There can come a time in your career when you hit a brick wall and cannot advance in your position. Or you may reach a fork in the road and have to decide which direction to go in.

Today, careers are all about change. A part of that change are the times when you face a tough decision. There are no easy answers and it is hard to measure what will improve. If you are facing a tough career decision, here are some things to ask yourself:

1. Are you willing to learn new things?

Some organizations understand the need for employee engagement. Engagement is when workers feel involved and a part of the overall mission. An environment like this can offer the opportunity to learn new skills and talents. Reflect on whether you are at a stage in your career when learning something is beneficial.

2. Will you learn about yourself?

Facing a tough career decision can be a challenge. When you face that challenge which results in success, you may learn something about yourself. Maybe you are more resilient than you thought. There was a strength you did not know you had. Meeting success in our careers can have extrinsic as well as intrinsic value.

3. Does it scare you?

There are so many factors in our careers and in career change we have no control over. Intangibles can affect outcomes we did not see coming. This uncertainty can cause an amount of fear and discomfort. If the wrong decision is made, it could have negative effects on ourselves.

4. Does it change the way you think about success?

There is this conflict and balance with careers where it is about money verses fulfillment. What do you measure as success? It may be having the money you need to be comfortable. It could be the satisfaction of having a job you enjoy going to each day. It may reflect on your present circumstances as well as future goals.

5. Does it excite you to talk about it?

Many are fortunate to have the opportunity to discover careers they love. The career fits with their experience talents and passions. You may have seen people like this. When people ask them about their job, their face lights up and they cannot stop talking about it. When you consider career opportunities think about if they make you the same way.

6. Does it affect the people in your life?

You may want to do something in your career that requires a change. Are people in your life in alignment with that change? Say you have the chance to be in a sales position that is rewarding but requires travel. How will this impact your life and family? This will come into play with decisions.

7. Is it fiscally responsible?

I am sure more than one person has dreamt of quitting their job to do something like write the next great novel. Are you at a stage in your life where you can do this? People have family debt and responsibilities that need to be met. This is an integral part of any career decision.

8. Does it elevate your skills?

Any new career decision has the opportunity for personal growth. If this is important to you, it will be a factor in any career decision. It may set the tone for future career decisions as well. Reflect on how it will enhance your skills in both the short- and long-term.

9. Is it in line with your brand?

You have probably heard the phrase “personal brand”. It is who you are, what you do. It is the service you provide. Is the career decision keeping with your brand? You need to decide if it is consistent with your track record of success or if it is sending you in a new direction.

10. Does it provide value?

If you are making a career decision does it benefit you and the people you will serve? Does it solve major problems or improve quality of life?

Any difficult career decision goes well beyond the tangible aspects, like salary and benefits. Since most of our hours are spent in our careers, any decision can be important. Take a holistic approach in any choice to see what is right for you.

Featured photo credit: 29/52 choice paralysis/Lauren Macdonald via flickr.com

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