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When Do You Start Showing In Pregnancy? Here’re The Month-by-Month Pregnant Belly Pictures

When Do You Start Showing In Pregnancy? Here’re The Month-by-Month Pregnant Belly Pictures

Month One

month one pregnant belly front and side

    Congratulations you are pregnant! However, chances are you might not even know it yet. The first two weeks consist of ovulation, which means there is no baby yet. It isn’t until the third week where conception takes place. Hello sperm, meet egg. Once fertilized, the egg will then divide and divide into what will appear as a ball of cells called a blastocyst. The blastocyst begins its journey from your fallopian tubes down to your uterus, it’s new home for the next nine months. By the end of month one, the blastocyst will begin implanting itself to the uterine lining and become an embryo. Your little ball of cells will then divide into two parts – one half being your future baby boy or girl and the other half will become the placenta – your baby’s lifeline during its time in the uterus.

    Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

    Your baby is no bigger than the size of a poppyseed, about 2 mm long. Your belly won’t have visibly changed, showing no signs of a baby…yet.

    Month Two

    month two pregnant belly front and side view

      If you didn’t know you were pregnant last month, then you’ll definitely know it this month. The telltale symptoms of pregnancy are starting to creep up: nausea, fatigue, constant peeing and food aversions and cravings. The first circulatory system to develop in your baby is the heart and this month it takes shape. Some other big contenders in the making are: kidneys, liver and lungs. Your baby is also starting to grow some human like features complete with little arms and legs.

      Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

      Your baby has graduated from the size of a poppyseed to the size of a raspberry, about 1/2 an inch. To you, you might start to see and feel a little difference in your mid section. It might feel slightly firmer than usual, however outsiders are still unable to notice anything going on.

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      Month Three

      month three pregnant belly

        This marks the end of your first trimester and pregnancy symptoms are most likely still going strong. Every woman and pregnancy is different so whatever symptoms you may be feeling may not be the same as others or even your previous pregnancies. Along with the ending of the first trimester comes the next stage in your baby’s development from embryo to fetus. Those little arms and legs will begin to make movements however it’ll be at least another month before you actually feel them. Don’t be too disappointed because during this month you should be able to finally hear your baby’s heartbeat on a Doppler device. Also equally exciting is your baby is developing its sex organs and is soon going to be a he or a she. Again, it’s too early to find out the sex though.

        Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

        Your baby has more than doubled in size and by the end of month three should be about 2.5-3 inches long, the size of a peach. Making room for that baby in the uterus your waist may start to thicken. You may notice your pants starting to feel a bit more snug and, even though it may be slight, a tiny bump starting to form at the bottom.

        Month Four

        month four pregnant belly

          The beginning of the second trimester also welcomes a nice break from all the horrible pregnancy feels you may have been experiencing in the first trimester. If you’re lucky you might start feeling less queasy, have more energy and feeling a little more like yourself again….only pregnant. This is also when fetuses start to grow at different rates, an early sign of their very individual traits. Your baby is starting to grow some hair! For some, possibly on its head but also some body hair will be sprouting called lanugo. Lanugo is like a downy fur coating which helps keep your baby warm. Your baby is also moving alot more now, being able to wiggle its little fingers and toes but also he or she can breathe, suck and swallow now too. Baby’s muscles are getting stronger and you might even feel a few kicks during this month too.

          Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

          Your baby is about the size of your palm now measuring in at approximately 5 inches long by the end of the month. Your belly continues to grow and become more pronounced. This is usually around the time where some women decide to start spreading the news as it starts to become harder to hide the belly. If this is not the case you might be wondering “When do you start showing in pregnancy?”. Remember every woman and every baby is different, for some the belly starts showing early but others it might not start popping out into a little later down the road.

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          Month Five
          five months pregnant belly

            As you probably already know (and feel) baby is growing and developing at a rapid speed. He is also learning a whole bunch of new skills such as yawning and hiccuping (which you might even be able to feel as well). Your baby is also coming into his own because he now has his own set of unique finger and toe prints. Also your baby’s sense are starting to develop, and just in time because the amniotic fluid is changing day to day depending on what you eat. Start them early with healthy food habits.

            Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

            The baby is about 7 inches long now and approximately the size of a large banana. He’s also weighing in over a whole entire 1 lb now! This is the month where you start to show much more noticeably. You might even find that strangers are starting to comment on your pregnant status. Bellies vary, some sit very low, some high and some right in the middle. An old wives’ tale states that the way your belly sits is directly linked to the sex of your child, but that is nothing but an old wives’ tale.

            Month Six

            month six pregnant belly

              Up until this point your baby has been mostly skinny for the most part, but that’s about to change because fat will start to develop this month. The all important lungs are almost fully developed and along with it the ability to breathe. Baby’s nostrils will begin to open up and he can now practice breathing and hiccuping as well (you’ll feel and maybe even see lots of those). Your baby will start looking a lot more like he will when he’s born as his face is almost fully formed and his eyes begin to open. With heightened senses come more awareness of a world outside of the womb. If you shine a bright light at your belly or even make a loud noise, you might startle your baby!

              Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

              This month your baby will have almost doubled its length and weight since last month coming in at approximately 15 inches long and around 2 lbs. This is apparent in your belly as it rounds out more and becomes more pronounced. Your uterus is about the size of a basketball now and folks might even accuse you of smuggling one under your shirt.

              Month Seven

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              month seven pregnant belly

                Welcome to the third and final trimester. Your little one is mastering some skills in the womb such as blinking, coughing and even dreaming because REM (rapid eye movement) sleep is starting. Matching your baby’s new repertoire of skills comes the massive development of his brain. Things are getting cramped in there so you’ll be feeling your baby move more and more.

                Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

                Your baby’s growth is starting to slow down as it gets closer to the delivery date. Your baby is weighing in at approximately 3 lbs and measuring 18 inches long. Remember this varies from baby to baby especially now because your baby is getting closer to his actual length and weight at time of birth.

                Month Eight

                eight months pregnant belly

                  Your baby is mastering the skills (swallowing, breathing, kicking and sucking) needed for when he makes his big debut. His skin is no longer see through and is opaque. Your baby is building up antibodies and developing his immune system. He is also getting into position settling into an optimal heads down and bottoms up position. This makes it much easier for mama when it comes to delivery. Some babies don’t ever get into this position though which causes problems when it comes time for birth. Although space is getting limited, baby is still very active and those cute little kicks and jabs are starting to feel more and more uncomfortable.

                  Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

                  Baby’s weight is growing steadily at an average of 1/2 lb per week while growth is starting to taper off. On average your baby may be coming in at around 20 inches long and 5 1/5 lbs. Your belly is generally the same shape as last month but it may be popping out a bit more now.

                  Month Nine

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                  nine months pregnant belly

                    So close yet so far! This will probably be the longest month as you somewhat patiently wait for the arrival of your baby. The good news is that at 37 weeks your baby is considered full term. Although this is the case, your baby hasn’t stopped growing at that point. Fat continues to accumulate, your baby practices his breathing and sucking, his systems (circulatory and musculoskeletal) are getting ready for the outside world, he’s shedding his lanugo and his skin is turning white. Yes, white because skin pigmentation doesn’t occur until shorty after birth. Also as impatient as you are so is baby as he starts getting fidgety you might notice he is starting to flip from side to side. As he starts to get into birthing position you might start to feel like it’s getting harder to breathe and even walk! Hang in there sister!

                    Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

                    Baby’s weight and size is going to vary at this point now that he’s ready to come out into the world. Full term babies can weigh anywhere from 6-10 lbs and measure approximately 19 to 22 inches. Of course there are smaller and bigger babies than that that are born perfectly healthy as well. Your belly is at its largest and curviest as it holds onto that baby tight.

                    Remember every woman is different and every pregnancy is different. Your month to month may look different than mine and my next pregnancy might even look different than this last one did too.

                    Pregnancy Resources

                    http://www.newkidscenter.com/Pregnant-Belly.html

                    What to Expect When you’re Expecting

                    Featured photo credit: Kelly Hunter via flickr.com

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                    Last Updated on August 15, 2018

                    Entitled Kids Are Parents’ Biggest Enemies

                    Entitled Kids Are Parents’ Biggest Enemies

                    An old Proverb says “Wealth gotten by vanity shall be diminished: but he that gathers by labor shall increase.” It is good advice. We probably have applied this to our own lives already. We believe that nothing good or worthwhile comes easily, so we work hard to earn what we want. Unfortunately, kids these days seem to be missing that message. They are growing up feeling and acting as though their mere existence entitles them to money, the newest smart phone, TVs, designer clothes, and more. The entitlement attitude is pervasive in our culture and it starts with what we are teaching our children.

