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25 Small Things to Do in Everyday Life to Boost Happiness

25 Small Things to Do in Everyday Life to Boost Happiness
Happiness is a big word, but it can be found in the smallest of things. Whether it’s the smell of roasted coffee beans in the morning or the simple refreshment of a good night’s sleep, it all adds up. Rinse your day for all it’s worth and find little lifts in everything you do—here are 25 on the house to get you started.
1. Wake up to music that sets the right mood (a bit of Bob Marley if you swing that way).

2. Feel the grass between your toes on a warm Sunday afternoon when there is nothing to do and nothing to worry about.

3. Savor your morning cup of coffee (don’t be in that stressful rush so early in the morning) and start your day right.

4. Sing in the shower like no one is listening.

5. Dance in a public place like no one is watching.

6. Read a good book and forget that you’re on a carriage, in rush hour, with your face in an old man’s armpit.

7. Use your lunch breaks to throw insults, jibes and food—don’t waste this hour of each day (those minutes add up).

8. Eat properly and luxuriously. Forget sad lunches (the pack of digestives left in the cupboard). Branch out with a pesto and mozzarella panini with tomatoes, or a tasty falafal salad.

9. Sleep for 7–8 hours a night, or you’ll waste precious cheerful time being tired and cranky on the train, in the bus queue, in the crowds of tourists as you leave the station.

10. Take the time to lie on the grass and make stories out of clouds, or, if it’s raining, lie on your carpet and see shapes on the ceiling.

11. Find some time to treat Mr. Tibbles to some affectionate patting and reap the rewards of pet therapy.

12. Exercise: throw some mad shapes, learn to hula, shoot hoops, whatever your hobby is make sure you’re squeezing those endorphins into your routine.

13. Take in some nice scenery: that park near your office, the vista from the top of the hill at the end of your road—let your eyes wander into the distance and feel those happy chemicals run free in your brain.

14. Eat bananas, packed full with that happy serotonin.

15. Surprise yourself with impulsive decisions and mix up your day-to-day with a new tattoo, a daring date or that risky haircut you’ve been too afraid you couldn’t pull off.

16. Ask the sexy barrista out on a date—the adrenaline rush will be worth it no matter what the reply is.

17. Make sure you’re giving the people you care about plenty of love—in a hug, a clap on the back, or a whole-hearted chest bump. Human contact is always a nice feeling (unless it’s on a packed train, in which case, it doesn’t count).

18. Reconnect with old friends and broaden your horizons with as many people in your life as possible.

19. Talk to a stranger, everyday, and spice up your communication.

20. Find new routes home, new routes out, and discover the richness of your area.

21. Make sure you’re exposed to that fresh air. The stuffy surroundings of an office could make the cheeriest go-getter wilt and grumble.

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22. Meditate for a few minutes every day, whether you enjoy twisting yourself into prestles during yoga or kneeling in a pew. Either way, you’re sure to clear your mind and gain some precious perspective.

23. Open your promotional emails. Everyday. We know you don’t want to open another Groupon ad. None of us do. But keep on top of them and one day, there might actually be no unread messages in your inbox (we can dare to dream).

24. Tell a secret. A secret a day could keep your doctors away (or at least your therapists). Don’t keep it bottled up; keep your friends close and release the inner demons. You’ll feel ten times lighter.

25. Make lists. There’s nothing more satisfying that ticking that last item on a list. Get things done, be productive and appreciate the written proof that you are amazing.

Featured photo credit: Ed Gregory via stokpic.com

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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