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When Do You Start Showing In Pregnancy? Here’re The Month-by-Month Pregnant Belly Pictures

When Do You Start Showing In Pregnancy? Here’re The Month-by-Month Pregnant Belly Pictures

Month One

month one pregnant belly front and side

    Congratulations you are pregnant! However, chances are you might not even know it yet. The first two weeks consist of ovulation, which means there is no baby yet. It isn’t until the third week where conception takes place. Hello sperm, meet egg. Once fertilized, the egg will then divide and divide into what will appear as a ball of cells called a blastocyst. The blastocyst begins its journey from your fallopian tubes down to your uterus, it’s new home for the next nine months. By the end of month one, the blastocyst will begin implanting itself to the uterine lining and become an embryo. Your little ball of cells will then divide into two parts – one half being your future baby boy or girl and the other half will become the placenta – your baby’s lifeline during its time in the uterus.

    Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

    Your baby is no bigger than the size of a poppyseed, about 2 mm long. Your belly won’t have visibly changed, showing no signs of a baby…yet.

    Month Two

    month two pregnant belly front and side view

      If you didn’t know you were pregnant last month, then you’ll definitely know it this month. The telltale symptoms of pregnancy are starting to creep up: nausea, fatigue, constant peeing and food aversions and cravings. The first circulatory system to develop in your baby is the heart and this month it takes shape. Some other big contenders in the making are: kidneys, liver and lungs. Your baby is also starting to grow some human like features complete with little arms and legs.

      Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

      Your baby has graduated from the size of a poppyseed to the size of a raspberry, about 1/2 an inch. To you, you might start to see and feel a little difference in your mid section. It might feel slightly firmer than usual, however outsiders are still unable to notice anything going on.

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      Month Three

      month three pregnant belly

        This marks the end of your first trimester and pregnancy symptoms are most likely still going strong. Every woman and pregnancy is different so whatever symptoms you may be feeling may not be the same as others or even your previous pregnancies. Along with the ending of the first trimester comes the next stage in your baby’s development from embryo to fetus. Those little arms and legs will begin to make movements however it’ll be at least another month before you actually feel them. Don’t be too disappointed because during this month you should be able to finally hear your baby’s heartbeat on a Doppler device. Also equally exciting is your baby is developing its sex organs and is soon going to be a he or a she. Again, it’s too early to find out the sex though.

        Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

        Your baby has more than doubled in size and by the end of month three should be about 2.5-3 inches long, the size of a peach. Making room for that baby in the uterus your waist may start to thicken. You may notice your pants starting to feel a bit more snug and, even though it may be slight, a tiny bump starting to form at the bottom.

        Month Four

        month four pregnant belly

          The beginning of the second trimester also welcomes a nice break from all the horrible pregnancy feels you may have been experiencing in the first trimester. If you’re lucky you might start feeling less queasy, have more energy and feeling a little more like yourself again….only pregnant. This is also when fetuses start to grow at different rates, an early sign of their very individual traits. Your baby is starting to grow some hair! For some, possibly on its head but also some body hair will be sprouting called lanugo. Lanugo is like a downy fur coating which helps keep your baby warm. Your baby is also moving alot more now, being able to wiggle its little fingers and toes but also he or she can breathe, suck and swallow now too. Baby’s muscles are getting stronger and you might even feel a few kicks during this month too.

          Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

          Your baby is about the size of your palm now measuring in at approximately 5 inches long by the end of the month. Your belly continues to grow and become more pronounced. This is usually around the time where some women decide to start spreading the news as it starts to become harder to hide the belly. If this is not the case you might be wondering “When do you start showing in pregnancy?”. Remember every woman and every baby is different, for some the belly starts showing early but others it might not start popping out into a little later down the road.

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          Month Five
          five months pregnant belly

            As you probably already know (and feel) baby is growing and developing at a rapid speed. He is also learning a whole bunch of new skills such as yawning and hiccuping (which you might even be able to feel as well). Your baby is also coming into his own because he now has his own set of unique finger and toe prints. Also your baby’s sense are starting to develop, and just in time because the amniotic fluid is changing day to day depending on what you eat. Start them early with healthy food habits.

            Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

            The baby is about 7 inches long now and approximately the size of a large banana. He’s also weighing in over a whole entire 1 lb now! This is the month where you start to show much more noticeably. You might even find that strangers are starting to comment on your pregnant status. Bellies vary, some sit very low, some high and some right in the middle. An old wives’ tale states that the way your belly sits is directly linked to the sex of your child, but that is nothing but an old wives’ tale.

            Month Six

            month six pregnant belly

              Up until this point your baby has been mostly skinny for the most part, but that’s about to change because fat will start to develop this month. The all important lungs are almost fully developed and along with it the ability to breathe. Baby’s nostrils will begin to open up and he can now practice breathing and hiccuping as well (you’ll feel and maybe even see lots of those). Your baby will start looking a lot more like he will when he’s born as his face is almost fully formed and his eyes begin to open. With heightened senses come more awareness of a world outside of the womb. If you shine a bright light at your belly or even make a loud noise, you might startle your baby!

              Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

              This month your baby will have almost doubled its length and weight since last month coming in at approximately 15 inches long and around 2 lbs. This is apparent in your belly as it rounds out more and becomes more pronounced. Your uterus is about the size of a basketball now and folks might even accuse you of smuggling one under your shirt.

              Month Seven

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              month seven pregnant belly

                Welcome to the third and final trimester. Your little one is mastering some skills in the womb such as blinking, coughing and even dreaming because REM (rapid eye movement) sleep is starting. Matching your baby’s new repertoire of skills comes the massive development of his brain. Things are getting cramped in there so you’ll be feeling your baby move more and more.

                Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

                Your baby’s growth is starting to slow down as it gets closer to the delivery date. Your baby is weighing in at approximately 3 lbs and measuring 18 inches long. Remember this varies from baby to baby especially now because your baby is getting closer to his actual length and weight at time of birth.

                Month Eight

                eight months pregnant belly

                  Your baby is mastering the skills (swallowing, breathing, kicking and sucking) needed for when he makes his big debut. His skin is no longer see through and is opaque. Your baby is building up antibodies and developing his immune system. He is also getting into position settling into an optimal heads down and bottoms up position. This makes it much easier for mama when it comes to delivery. Some babies don’t ever get into this position though which causes problems when it comes time for birth. Although space is getting limited, baby is still very active and those cute little kicks and jabs are starting to feel more and more uncomfortable.

                  Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

                  Baby’s weight is growing steadily at an average of 1/2 lb per week while growth is starting to taper off. On average your baby may be coming in at around 20 inches long and 5 1/5 lbs. Your belly is generally the same shape as last month but it may be popping out a bit more now.

                  Month Nine

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                  nine months pregnant belly

                    So close yet so far! This will probably be the longest month as you somewhat patiently wait for the arrival of your baby. The good news is that at 37 weeks your baby is considered full term. Although this is the case, your baby hasn’t stopped growing at that point. Fat continues to accumulate, your baby practices his breathing and sucking, his systems (circulatory and musculoskeletal) are getting ready for the outside world, he’s shedding his lanugo and his skin is turning white. Yes, white because skin pigmentation doesn’t occur until shorty after birth. Also as impatient as you are so is baby as he starts getting fidgety you might notice he is starting to flip from side to side. As he starts to get into birthing position you might start to feel like it’s getting harder to breathe and even walk! Hang in there sister!

                    Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

                    Baby’s weight and size is going to vary at this point now that he’s ready to come out into the world. Full term babies can weigh anywhere from 6-10 lbs and measure approximately 19 to 22 inches. Of course there are smaller and bigger babies than that that are born perfectly healthy as well. Your belly is at its largest and curviest as it holds onto that baby tight.

                    Remember every woman is different and every pregnancy is different. Your month to month may look different than mine and my next pregnancy might even look different than this last one did too.

