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When Do You Start Showing In Pregnancy? Here’re The Month-by-Month Pregnant Belly Pictures

When Do You Start Showing In Pregnancy? Here’re The Month-by-Month Pregnant Belly Pictures

Month One

month one pregnant belly front and side

    Congratulations you are pregnant! However, chances are you might not even know it yet. The first two weeks consist of ovulation, which means there is no baby yet. It isn’t until the third week where conception takes place. Hello sperm, meet egg. Once fertilized, the egg will then divide and divide into what will appear as a ball of cells called a blastocyst. The blastocyst begins its journey from your fallopian tubes down to your uterus, it’s new home for the next nine months. By the end of month one, the blastocyst will begin implanting itself to the uterine lining and become an embryo. Your little ball of cells will then divide into two parts – one half being your future baby boy or girl and the other half will become the placenta – your baby’s lifeline during its time in the uterus.

    Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

    Your baby is no bigger than the size of a poppyseed, about 2 mm long. Your belly won’t have visibly changed, showing no signs of a baby…yet.

    Month Two

    month two pregnant belly front and side view

      If you didn’t know you were pregnant last month, then you’ll definitely know it this month. The telltale symptoms of pregnancy are starting to creep up: nausea, fatigue, constant peeing and food aversions and cravings. The first circulatory system to develop in your baby is the heart and this month it takes shape. Some other big contenders in the making are: kidneys, liver and lungs. Your baby is also starting to grow some human like features complete with little arms and legs.

      Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

      Your baby has graduated from the size of a poppyseed to the size of a raspberry, about 1/2 an inch. To you, you might start to see and feel a little difference in your mid section. It might feel slightly firmer than usual, however outsiders are still unable to notice anything going on.

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      Month Three

      month three pregnant belly

        This marks the end of your first trimester and pregnancy symptoms are most likely still going strong. Every woman and pregnancy is different so whatever symptoms you may be feeling may not be the same as others or even your previous pregnancies. Along with the ending of the first trimester comes the next stage in your baby’s development from embryo to fetus. Those little arms and legs will begin to make movements however it’ll be at least another month before you actually feel them. Don’t be too disappointed because during this month you should be able to finally hear your baby’s heartbeat on a Doppler device. Also equally exciting is your baby is developing its sex organs and is soon going to be a he or a she. Again, it’s too early to find out the sex though.

        Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

        Your baby has more than doubled in size and by the end of month three should be about 2.5-3 inches long, the size of a peach. Making room for that baby in the uterus your waist may start to thicken. You may notice your pants starting to feel a bit more snug and, even though it may be slight, a tiny bump starting to form at the bottom.

        Month Four

        month four pregnant belly

          The beginning of the second trimester also welcomes a nice break from all the horrible pregnancy feels you may have been experiencing in the first trimester. If you’re lucky you might start feeling less queasy, have more energy and feeling a little more like yourself again….only pregnant. This is also when fetuses start to grow at different rates, an early sign of their very individual traits. Your baby is starting to grow some hair! For some, possibly on its head but also some body hair will be sprouting called lanugo. Lanugo is like a downy fur coating which helps keep your baby warm. Your baby is also moving alot more now, being able to wiggle its little fingers and toes but also he or she can breathe, suck and swallow now too. Baby’s muscles are getting stronger and you might even feel a few kicks during this month too.

          Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

          Your baby is about the size of your palm now measuring in at approximately 5 inches long by the end of the month. Your belly continues to grow and become more pronounced. This is usually around the time where some women decide to start spreading the news as it starts to become harder to hide the belly. If this is not the case you might be wondering “When do you start showing in pregnancy?”. Remember every woman and every baby is different, for some the belly starts showing early but others it might not start popping out into a little later down the road.

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          Month Five
          five months pregnant belly

            As you probably already know (and feel) baby is growing and developing at a rapid speed. He is also learning a whole bunch of new skills such as yawning and hiccuping (which you might even be able to feel as well). Your baby is also coming into his own because he now has his own set of unique finger and toe prints. Also your baby’s sense are starting to develop, and just in time because the amniotic fluid is changing day to day depending on what you eat. Start them early with healthy food habits.

            Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

            The baby is about 7 inches long now and approximately the size of a large banana. He’s also weighing in over a whole entire 1 lb now! This is the month where you start to show much more noticeably. You might even find that strangers are starting to comment on your pregnant status. Bellies vary, some sit very low, some high and some right in the middle. An old wives’ tale states that the way your belly sits is directly linked to the sex of your child, but that is nothing but an old wives’ tale.

            Month Six

            month six pregnant belly

              Up until this point your baby has been mostly skinny for the most part, but that’s about to change because fat will start to develop this month. The all important lungs are almost fully developed and along with it the ability to breathe. Baby’s nostrils will begin to open up and he can now practice breathing and hiccuping as well (you’ll feel and maybe even see lots of those). Your baby will start looking a lot more like he will when he’s born as his face is almost fully formed and his eyes begin to open. With heightened senses come more awareness of a world outside of the womb. If you shine a bright light at your belly or even make a loud noise, you might startle your baby!

              Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

              This month your baby will have almost doubled its length and weight since last month coming in at approximately 15 inches long and around 2 lbs. This is apparent in your belly as it rounds out more and becomes more pronounced. Your uterus is about the size of a basketball now and folks might even accuse you of smuggling one under your shirt.

              Month Seven

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              month seven pregnant belly

                Welcome to the third and final trimester. Your little one is mastering some skills in the womb such as blinking, coughing and even dreaming because REM (rapid eye movement) sleep is starting. Matching your baby’s new repertoire of skills comes the massive development of his brain. Things are getting cramped in there so you’ll be feeling your baby move more and more.

                Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

                Your baby’s growth is starting to slow down as it gets closer to the delivery date. Your baby is weighing in at approximately 3 lbs and measuring 18 inches long. Remember this varies from baby to baby especially now because your baby is getting closer to his actual length and weight at time of birth.

                Month Eight

                eight months pregnant belly

                  Your baby is mastering the skills (swallowing, breathing, kicking and sucking) needed for when he makes his big debut. His skin is no longer see through and is opaque. Your baby is building up antibodies and developing his immune system. He is also getting into position settling into an optimal heads down and bottoms up position. This makes it much easier for mama when it comes to delivery. Some babies don’t ever get into this position though which causes problems when it comes time for birth. Although space is getting limited, baby is still very active and those cute little kicks and jabs are starting to feel more and more uncomfortable.

                  Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

                  Baby’s weight is growing steadily at an average of 1/2 lb per week while growth is starting to taper off. On average your baby may be coming in at around 20 inches long and 5 1/5 lbs. Your belly is generally the same shape as last month but it may be popping out a bit more now.

                  Month Nine

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                  nine months pregnant belly

                    So close yet so far! This will probably be the longest month as you somewhat patiently wait for the arrival of your baby. The good news is that at 37 weeks your baby is considered full term. Although this is the case, your baby hasn’t stopped growing at that point. Fat continues to accumulate, your baby practices his breathing and sucking, his systems (circulatory and musculoskeletal) are getting ready for the outside world, he’s shedding his lanugo and his skin is turning white. Yes, white because skin pigmentation doesn’t occur until shorty after birth. Also as impatient as you are so is baby as he starts getting fidgety you might notice he is starting to flip from side to side. As he starts to get into birthing position you might start to feel like it’s getting harder to breathe and even walk! Hang in there sister!

                    Baby vs. Belly Shape and Size

                    Baby’s weight and size is going to vary at this point now that he’s ready to come out into the world. Full term babies can weigh anywhere from 6-10 lbs and measure approximately 19 to 22 inches. Of course there are smaller and bigger babies than that that are born perfectly healthy as well. Your belly is at its largest and curviest as it holds onto that baby tight.

                    Remember every woman is different and every pregnancy is different. Your month to month may look different than mine and my next pregnancy might even look different than this last one did too.