                    If we don’t want our culture to be entitled, we need to start preventing entitlement in our own homes. That way, 20 years from now, you won’t have a 30 year old living in your guest suite using your credit card for their needs because they have no desire to go out and earn it for themselves.

                    Video Summary

                    How entitlement begins

                    None of us wants to think that we are making our children feel entitled. However, it happens easily to all of us, especially to good parents. Parents who try hard to give their children a good, happy, and full childhood easily fall into the entitlement parenting trap. It’s because of a parent’s desire to make their child happy that they give too much. Their child grows up without any wanting. Needs and desires are met by the parent and thus the child not only feels, but knows that their parent is there to provide for them.

                    Needs are essential to be met by parents, but what about all those wants? Is a phone a want or a need? What kind of clothing becomes a want instead of a need? You as a parent need to start differentiating between needs and wants in order to properly parent in a manner that works to diminish entitlement attitudes.

                    We want our children to feel happy and loved, but our efforts can be undermining them mentally. We may be feeding into the development of their entitlement attitude by doing and giving too much. Psychology Today examines children’s sense of entitlement and states,[1]

                    Yet, when children receive everything they want, we feed into their sense of entitlement—and feelings of gratitude fall by the wayside. It’s what Amy McCready, founder of Positive Parenting Solutions, believes is a “Me, Me, Me” epidemic brought on by parents doing everything they can to insure their children’s happiness.

                    Good parents who are trying very hard unfortunately are feeding into the entitlement epidemic when they give their kids too much. Wanting your children to be happy is wonderful, but there are ways to help develop their character so that the entitlement attitude does not seep into your household.

                    How to know if your child is acting entitled

                    There are some indicators with your child’s behavior that will show you whether or not they have or are developing an attitude of entitlement. These are just some examples:

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                    • They do not handle losing well.
                    • They do not congratulate winning opponents (whether it be in sports, a board game, or simply a race on the playground).
                    • They do not cope well with being told “no”.
                    • They do not make an effort to help around the household.
                    • When asked to help, they whine and complain, as though they should not be expected to help in the household.
                    • They often think the rules apply to other people and not to them.
                    • If they have a problem in school or life, they expect you as the parent to take care of the problem for them.
                    • They expect to be rewarded for good behavior with toys or treats, rather than good behavior being expected from the parents and does not require rewards. This is especially true in public places such as going to the market.
                    • They do not care about the feelings, needs, or desires of others. Act selfish and self centered in general.
                    • They do not accept responsibility for the behavior or things that have gone wrong that are their fault. Make excuses or passes the blame to others.
                    • Things are never enough for them. They always want more, bigger, or better of whatever it may be that they currently have or are doing.
                    • They do not express genuine gratitude when appropriate, such as getting a gift or a compliment. You as a parent are always having to prompt them to say “thank you”.
                    • If their friend has something, the expectation is that they should have it too.
                    • If they request a list of items for a birthday or holiday, then they expect that they will receive all of the items on their list. If they do not get all of the requested items, they will be disappointed, rather than grateful for what they did get.
                    • They always seek to be the first and are upset or greatly disappointed when they are not the first (i.e. first in line, first to get a task completed, first to finish an exercise).

                    How to prevent entitlement

                    Preventing entitlement starts with the parent. It can start today. You have the power to say “yes” and to say “no” to your child. You, as parent, are the rule maker and can help pave the way to making your kids grateful rather than entitled. Below are some tips to pave the way with your family to preventing entitlement.

                    Stop doing

                    Stop doing everything for your child. Allow them to do things that they can do for themselves. If they are able to handle a complex video game, then they are more than capable of doing the dishes, raking leaves, making their bed, and more.

                    We don’t give our kids enough credit. They are far more capable then we recognize. Kids at the age of 5 are out on street corners selling candy and goods to tourists in third world countries. They make change for buyers, interact with their buyers, and work all day to help provide income for their family. Therefore, we can certainly expect our own 5 year-olds to make their bed, unload the dishwasher, and clean up their toys.