                    Pregnancy Resources

                    http://www.newkidscenter.com/Pregnant-Belly.html

                    What to Expect When you’re Expecting

                    Featured photo credit: Kelly Hunter via flickr.com

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                    Published on August 13, 2020

                    The Effects of Divorce on Children No Parents Should Ignore

                    The Effects of Divorce on Children No Parents Should Ignore

                    If you are parent who has gone through divorce, this article is not intended to make you feel guilty. Instead, the purpose is to help you recognize the effects of divorce on children in order to face them in the best possible way.

                    If there are problems or issues with your child as a result of the divorce, there is hope. There is help available. The first step is recognizing any effects the divorce has had which caused your child to have social, emotional, physical, or cognitive issues. Behavioral issues are the most common signal that your child is not coping well with the divorce situation.

                    Some kids go though divorce and are not adversely affected. Even in situations when things are very tumultuous during the divorce, a child can appear unaffected. There are other children who are traumatized and exhibit emotional and/or behavioral problems when their parents’ divorce has been calm and amicable. It goes to show that the a child’s reaction to divorce greatly varies from one child to the next.

                    A 2014 study cited that, in evaluating three decades of research, children are statistically better off emotionally, mentally, and physically if their parents can stick together, stay married, and work through their problems[1]. The only exception to this is if abuse is present.

                    However, it doesn’t always work out that way. Divorce is a reality in our culture and world today. Therefore, we need to be more aware of how a divorce may affect our children, recognizing signs if there are any issues with your child, and then getting them the help that is needed. It is difficult to help a child with a problem if you don’t first recognize that it exists.

                    This article is help you better identify behavioral problems that may stem from unprocessed emotions associated with a divorce.

                    You can do all the right things, meaning you get the child counseling, keep them out of the adult issues, and share parenting duties amicably, yet the child can still have behavioral issues. Therefore, even if you have checked all the boxes and done all the things to protect your child during the divorce, you should still be aware of the potential for problems with your child as a result.

                    Every child is different. You can have two children in the same household, and one appears to process the divorce fine, and the other has apparent behavioral issues that arise as a consequence of the divorce. This is not uncommon. It is because every person is different and unique, as is their ability to cope with stress, anxiety, and major life changes.

                    There is no guilt needed or shaming involved. If you are divorced, you are not alone. In fact, you are part of a growing cohort of people around the world. With the high number of divorces in countries around the world, and children being affected, we need to prepare ourselves with information on the effects of divorce on children and learn to recognize when our children need help.

                    How Children Think About Divorce

                    Kids don’t think logically. They lack the world experience and knowledge that adults possess. This means that when things like divorce occur, they may not have logical thoughts about what is happening to their family.

                    There are children who will think it is their fault, or that if they act better or try harder that their parents will stay together. Not all children will think this way, but many will have thoughts that are not logical, rational, or healthy.

                    It is imperative that adults have conversations with their children so that the child knows that the divorce and situation is not their fault. Parents should have a cohesive plan on how to talk to their children about divorce. Dr. Kevin D. Arnold, PhD, explains that parents should help their children process the emotions they have about divorce:

                    “Parents desire to shield their children from pain, let alone want to cause their babies to suffer. But, suffering happens. Divorcing parents have an opportunity to teach their children how to handle pain effectively. In every dire circumstance exists the chance to learn and grow; parents who use divorce as one such chance can help their children learn this fundamental truth.”[2]

                    It is not about protecting our children from the divorce, because if divorce is imminent, then it is a reality of the child’s world. The key is helping children effectively navigate and process their feelings and emotions as they go through this major change in their family.

                    Sadness and Other Feelings

                    For children, one of the most common reactions to divorce is sadness, according to Dr. Lori Rappaport[3]. Children will cry and often act sad as their parents go through a divorce. This sadness can sometimes lead to depression, and those signs should be identified so that professional help can be be sought.

                    Such signs can include loss of interest in activities, inability to sleep, sleeping too much, suddenly having problems with academics, fighting, or getting in trouble at school for behavioral issues. There are other signs as well.