                    Pregnancy Resources

                    http://www.newkidscenter.com/Pregnant-Belly.html

                    What to Expect When you’re Expecting

                    Featured photo credit: Kelly Hunter via flickr.com

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                    Published on May 24, 2019

                    How to Raise a Confident Child with Grit

                    How to Raise a Confident Child with Grit

                    My husband and I facilitate a couple’s marriage and parenting group. Recently, the group discussed qualities, characteristics, and traits we wanted to see our children develop as they grow up. One term that came up that all parents seemed to upon agree as a highly valued trait was that of grit. The question from our group was:

                    “Can grit be taught to our children?”

                    The answer is, yes. Parents can help their child develop grit.

                    What is grit? Dr. Angela Duckworth is the top researcher on this subject and wrote the book Grit. She defines grit as “passion and perseverance for long term goals”. This new buzz word is popular in the adult realm, but what about our developing children? What if we could help our children develop grit as young children.

                    Grit is more crucial to success than IQ. Duckworth, through her research at Harvard, found that having grit was a better predictor for an individual’s success than IQ. This means having the smartest kid in the room doesn’t ensure any level of success in their future. They can be brilliant, but if they aren’t properly intrinsically motivated, they won’t be successful.

                    Grit determines long term success. If a child can’t pick themselves up and try again after a failure, then how are they going to be able to do it as adult?

                    What a gift it would be to our children to engage them in a manner that helps them recognize their passions, talents, and develop a persevere to purse their goals. Below are some tips on how to raise a confident child with grit.

                    1. Encouragement is Key

                    When a child wants to learn how to ride a bike, do they keep going after they fall down or do they quit after the first fall?

                    If they aren’t encouraged to get up and try again, and instead are coddled and told they can try again some other day, then they are being taught to play it safe.

                    Safe and coddled don’t exactly go hand-in-hand with building up grit. The child needs to be encouraged to try again. This can be a parent saying “you can do it, I believe in you” and “I know that even if you fall again you will try again and eventually you will get the hang of it”.

                    Encouragement to keep trying so that they can build up perseverance is very helpful in building a child’s confidence. This confidence is what will help them strike out and try again.

                    If they feel that they can’t do it or shouldn’t do it, then they won’t. The mind is a powerful thing. If a child believes that they can’t be successful in doing something, then they won’t be successful. Part of building that mentality of believing in themselves comes from encouragement from their parents, care givers, and teachers.

                    Cheer Them On

                    How many times have you heard a story of success that someone had in life that all began because someone believed in that person?

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                    A coach, a mom, a teacher can have a huge impact by believing in the child’s ability to be successful and voicing that encouragement to them. Words are powerful. Use them to build up a child, by telling them that they can do it even if they have try again and again.

                    Be their support system by being their cheerleader. Cheerleaders don’t just cheer when the team is winning. They cheer words of encouragement to keep the team going.

                    The same goes with children. We need to cheer for their successes, but also cheer for them to keep going and fighting the fight when life gets tough!

                    You Can’t Force Them

                    Keep in mind that you can’t force a child to keep trying. They have to do it themselves.

                    For example, when my daughter was learning to tie her shoes, it was a real struggle. She gave up. I couldn’t make her want to try to do it again. She had to take a break from the struggle for a few months and then try again.

                    She was more successful the second time around, because she had matured and her fine motor skills had improved. It would have been ridiculous for me to force her to practice tying her shoes for the three or four months in between, with tears and arguing taking place.

                    No, instead we took a break. She tried again later. Forcing her to learn something that she wasn’t ready to learn would have pit us against one another. That would have been a poor parenting move.

                    There are boundaries that parents can set though in some cases. For example, if your child begins an activity and wants to quit mid-season because they are terrible at the sport, you have the opportunity to keep them in the sport through the end of the season to show them that quitting is not an option.

                    Although they may not win another tennis match the rest of the season or win another swimming race all year long, finishing the commitment is important. It will help with the development of grit by teaching them to persevere through the defeat. It is character building.

