view of the project to help them buy in and garner their support for completion of the task.

5. You are on a one-man team:

As much as millennials love their time with their devices, this generation thrives on human connections. Setting up a one-person team will demoralize millennials. It is not that they are not capable of finishing tasks on their own, but more so that they like to collaborate.

Provide opportunities to collaborate and do team work.

Advertising

6. You move to this role and your career path is:

Millennials thrive on autonomy and by taking charge of their career destiny. Don’t allot them to roles and paths that you think is best for them.

Engage in conversations with them and let them make decisions concerning their career paths.

7. You ask for things that are against our policy :

Flexible work arrangements are important to millennials. Being able to work from home or choose flexible work timings allows them to take care of other commitments. Honoring their commitments is a big deal for this group. Blaming it on policy if you have not given it a try before, is a strict no-no.

Instead, being willing to try new suggestions as suggested by millennials, giving their ideas a fair chance earns their respect and trust and commitment.

Advertising

This warm, engaging and collaborative group is brimming with potential. Let us use the right communication tools to maximize our interactions with millennials.

Featured photo credit: depositphotos/scornejor via depositphotos.com

More by this author

Career Strategies I Wish I Knew Earlier In My 20s 8 Ways To Think Different And Develop Your Own Opinion 7 Things You Should Stop Saying To Millennials Why Grateful People Live Longer And Lead A Happier Life youtube This Is How Successful YouTubers Run Their Channels

Trending in Communication

1 How to Live up to Your Full Potential and Succeed in Life 2 7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience 3 The Real Causes of Lack of Energy That Go Beyond Your Physical Health 4 If You Think You’re in an Unhappy Marriage, Remember These 5 Things 5 10 Ways to Find Learning Motivation Even If You’ve Graduated Long Ago

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

Advertising

It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

Advertising

3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

Advertising

Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

Advertising

6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

Read Next