                    Some children will actually feel relieved that their parents are getting divorced. In many homes where divorce occurs, there is a high level of emotional conflict. The children of high-conflict parents will often feel relief that the arguments and conflict will be coming to an end in the home.

                    Likely, there is usually a mix of emotions. They feel sad and relieved. They can experience these feelings back and forth over time as they process the divorce, which usually takes years.

                    Many children of divorce will also feel frightened because they don’t know what their life is going to look like in the future. Their future is filled with uncertainty. They also will feel angry that their family is changing and that they may have to make major life adjustments, such as a new home or a new school.

                    It’s normal for children to have these emotions. What is not the norm, and requires intervention, is when children have behavioral issues that affect the way they function in daily life.

                    At What Age Are Kids Affected by Divorce?

                    Kids are affected by divorce at any age. Even adults who have their parents divorce later in life can be adversely affected. According to Dr. Rappaport, even babies and toddlers can be affected by divorce. The separation from one parent when they have to go to another parent’s home can cause separation anxiety for a baby or toddler.

                    Knowing that anyone at any age can be affected by parental divorce means that we must not exclude children when assessing the effects of a divorce. Just because they are old enough to understand does not mean that they automatically have the coping skills to adjust in a healthy and appropriate manner.

                    The same is true for young children. Just because they are young and do not fully understand what is going on does not mean that they won’t be affected. Major changes in a young child’s routine because of divorce can cause them distress, which can result in things such as regression.

                    Signs That Your Child Is Not Coping Well

                    When a child is not coping well with their emotions associated with a divorce, it will typically be seen in their behavior. What they don’t express in their words will usually come out in problematic ways. Their behavior will change, and it is for the worse when they are not coping well with the divorce.

                    It is normal for a child to have emotions, thoughts, and feelings about divorce. It is common for children (research shows between 20-50% of children of divorce have maladjustment) to have behavioral issues because of divorce. However, behavioral problems and maladjustment are signs that a child is not coping well and that professional intervention, such as counseling, is needed.

                    Below are some of the more common behavioral issues that arise in children when their parents are going through a divorce and they are not coping well. These are not the only behavioral issues that can present, but are some of the more common.

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                    Regression

                    This behavior is more often seen in younger children. For example, children who are already potty-trained will begin having accidents or wetting their bed at night. They may resume thumb sucking or other babyish behavior that they had previously outgrown. Regression is a sign that a child is not coping well with the situation and some professional help may be needed. For younger children, play therapy can be helpful.

                    Developmental Delays

                    Children who have been achieving their milestones normally and then begin to exhibit delays should be assessed. For example, a baby who sat up and crawled at a normal age of development, but who is now clingy and not walking at 24 months should be taken to their pediatrician for assessment.

                    Needy Behavior

                    Young children who cannot express themselves in words will often show behavioral indications when something is bothering them. For a child going through divorce, some forms of neediness can be normal. They want to spend more time with their parents when they get time with them. They may cry more frequently when they transition from home to daycare or from one parent’s home to the other.

                    When it comes to the effects of divorce on children, parents need to be aware of the neediness behaviors that can arise. If they become disruptive to daily life, then a child psychologist or counselor may need to be consulted. They will have some solutions and be able to assess a family’s unique situation. Parents must recognize that extreme neediness is not normal, and help should be sought in such a case.

                    Temper Tantrums or Outbursts

                    Temper tantrums are normal for children under the age of five. In fact they are quite common for 2-3 year olds. However, in some cases where a divorce is happening, the tantrums become far more frequent. For children over the of five, they can regress and begin having temper tantrums once again. It is an indication that their situation is overwhelming them, and they are having difficulty coping.

                    For older children, such as teens, they may have emotional outbursts. These outbursts can be characterized with screaming, yelling, obstinance, and a lack of logic and rational thought while they are in this state.

                    If these behaviors are present outside of the normal age-appropriate temper tantrums, then counseling or professional help should be sought for the child so that they can learn to process their feelings and emotions in a healthy manner.