                    If your child is great at all things all the time, they will not develop grit. They need to try things that challenge them. When they aren’t the best at something, or for that matter, the worst, it creates an opportunity for them feel real struggle. Real struggle builds real character.

                    2. Get Them out of Their Comfort Zone

                    My daughter wanted to try cheerleading this past fall. She has never done this activity in the past, nor is she particularly coordinated (sorry sweetie). For that matter, she couldn’t even do a cartwheel when cheer season began.

                    However, we signed up because she was so excited to become a cheerleader. I signed up to coach because there was a need for more cheer coaches. We were all-in at that point.

                    Once the season began, I quickly realized that cheerleading was far outside my daughter’s comfort zone. The idea of cheerleading was great in her mind. The reality of memorizing cheers and learning physical skills that were hard for her made the experience a struggle. She wanted to quit. I said to her “no, you were the one who wanted to do this, so we finish what we started.” I had to say this more than once. I don’t think anyone on the squad knew this was the case, because she kept at it.

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                    She kept practicing those cheers every evening. It did not come naturally to her at first, so it was uncomfortable. She always seemed to be half a beat behind the other cheerleaders, which made it very awkward and uncomfortable for her. However, letting her know that quitting mid-season was not an option made her try harder. She wanted to learn the cheers so she wouldn’t stand out on the squad as the girl who didn’t know what she is doing.

                    By the end of the season, she became a decent cheerleader. Not the best, but she was no longer half a beat behind the rest. She learned skills that were hard for her to conquer. Now that she felt success in achieving something that was uncomfortable and hard for her. She knows she has it in her to do that in other areas of life.

                    That is why it’s ok for us as parents to let our kids feel the struggle and be uncomfortable. If they don’t experience it when they are young, they will as adults, but they won’t be equipped with the perseverance and inner-strength built from years of working hard through smaller struggles as they grew up.

                    Allowing our children to struggle helps them build that skill of perseverance, so that they have the grit to achieve hard things in life that they really desire to accomplish.

                    3. Allow Them To Fail

                    Your child will fail at things in life. Let them. Do not swoop in and rescue your child from their personal failures. If they don’t fail, then they don’t have the opportunity to pick themselves up and try again.

                    If I had pulled my daughter from cheerleader once I realized that it was going to be a real struggle, she wouldn’t have experienced failure and struggle. Letting her have this small failure in life taught her lessons that can’t be taught in a classroom. She learned about the power she has within herself to try harder, to practice in order to make change happen, and to push through it even when you feel like giving up because it is embarrassing.

                    Failure is embarrassing. Learning to handle embarrassment is taking on a fear. When kids learn to do this at a young age, it is practice for adult life. They will experience failure as an adult. They will be better equipped to handle life’s disappointments and failures if they have learned to handle the fear of embarrassment and failure when they are young.

                    Practice builds up the skill. Processing and handling fear, embarrassment, and failure are skills.

                    If I had pulled my daughter from cheer and allowed her to quit, I would have taken from her the opportunity to learn how to process and handle the embarrassment and failure she was experiencing at each practice and games. She learned to keep trying and that practicing the skills would lessen the embarrassment and feelings of failure.

                    Learning the value of practice and how to preserve through the fear and failure are priceless lessons. We may want to rescue our children because we want them to be successful at the things that they do, but how will they be successful in this competitive world as adults if they are provided with only opportunities in which they succeed?

                    Failure is needed to learn to thrive. Success in adulthood does not come easy to children who are protected from failure because they haven’t built up the ability to persevere.

                    Perseverance comes when they have learned time and time again how to take the fear of embarrassment and failure head on and practice to get better.

                    4. Teach Them to Try Again

                    Encourage your child to try again. Don’t let them quit on the first try.

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                    Life is hard. If we quit the first time we tried at things, we would never amount to anything in life. We need to teach our children that trying again is simply part of life.

                    Help them to give it a go by providing encouragement and support. Offer to practice with them, provide them with tutoring or coaching if necessary — whatever it takes to get them back on the proverbial horse and trying again.

