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5 Types of Interviews that You Should Look Out For

5 Types of Interviews that You Should Look Out For

When searching for a job, one of the most rigorous and closely-analyzed part of the process is the interview. A whole industry—interview coaches, resume writers, personal growth coaches, and so forth—bases its livelihood on the potential interviewee (you), lacking confidence regarding your interview. Job aspirants need to know that the interview is as much a learning process for the company as it is for you.

In many cases, the interviewer has no idea what they are doing, and I’ve compiled just a short list of my experiences in which the interviewer may have been more nervous that the interviewee.

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1. My Party Interview at a World-Renowned University:

I once interviewed for an administrative position at a world-renowned university here in the Chicagoland area. The position was in the university’s grants department, and the aim was to compile huge amounts of data so that the university could continue to properly apply for funding for scientific research.

When I walked into the interview door, there were eight women, mostly aged 25-35, seated around a large conference table, chatting about whatever. They went around in order, asking the most basic questions of me, and only two of the eight seemed to even be able to hear what I had to say. One pair kept chatting over me the whole time. Safe to say, I walked out there wondering how they thought they were going to get a qualified candidate, and how such a prestigious institution could think that was an interview.

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2. The Generic Under-Interview:

In many positions I’ve fulfilled, I went into the interview needing a job, and was more or less immediately handed one. In a situation in which you need some source of income, this is great: maximum reward for minimum effort. However, when the person does so little to analyze how you might fulfill the position, that itself should raise flags. Not analyzing your ability to do the work at interview stage means the interviewer will likely under- or over-estimate the needs of a task later on, and you will often be left confused, overburdened, or both. If you need to take a position like this, after you are hired, be prepared to ask a ton of questions, because the supervisor will almost never give you what you need.

3. The Cultish Interview:

On one or maybe two occasions, I went into a company thinking I was getting interviewed and basically came out thinking the company either was trying to get me to buy their product or maybe even trying to brainwash me. The most recent occasion was for a company that sold sales self-improvement advice called Glazer-Kennedy Insider’s Circle. (I feel comfortable mentioning their name because of their lower Better Business Bureau rating.) While that certainly can be a serious business sector, the panel of rotating interviewers at GKIC kept repeating the name “Dan Kennedy” over and over. The first interviewer said it just a few times, the second interviewer repeated it consistently, and when the third interviewer came in and asked me, before sitting down, “What do [you] know about Dan Kennedy?” I wished I had stayed home. Whether it was a Ponzi scheme or an actual cult, I never bothered to find out.

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4. The Therapy Session:

I cannot recall an instance in which this happened to me specifically, but several colleagues have recalled interviews in which the questions were intensely personal. For example, when I worked under the worst boss I ever had, coworkers and I would regularly commiserate, and one of them shared that my boss confided a past history of paternal abuse during my coworker’s interview. While my coworker took the position because she would not have to directly report to this tortured supervisor, I wish I had a glimpse of that before I took the position, because my tenure ended when I went to the Equal Employment Opportunity commission to see if several encounters qualified as sexual harassment. Sometimes, the interviewer is incredibly unstable, and, given the chance, they will show you that side.

5. The Casual Chat:

If ever an interview feels like you are chatting with a friend and not a potential employer, you can go ahead and assume you aren’t really even being considered. Signs of this include: talking about the requirements of the job more than your qualifications, conversing about a shared history, or even talking about the weather or news too much. Much like this entry, the casual chat interview will leave you pleasant and happy, but totally uninformed, lacking in a sense of accomplishment, and unconcerned about following up.

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Featured photo credit: WOCinTech Chat/Jimbo Fisher via flickr.com

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Last Updated on September 23, 2020

Do What You Love and Love What You Do to Achieve More

Do What You Love and Love What You Do to Achieve More

Are you waking up each day looking for that perfect thing, activity, or job that will make your life work? Or, maybe you are looking for that perfect relationship. Once you “get” this new thing that will allow you to do what you love, you are sure that you will be happy forever.

In reality, life doesn’t work like that, and we would probably get bored if it did. There is likely no one thing, experience, or activity that will keep you feeling passionate and engaged all the time. What’s important is staying connected to what you love and continuing to grow in the process.

Here, we’ll talk about how to get started doing what you love and achieving more in life through the motivation it brings. Doing this doesn’t have to take a long time; it just takes determination and energy.