                    Getting in Trouble at School

                    Children who have previously not been trouble makers at school and then begin a pattern of getting in trouble with authority should not be ignored. Their behavior is a way of acting out for attention or as a channel for their emotions. They may be feeling angry about their parents divorce.

                    When asked about the divorce, they tell their parents they are fine and that everything is okay. They don’t know how to properly express how they are feeling, and they instead repress their emotions. Then, when things get tough at school, they act out by kicking the child’s chair in front of them or pushing their classmates.

                    They do these behaviors as a channel or avenue for them to get out their anger. However, this is not a healthy way for them to process their anger towards the divorce. They should be taught by a professional how to talk and process their anger appropriately.

                    Fighting With Other Kids

                    Along with getting in trouble at school, some children will turn their anger, rage, and stress into aggressiveness toward their peers. They may get in fights and conflict with friends or classmates when, previously, this was never an issue.

                    Parents should help these children by getting them the help that they need to understand that their feelings are normal and they can talk about it instead of bottling up the anger and then allowing it to explode on others.

                    Eating Issues

                    When some children don’t cope well with a divorce situation, they can develop eating problems. For teens, this can be a legitimate eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia. For younger children it can even manifest as avoidance of food or extreme picky eating that can lead to an eating disorder such as ARFID (avoidant resistant food intake disorder). This can be one of the most dangerous effects of divorce on children as it can lead to serious health issues.

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                    Parents should be aware of their children’s changed behavior, and especially eating patterns that may be detrimental to the child’s health in the long term. For some children this can also include binge-eating. They don’t express their feelings in words, and instead they eat to find a sense of comfort. This can lead to health problems such as obesity, diabetes, and high blood pressure if the behavior becomes severe or pervasive over a long time period.

                    There are treatment programs and counselors that can specifically help if eating problems begin to manifest as a pattern of behavior. Parents must be vigilant and aware of the eating habits of their children, especially when major life changes, such as a divorce, are happening. It is easier to treat such a problem earlier, before the behaviors and habits become ingrained.

                    Sleep Issues

                    Children of divorced parents can experience insomnia. They can also sleep too much if they are becoming depressed. Their sleep routines should be consistent from one parent’s home to the other so that they don’t develop disruptive sleep problems. If a child does display significant sleep issues, then a pediatrician’s help should be sought for advice.

                    Risky Behavior

                    It is normal for teens to experience some sort of rebellion. However, if that rebellion turns into the form of drug use or running away from home, then professional help must be sought. Risky behavior is a cry for help. Their cry for help should be met with love, care, and a desire to get them the help that they need.

                    Drop in Academic Performance

                    Academic performance can fluctuate. However, a severe plummet in grades and academic performance should not be ignored. For example, a child that goes from straight A’s as a motivated student and then drops down to all C’s in one semester’s time is likely having issues coping.

                    Their academics may be suffering because they are depressed, or they can no longer find the ability to concentrate during class. Parents should help their child, not only with tutoring and academic help alone. The emotional state of their child should be addressed with counseling.

                    There are likely underlying emotional issues happening when their parents’ divorce, and a significant drop in their academic performance indicates they are not processing their emotions correctly, as it is impeding their academic life.

                    Suicidal Thoughts

                    Suicidal thoughts, and especially any suicide attempts, require immediate intervention and help. When someone expresses that they want to die or that they want to kill themselves, these words must always be taken seriously.

                    There are some teens and pre-teens who “attempt” suicide as a cry for help. Their intention is not death, but instead it is to get their parent’s attention. Unfortunately, some of the “attempts” are successful and result in death. This is why words of wanting death or to commit suicide should always be taken seriously.

                    You may think that your child would never follow through, but they may do so simply to prove their point, and will, unfortunately, in some instances, be successful. If you have a loved one who has exhibited suicidal behavior or has threatened suicide, there is immediate help via the Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

                    Self-Injury

                    Professionals are becoming increasingly aware of self-injury and self-mutilation behaviors in teens and pre-teens. Teens tend to hide these behaviors and will cut themselves in places that are less visible, such as their upper thighs or stomach. However, some are more apparent and obvious with their behaviors.

