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What you need to know about the recent red meat/cancer report

What you need to know about the recent red meat/cancer report

This issue doesn’t seem to be going away at all. A few weeks ago the World Health Organization tried to pull a Kim Kardashian and break the internet with its report on the connection between red meat and cancer.

They released a report linking red meat and processed meat with cancer and media outlets, websites, blogs and new stations jumped all over this info calling out red meat for essentially being the devil.

As it tends to happen with reports like this, a lot of the information was shared incorrectly and conclusions were jumped to. Here’s what you need to know about the insights into the red meat/cancer issue.

Weaker Observational Studies Were Used

If you follow science and research you know that these types of studies are some of the least effective in finding real results. In this case, it was the International Agency for Research on Cancer that was taking information from 800 different studies and trying to connect some dots. And the way they gathered their information regarding the red meat issue? Was it through clinical studies, hospital reports and medical examinations? Nope, it was done by food questionnaires.

The goal of the IARC was to identify the possible agents that can cause cancer and have so far come up with a list of 900. Out of those 900 agents, only 1 has not been linked to cancer. They broke down these agents into different categories using vague terms like “may” cause cancer or “possibly” could cause cancer.

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Also on this huge list of possibly causing cancer? Coffee and wine.

These studies are not looking at a direct causation between a certain item like a hot dog and cancer but just that these agents contain one or more compounds that COULD cause cancer. This is an important distinction as correlation and causation are two entirely different things.

Ice Cream & Murder

An example of how correlation or association can give you some skewed results is the findings that increased sales in ice cream lead to a higher murder rate. I’m not saying some Rocky Road will turn you into Charles Manson but when you look at when ice cream sales rise it tends to be when it gets warmer in the summer months. When the heat goes up it also creates irritability and aggression in people that can lead to more violent crimes including murder. So when you look at many variables that are all grouped together the connection can be made between higher ice cream sales and murder rates.

Here’s another one; Margarine sales lead to divorce.

Red Meat, Cigarettes and Asbestos

Since processed meats like bologna, hot dogs and beef jerky contain one or more compounds that could lead to cancer they get placed into the same category as noted cancer causers like cigarettes and asbestos. Again, not a fair connection. They can fall under the same umbrella but have vastly different percentages in danger.

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A good example used to illustrate this is bananas and cars. A banana is harmless, but the discarded skin has the possibility to make you slip and hurt yourself. There is no chance of this happening as high as there to be in a car crash, but they can both cause accidents so need to be put in the same accident causing category. And obviously the results of a car crash are much more severe. So look at the processed meat as the banana peel and things like cigarettes and asbestos as the car crash.

Cigarettes increase your relative risk of lung cancer by 2500% and the stat thrown around about processed meat and colorectal cancer says eating 2 slices of bacon a day can increase your relative risk for it by 18%. But when you look at the lower frequency of colorectal cancer the risk of actually getting it drops to 5-6%.

Alfred Neuget, who is an oncologist and cancer epidemiologist from Columbia says, “If this is the level of risk you’re running your life on, then you really don’t have much to worry about.”

Ignoring Other Lifestyle Factors

To me, this is where it gets ridiculous. These reports pluck one single thing out, in this case, processed meat, and blames it for disease. They fail to recognize one or many other factors that have disease-causing potential. They fail to recognize things like:

  • Lack of physical activity
  • Smoking
  • High Body Mass Index
  • Overconsumption of sugar
  • Alcohol intake
  • Consumption of fried foods

You don’t need to be an expert to see that this list above has the potential to cause a lot of problems and these factors are not taken into consideration as red meat is singled out.

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Combining Unprocessed Meat & Processed Meat

Again another misleading result as the difference between a Slim Jim and grass fed beef is night and day. Somehow out of all this hoopla came the idea that unprocessed fresh meat was under attack while the report was looking at processed meats.

When you look at the last 3 decades of research and findings fresh meat has actually very little to do with cancer. The associations between colorectal cancer and red meat are so weak they are considered “statistically insignificant”.

The most recent updates to this issue only show the continued weak association and the role of red meat causing colorectal cancer have been increasingly contested by the scientific community.

What You Can Take Away From All This

The main point for men out there and your families is that you don’t need red meat to be healthy. But if you do consume it, don’t worry about recent reports from the W.H.O and the media hoopla scare you away from it.

It’s probably safe to stay away from things like hot dogs and beef jerky, but we already knew that. One last thing is any studies conducted on fresh meat rarely use grass fed and finished hormone free, organic beef. This beef is the polar opposite of factory raised, farm lot grocery store beef that generally is used. Also not factored in are the cooking methods like high heat and smoking that can be responsible for creating carcinogens that are not found in the meat.

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Similar to the rest of your diet, try to find the cleanest sources of food possible, and when you see reports and findings on any nutrition information, dig deeper and keep educating yourself on the entire issue.

And you don’t need to listen to the media, no matter how much Kim Kardashian tries to make you listen..

Featured photo credit: Ronald Sarayudej via flickr.com

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Jamie Logie

Jamie is a personal trainer and health coach with a degree in Kinesiology and Food and Nutrition.

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Last Updated on September 18, 2020

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

1. Exercise Daily

It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

3. Acknowledge Your Limits

Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

The basic nutritional advice includes:

  • Eat unprocessed foods
  • Eat more veggies
  • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
  • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

    5. Watch Out for Travel

    Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

    This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

    If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

    6. Start Slow

    Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

    If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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    7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

    Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

    My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

    If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

    I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

    Final Thoughts

    Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

    Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

    More Tips on Getting in Shape

    Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

    Reference

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