Most People Already Know Their Passion

So many people walk around in life “looking for” their passion. They look for it as if true passion is some mysterious thing that is difficult to find and runs away once you find it. However, the problem is rarely lack of passion.

Most of us already know what we love to do. We know what excites us, even if we haven’t done it for years. Instead, we focus on what we think we “must” do.

For example, maybe you love building model cars or painting pet portraits. Yet, each day you work a completely unrelated job and make no time for the activity you already know you love. The truth is you probably don’t need to find your passion; you just need to start doing what you already know you’re passionate about[1].

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No Activity Is Exciting All the Time

Even people who are living their dream lifestyle or working their dream job don’t love it all the time. Every job or lifestyle has parts of it that we won’t like.

Let’s say your dream is to become an actress, and you succeed. You may not enjoy the process of auditioning and facing rejection. You may experience moments of boredom when you practice your lines over and over again. But the overall experience is totally worth it.

Most of life is like that. Don’t set yourself up for disappointment by demanding that life be perfect all the time. If things were perfect and easy, you would ultimately stop learning and growing, and life would begin to lack even more meaning in that case.

Be grateful for both the good and bad moments as they are both entirely necessary if you genuinely want to do what you love and love what you do.

Doing What You Love May Not Be Easy

Living a life you love is unlikely to be easy. If it was, you would not grow very much as a person. And, if you think about a great book or movie, the growth of the main character is what matters most.

What if the challenges you meet along your path to living a life you love were designed to make you grow as a person? You may actually start looking forward to challenges instead of dreading them. An easy life hardly ever makes a compelling story.

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If you struggle to overcome challenges, try writing them down each time you encounter one. Then, write down three ways you could tackle it. Try one, and if it doesn’t work, try another. This way, you’ll learn what does and doesn’t work for you.

How to Do What You Love

There are many small steps you can take to ensure you are making time to do the things you love. Start with these, and you’ll likely find that you’re already on the right track.

1. Choose Your Priorities Wisely

Many people claim they want to do something, yet they don’t do it. The truth is they might not really want to do it in the first place[2].

We all end up following through on what matters most to us. We make decisions moment by moment about what we need to focus on. What we choose to do is what we deem most important in our lives.

If there is something you claim you want to do but you don’t do it, try asking yourself how much you really want it or where it’s currently placed on priority list. Are there other things you want more?

Be honest with yourself: what you currently do each day is a reflection of your priorities. Recognize that you can change your priorities at any time.

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Make a list of your priorities. Really take the time to think this through. Then, ask yourself if what you are doing each day reflects them. For example, if you believe your top priority is spending more time with your family, but you consistently take on extra hours at work, you’re not really prioritizing things in the way you think you are.

If this is happening, it’s time to make a change.

2. Do One Small Thing Each Day

As stated above, doing what you love doesn’t have to mean finding that perfect job that makes you want to jump out of bed in the morning. If you want to do what you love, start with one small thing each day.

Maybe you love reading a good book. Take ten minutes before bed to read.

Maybe you love swimming. Get a membership at the local YMCA, and go there for thirty minutes after work each day.

Dedicating even a short amount of time to something that brings you joy each day will improve your life overall. You may find that, over time, a career path related to what you love to do pops up. After doing the thing you love each day, you’ll be more than prepared to take it on when the opportunity arises.

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If you need help making time for your passions, check out this article to get started.

3. Prepare to Make Sacrifices

If you are an exceptionally busy person (aren’t we all?), you may have to make sacrifices in order to make space for the things you are passionate about. Maybe you take on less extra hours at the office or take thirty minutes away from another hobby in order to develop another that you enjoy.

Looking at your priority list will help you decide what can get put on the back burner and what can’t. Remember, do this thinking about what will help you feel good about how you’re spending your time. 

For example, if you love writing but rarely make time for it, consider getting up 30 minutes earlier than normal. Or instead of browsing your phone for 30 minutes before bed, you can write instead. There is always a way to find time for what you love.

Final Thoughts

If you love what you do, each day becomes a joyful adventure. If you don’t love what you are doing, life feels like a chore. The best way to achieve success is to design a life you love and live it every day.

Remember, doing something you love doesn’t have to include big gestures or time-consuming projects. Start small and grow from there.

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Featured photo credit: William Recinos via unsplash.com

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