                    Break it Down

                    Sometimes failure occurs because they are trying something all at one time and they haven’t mastered the smaller components.

                    For example, a math student isn’t going to jump into calculus as their first high school math course. No, of course not. They build on their skills. They begin with basic math, then algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and pre-calculus to then they get to the calculus level.

                    If they are thrown into the deep end by taking on calculus before the foundation of their math skills are built, they will fail.

                    Help your child try again by breaking down what it is they are trying to achieve.

                    Going back to my cheer example… my daughter was not the best at learning the cheers when we began. It then dawned on me that we needed to break down each cheer phrase by phrase. Once we learned the phrase and movements that went with it, we could then learn the next one. Once these were learned, we could combine the phrases, practice them together, and then try to move to learn the next phrase in the cheer. It was a tedious process, but it worked.

                    Not all skills come easy for kids. Helping them learn the skill of breaking things down into manageable tasks is another way we teach them about grit. They are learning to build skills by persisting, practicing, and building upon previous experience, knowledge, and skills.

                    Grit is put into practice in childhood when they learn how to break down large tasks into smaller achievable tasks in order to build toward a greater goal.

                    5. Let Them Find Their Passion

                    Your child may be a wonderful pianist. However, if they aren’t passionate about the skill, then they likely won’t be happy or fulfilled in becoming a concert pianist.

                    It’s great to help your child discover their talents, but also let them discover what they are passionate about in life.

                    True success will come because they are passionate about the activity, not because they are the best. The best usually become that way because they are passionate first. Therefore, let your child experience a variety of activities and interests so that they can discover what they love to do.

                    6. Praise Their Efforts, Not the Outcome

                    Praising their efforts keeps them motivated and trying. If you focus on outcome, then when they fail, they will become defeated and discouraged.

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                    Focusing on the fact that they tried hard and pointing out specific ways that they did well in terms of effort will support them in trying again. When you make a habit of focusing on outcome, then failures are avoided at all costs, including taking risks.

                    Risks are needed in order to become successful. Therefore, make a habit of praising their efforts, even when the outcome is not what they had hoped and tried for, because eventually, if they keep trying their efforts will result in success.

                    7. Be a Model of Grit

                    If you are a parent or a caregiver for a child, then you are a model to that child. Children naturally look up to the adults in their life that are closest to them, especially their parents. They will look at your ability to persevere and achieve. Your grit will show.

                    Your children are watching. They may not know the term grit, but they will learn about working hard, not giving up, trying again after failure, and all that grit entails from your actions.

                    How you handle life is being watched by your children. You can work on your own grit by reading Angela Duckworth’s book Grit .

                    Develop a Growth Mindset

                    Helping your child develop a growth mindset is also helpful to your child in their development of grit. Dr. Dweck, author of Growth Mindset and researcher at Stanford, developed a theory of fixed versus growth mindset.

                    Basically, what it means is that if you have a fixed mindset, you will fear failure and easily give up. Someone with a growth mindset believes that their talents, skills, and abilities can be improved with hard work and learning. Parents and caregivers can help with the development of a growth mindset.

                      Some of the ways that a growth mindset can be developed include:

                      • Teaching your child how the brain works: neuron connections, right brain versus left brain.
                      • Teach them to set goals.
                      • Teach them to have a “can do” attitude.
                      • Teach them to develop a strategy when they want to achieve something.
                      • Teach them that mistakes are an opportunity to learn.
                      • Teach them that failure is a normal part of life.
                      • Teach them about self talk: Self Talk Determines Your Success

                      There are a great deal of activities and materials online for helping your child develop a growth mindset including these resources below (each site contains at least some free content):

                      The Bottom Line

                      Grit is not just for adults, it is something we can help our children develop. Grit is more critical to success than IQ, so we should be helping our children develop this quality early in life.

                      As a parent, being a model of grit, is one of the first ways to help our children become “gritty”.

                      Featured photo credit: Gabriela Braga via unsplash.com

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