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Keeping Millennials Motivated in a Remote Workplace

Keeping Millennials Motivated in a Remote Workplace

These days, more and more companies are opting to move to a remote workplace where employees are free to skip the commute and work from the comfort of their own homes. Since Millennials make up the majority of the American workforce, it’s important to understand how to successfully manage this group from a distance. Does motivating a generation that is constantly described as lazy and entitled sound tough? Here are some tips to make it easier:

Collaboration Generation

The Millennial generation craves working in a collaborative environment, which can be challenging when employees are remote. Luckily, there are ways that managers can get around this location barrier. Remote companies should rely heavily on video chats to make Millennials feel as if they are still logging meaningful, productive time with other employees. If your remote employees work in the same general area, try to set aside an afternoon to meet in person for a team-building activity or brainstorming session. This personal contact will invigorate Millennial employees and keep job satisfaction high.

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Way to Go, Millennial

Sometimes referred to as the “participation trophy generation”, this group of employees thrives off of rewards and recognition from their superiors. It may be difficult for management to remember to acknowledge a job well done when an employee isn’t right down the hallway, but it’s important nonetheless. Did someone meet a tight deadline? Take on extra work when a peer was out sick? No matter the size of the accomplishment, be sure to acknowledge the effort. Anything from a quick email to say thanks or a shout-out on the next conference call will light a fire under your Millennial employees.

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In Millennials We Trust

A pet peeve of this generation is the feeling of being micromanaged. If a company is just switching to remote work, it may be hard for a manager to let go of the control of knowing that every employee is where they should be. However, Millennials will not respond well when treated as if they are not trusted. So, how is a manager supposed to walk this fine line? Set up structure. Give Millennials long-term goals to work towards; then, arrange a weekly or bi-monthly check-in to go over progress made. Fight the urge to spot-check what a Millennial is doing during the work week and the foundation for a positive, productive relationship will be in place.

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Allow Flexibility

A recent study showed that 45% of Millennials in the workplace are more concerned with job flexibility than pay. Millennials don’t see the value in the standard 9-5 structure of corporate America, and work well when given the opportunity to adjust these hours. Provide these flexible working hours to remote employees as long as it doesn’t impact the business or aggravate customers. Showing Millennial employees that you understand a work/life balance is needed will keep them engaged and motivated.

Provide Room for Growth

Millennials are infamous for not being afraid to job-hop, typically staying at a company for less than three years. In a remote work environment, it is even more of a priority to keep Millennials personally and professionally invested with the company. Talk to remote employees about their future careers and desired positions within the company. Research local events put on by organizations like the American Marketing Association or Chamber of Commerce and encourage employees to attend to learn new professional skills. Millennials appreciate companies that have an impact on the world outside of the product or service being offered. Encourage these employees to take time off to support events or causes that work to better the community. Personal growth is just as important to Millennials as professional growth, so a company that offers both will be sure to keep Millennials around, even from afar.

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Last Updated on September 24, 2020

11 Things You Should Minimize for a Better Life

11 Things You Should Minimize for a Better Life

Ever heard the statement less is more? Is that a reality in your life or is that an area you are struggling with? Below are 11 different areas you can look at in your life to start to reduce as you focus on building a better life.

Let’s get to it:

Your Stuff

I call it stuff vs possessions. Stuff is what adds clutter in your life. It could be shoes, curios from the cute store in your town or excess appliances you need to throw out but never do. What is it that is overtaking your house that if you moved away you wouldn’t need it at all? Plan a Sunday afternoon throw out session. If throwing out doesn’t sit right then give it away to goodwill.

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Your Acquaintances

How many people are you interacting with throughout the week that don’t leave you feeling good about yourself? Who inspires you? Spend time with those people. Too often we keep people in our lives that we are no longer a fit for. Having too many old acquaintances adds to the excess in your life. If the relationship isn’t a win-win for you both then take a step back and focus on those that do.

Your Goals

Motivated to write out your list of goal for the next month or 3 months? That is awesome. Just a few works of caution. Don’t write down too many. Often people write down over ten goals. The brain can only remember so much and the reality is you won’t get to them all. I suggest you look at your goals with the mindset of single digits. No more than ten, but ideally less than five. Keep the list focused and realistic.

Your Commitments

A new favorite buzz saying in the self-help world is “No is the new Yes”. Take a moment to think about that saying. If you started saying no more how would your week and life look? Would you have more time to commit to the important goals and people in your life? Start to practice saying No when a request comes your way that you don’t want to do. If that feels too harsh try responding with these words “Let me get back to you”. Go away and come back with a no when you are in stronger mindset to say that.

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Your Multitasking

I am giving you permission to stop multitasking. We used to be told that multitasking was a good practice. We look so busy and aren’t we getting a lot done? In fact, no. Multitasking isn’t possible with the way our brain is wired. We need to focus on one key thing and keep our attention on that item until it is complete.

Your Newsfeed

I consider all the information from the Internet that is being feed into our smartphone, laptop and brain as “the newsfeed.” It doesn’t add to having more knowledge, it adds to information overload. Build time in your day or week when you are completely offline. I recommend turning your wireless off or setting your smart phone to airplane mode.

Your Cards

Open up your wallet and take a look inside. What is in it? For most of us it is more than one store, charge or loyalty card. Too many cards add to extra spending, bills and lack of clarity of where our money goes. Look at what cards you truly need and use. Get rid of the rest (scissors work!).

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Your Mail

Both the old style (postal) and your email inbox are areas to minimize. Look at ways to get off catalogs or reduce the magazine subscriptions as you never read all of them anyway. Figure out what mail, e.g. bank statements, can be changed to digital mail only. Try the same with your inbox. Sites like unroll.me can tell you how many email newsletters you are subscribed to and you can take your name off the list that you know longer need.

Your Sitting Time

Too much time in front of the screen is not good for the posture and health of your body. Try setting a timer so every 50 minutes you get up and stretch or go for a five minute walk. We don’t realize how bad our posture is when we sit for long periods of time. The studies on sitting disease are what led to standing and walking desks to be invented. If your office doesn’t have that get into a regular habit to stand and walk often in your day.

Too much time by yourself can led the mind to wander. When the mind wanders it will often return with negative thoughts and beliefs. While a walk by yourself and some downtime is rejuvenating take notice if you start to feel un- inspired or a little sad and make sure you aren’t spending too much time in your own company. This is especially important for those of us who work from home. Make sure to have people interaction throughout your day.

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Your Lack of Belief

If you want to make a change or achieve a goal in your life you need to truly, 100 percent believe you can. If you don’t believe in yourself then why should anyone else?

The difference between a successful person and someone struggling can be as simple as a mindset switch to believe that they will succeed.

What areas can you minimize to create more happiness, focus and productivity in your life? Implement just a handful from the list and you will find that the mindset of ‘Less is More’ will be what leads you on the path to a better life!

Featured photo credit: Samantha Gades via unsplash.com

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