                    Either way, immediate help should be sought if you have a child who is harming themselves. They are not coping with their mental and emotional stress in a healthy way. Self-harm or self-injury can include cutting, carving into their skin, burning themselves, pulling out their hair, and more.

                    If you think your child may be harming themselves, they need immediate help. Please go to the Crisis Text Line if you want more information about how children inflict self-harm or if you believe your child is harming themselves. You can reach out to immediate help via that website.

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                    Incarceration

                    When teens or pre-teens start getting into trouble and get themselves arrested, it is a cry for help. Don’t ignore their bad behavior and chalk it up to them just being a teen. If they are experiencing the divorce of their parents, this behavior can stem from emotional turmoil that has gone untreated. Even if they did receive some counseling previously, they may likely need help and intervention once again.

                    Somatic Issues

                    A common sign of distress in children when they are having emotional problems is somatic issues. This usually exhibits in the form of repeated headaches, stomach pains, or other physical ailments. They can be real or imagined.

                    Often, the emotions drive the pain or physical ailment to become real. For example, a child may complain of stomach pains daily, especially when they have to transition from one parent’s home to the other. What may begin as an invention in their mind can become real as the body responds to the stress and unresolved emotions in problematic ways.

                    If your child has repeated physical complaints, such as headaches, stomach pains, or other issues, do not ignore their complaints.

                    Helping Your Child Become Emotionally Intelligent

                    Emotionally intelligent people are able to express their feelings and process them in a healthy manner so that they don’t repress emotions. Repressing emotions often leads to behavioral problems, such as those discussed previously.

                    We can help our children learn to become emotionally intelligent by teaching them how to talk about the way that they feel. It is often a learned behavior that does not come through instinct alone. Children should be taught how to appropriately talk about and process their feelings and emotions.

                    There are many ways parents can teach their children to express their emotions in a healthy manner[4], including:

                    • Help your child identify the name of the feeling they are experiencing.
                    • Talk about healthy ways of dealing with emotions, such as talking things out and deep breathing exercises.
                    • Be a nurturing connection to your child so that they feel that they can come to their parent when they are experiencing heightened emotions.
                    • Resist punishment when they are acting out of emotional turmoil; instead, work to help them talk about their emotions and feelings.
                    • Have your child practice talking about their feelings, and praise them when they talk and express themselves.

                    It is not easy for parent or child to go through the a divorce situation. Parents should be aware of the emotional turmoil that their child is likely going through, so they can encourage them to express it through healthy dialogue and conversations.

                    The Help Available for Children of Divorce

                    There are counselors, psychologists, therapists, and play therapists available for help to your family. You can simply google the area where you live and “divorce counseling,” and you should find qualified professionals near you.

                    Divorce Care 4 Kids[5]is a support group program with curriculum designed to help children ages 5-12 whose parents have gone through divorce. There are groups that facilitate this program all over the world. The programs tend to be low cost or, in some cases, free.

                    Do your children need DC4K? Here is what they say on their website about their program:

                    “Your kids probably feel scared, sad, and confused after your divorce. They know you have been hurt deeply. As a result, they may hide their feelings because they are worried about your happiness or because they do not know how to express their feelings appropriately. DC4K helps them process those feelings and gives them tools to communicate better with you.”

                    Final Thoughts

                    Many children process through divorce without serious problems. However, we can never be sure which children will have issues in handling a divorce. When parents are able to identify behavioral issues and problems that arise during or following a divorce, they can help their child get the help that they need.

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                    Behavioral issues tend to be an indication that the child is not properly processing their emotions. Hope is found in providing the help that your child needs. Being their support system to help them talk about their feelings is helpful, as is seeking professional counseling when behavioral problems arise.

                    More on the Effects of Divorce on Children

                    Featured photo credit: Joseph Gonzalez via unsplash.com

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