                    Children are smart, capable, and hard working when properly motivated. If the expectation is that they can complete a task then they will be able to do it. If the expectation is that they cannot do something, then they won’t be able to do it. You, the parent, are the agent to empower them to do things by asking, providing them with directions, and then setting the expectation that they will complete the task at hand.

                    Empower your children by doing less for them. If they are capable of doing something, then let them do it!

                    Teach them to be good losers

                    Your child will not win at everything. Therefore, they need to learn the art of being a gracious loser. From a young age, they should be taught to congratulate the winner and to shake their opponent’s hand. Talk to your child about winning and losing. Let them know it is ok to lose. It is an opportunity to learn and become better. They should congratulate the winner because someday they may be the winner and it will be nice to have others providing the congratulatory messages to them.

                    The world is a better place if we can be happy for the successes of others, especially if those people are friends and family. When playing games as a family or with friends, teach them by example. Congratulate the winners whole-heartedly and make the winner feel good about their achievement, even it if is just Chutes and Ladders.

                    For the losers, you say “better luck next time” and give them a genuine smile. Teach your child that these are the ways we show kindness to others, especially when we lose. This is a harder lesson for younger children to grasp, but be consistent with your own behavior and your insistence that they act the same way when they do not win. Eventually your hard work should pay off and you will have a child who has genuinely learned to be happy for others because they know what it is like to be a winner and a loser and they cannot win at all times.

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                    Use the opportunity of failure or losing to explain to your child about some of the greats in this world that did not at first succeed. Oprah did not get her first TV job she interviewed for and Tom Hanks dropped out of college and was a bellhop before he became famous. You can also use the opportunity to discuss what they did well in their game or whatever it was that they just lost. Point out the good and then ask them what they think they could improve upon. Let them think introspectively on this, rather than you pointing it out. Otherwise, you will just come across as the critical parent, which is insult to injury following a loss.

                    Talk about responsibility for their actions

                    We all have encountered that adult in life who constantly blames other people for the bad things that happen in their life. It is never their own fault. It is always someone else that has caused their demise. These adults were once children. This behavior likely started in childhood and they never overcame this attitude. They don’t know how to accept responsibility for their actions.

                    Parents must teach their children from a young age to take responsibility for their wrong doings. If they make a mistake they own up to it. Instead of belittling the child for their wrong doing, use it as a learning opportunity. Engage them in a discussion about what happened and why. Allow them to take responsibility and ownership of their role in the situation, yet follow it up with discussion on how it is an opportunity for the child to learn and grow. They can have a different course of action the next time something similar happens. Help them determine a better action for handling the situation, so the next time it arises, they are better equipped mentally and emotionally to take on the event, person, or circumstance.

                    “I am sorry” is a powerful phrase. Adults that fail to apologize, were not properly taught as kids to use this phrase. Teach your children to use it now and use it often. For the big mistakes and the little mistakes. When they apologize, they should be taught to be specific with their apology. “I am sorry for (fill in the blank)”. Taking responsibility means a heartfelt apology. Often they need to understand how their actions hurt the other person in order to provide a heartfelt apology. If they don’t understand how the other person is feeling, it is hard to feel sorry for the action. Therefore, a parent who can take the time to help the child understand how the hurt party is feeling will better equip your child with empathy and compassion.

                    For example, if your child stole their best friend’s new ball cap, then sit down and have a conversation with your child before you take them to their friend’s home to return the hat and apologize. You ask your child, “how would you feel if you had the hat stolen and it was something you worked hard for doing chores to raise the money to purchase the hat or it was a gift from a relative you love greatly?” Help them empathize with the loss that their friend may be feeling. Rather than yell at them for their wrong doing, use it as an opportunity to learn from their mistake and become better. Having to return the hat and apologize will be a punishment in itself.

                    Talk about the value of a dollar

                    It is important to talk about money from a young age. Children need to learn about the value of money and its essential nature in our lives. Talking about money and cost of living should be an on-going conversation in your household. They need to understand that food, a home, transportation, and clothing all require money. Money comes from working. They should also see that there are times when you too can’t have something you desire. Talk openly about a budget, so that one day when you say “it is not in the budget”, they understand what you mean.

