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7 Myths About Sugar That We Should Stop Believing Now

7 Myths About Sugar That We Should Stop Believing Now

There is a lot of misinformation floating around these days about sugar consumption and how it can affect your health. Here are some common myths that are important to dispel and in order to set the record straight once and for all.

1. Sugar is responsible for hyperactivity

This common myth has been debunked in the scientific community by extensive research. In one study where parents were told to record their child’s behavior after they were given sugar by the researchers, all the children’s behavior was described as “problematic or hyperactive”. In reality, the children were given no sugar. This myth seems to hold true because sugar is often consumed in social settings (parties, events, conferences) where there is a lot of other non-food related stimuli (visual and auditory) and this can have an affect on an individual’s mood.

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2. Sugar is the main cause for developing diabetes

Sugar is not the main culprit for individuals who develop diabetes, but is instead the result of an inactive lifestyle, poor diet and genetics. Gaining unhealthy calories from any food source definitely contributes to this disease, but eating sugar alone will not make you an automatic candidate.

3. Brown sugar has higher nutritional value than its white counterpart

You may have heard the old expression “the whiter the bread the sooner you will be dead,” and have realized the trend of switching over to not only whole grains, but brown rice as well. This rule unfortunately does not apply to sugar, since brown sugar has simply had molasses added to it. Please note that there is a difference between unrefined or raw sugar which can have a brown hue to it and is completely different in nutritional value.

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4. Natural sugar is better for you

There has been a recent appearance of “alternative sugars” on supermarket shelves. Coconut sugar, agave nectar, date sugar are advertised as healthier versions of the refined version. This claim is false, since it will always be metabolized by the body in the same way. These natural sugars have some added minerals, but the amount is minimal. A much larger amount would have to be consumed in order to reap the benefits.

5. Sugar-free labels means a product is healthier for you

If the actual food item in question is sans sugar than it is definitely healthier for your body, but this is not usually the case when sugar-free appears on a food label. This particular label often means that the item is replaced with artificial sweeteners. These can do more harm than good to you. Even natural sweeteners like Stevia can cause issues, so it is better to consume natural sugar in moderation than any amount of artificial sweeteners.

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6. Fruit is bad because it contains too much sugar

Fruit contains a high level of naturally occurring sugar named fructose. Unlike a few cookies or a piece of cake, fruit has other key nutrients like soluble fiber that helps minimize cholesterol and has anti-inflammatory properties, vitamins and antioxidants that help prevent disease. The insoluble fiber in fruit helps monitor the absorption of sugar into the blood stream and helps keep you full longer.

7. No added sugar on a product means you are in the clear

Just because a food item claims to have no added sugar in its ingredients does not always mean there is absolutely none present. Sugar has many different disguises and it is important to identity them in your groceries. It can be under names like dextrose, high-fructose corn syrup, malt syrup, fructose, and fruit juice concentrates. A good rule of thumb is that anything with the ending -“ose” translates to sugar.

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Featured photo credit: Flickr via flickr.com

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Last Updated on April 8, 2020

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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The leap happens when we realize two things:

  1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
  2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

“Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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