                    It is difficult for a child to understand the value of a dollar if they have never had to earn one. One of the best ways for a child to learn to appreciate the value of a dollar is for them to earn money. If they are too young to be employed, they can still earn cash in the neighborhood shoveling driveways, babysitting, dog walking, pet sitting, and working for friends and neighbors. They can also begin doing household chores and be provided an allowance for the chores that they complete. If you already have chores and they are required as a part of being a member of the family or household, then provide extra jobs over and above the regular chores that they can then earn money for completing. The point is for them to earn it themselves. They do the work and they earn a fair wage.

                    Don’t be indulgent and over pay your child for the chores they complete or you are undermining your efforts to teach them the value of a dollar. Make a list of the chores and the amount of money they will earn for completing the jobs. This way they know what is exactly expected and how much money they can earn. Then when it comes time for the next special toy or technology they come asking for, you can help them earn it rather than give it to them.

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                    Just say no and make them work for it

                    You are the parent. You can say “no”. You should say “no”. Have you ever met a child who has never been told “no” by their parents? If you have, you know that child is the most spoiled kid in need of a serious attitude adjustment. When parents are quick to say yes all the time, then kids grow up thinking that the world will say “yes” to their every whim and desire. That’s not the real world though.

                    Our kids will experience rejection, heartache, and being told no many times in the course of their life. If they can experience it in the home and learn how to handle the “no” and deal with it, they are better off in the long run. They will be better equipped to handle a no in the real world, because you have said no enough times that they can emotionally handle the disappointment. They also know the alternatives. For example, if its a new video game that they want, you tell them no, you must earn it. From there the child goes to look at the chart and calculates which and how many of the chores they must complete in order to earn the video game. They will also learn other valuable skills in this process, such as time management, because they will need to set aside time every day for a number of days or weeks to complete all the tasks to earn the amount of money they need.

                    Saying “no” and providing alternatives for your child to earn what they want is empowering. You are teaching them to fish. An old proverb says,

                    “if you give a man a fish he will eat for a day, if you teach a man to fish he will eat for a lifetime”.

                    Teach your child how to earn for themselves so they can be better equipped for a lifetime.

                    Delayed gratification is also powerful. When children learn that they can earn something for themselves that they truly want, then when they do finally earn it they feel empowered. They worked hard and they made their goal happen. They earned it themselves. This is a powerful agent to help increase self esteem. Keep the chore list going, so that your child has the opportunity to grow their self worth by completing tasks and earning the things that they want in life.

                    Help them find gratitude

                    Much like teaching your children the art of being a good loser and how to apologize, teaching gratitude is an ongoing lesson. There is a saying,

                    “Gratitude begins where my sense of entitlement ends.”

                    Children learn to be grateful first when they do not get everything they desire. What happens when they get everything they want and ask for is that they expect everything they ask for. You set the expectation by saying “yes” too often. Allow for them to want. Not for basic necessities of course, but for things above and beyond the essentials in life. They will become grateful for the things that they do get when they are not handed everything they ask for.

                    Teach them to say thank you. Talk about how when someone gives them a nice gift that person (or their Mom or Dad) had to go to work to earn the money to buy that gift. Talk about how it is nice to have generous friends and family because not everyone has that in their life. Make them responsible for thanking others, both verbally and in writing. When your child receives a gift have them write a thank you note in return. It does not need to be long and eloquent. Just the practice of taking the time to write thank you and that the gift is appreciated helps them practice gratitude. They can carry this valuable skill into adulthood.

                    Grateful people are also happier people, so help your child see that they should be grateful for the blessings, big and small, in their life.

                    Help them practice giving back to other

                    Find opportunities for you and your child to give back to others. It can be through material things, but even more valuable when your time is given. Giving your time with your child to others is of great value and a great life lesson. Your child being exposed to others less fortunate is helpful in curbing entitlement.

                    Kids Giving Back supports families getting into their community to give back. They state,

                    We strongly believe that when young people volunteer they develop respect, resilience, and leadership skills, as well as the ability and opportunity to positively engage in the wider community. Our philosophy embraces volunteering as a two-way street, giving children and their families an opportunity to change lives, including their own.

                    Teaching your child to give back to others is empowering to them on so many levels from creating leadership skills, problem solving skills, and self esteem from the experience of helping others in need. Teaching kids that there are others in the world that have so much less than them will help them become more grateful. Having them serve others also makes them more service oriented and creates an awareness of the need to help others in this world.

                    Entitlement attitudes fall by the wayside when a child has learned the value and importance of helping others and giving to others in need.

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