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Wanna Join Google? Check This To See Whether You Have the Potential

Wanna Join Google? Check This To See Whether You Have the Potential

What does Google look for in an employee? Truth be told, the answer is about as enigmatic as the company itself.

That said, I’ve done my best to parse all of the information out for you, so hopefully after reading this you’ll have a better idea about your potential future working for one of the world’s most powerful corporations.

If you have any of the following traits, Google’s HR department will likely covet you…

1. You have a certain “Googleyness” about you.

Yes, I know that’s sort of an abstract thing to look for in an employee. But from what I can tell, “Googleyness” simply means they want you to be able to think on your feet, take action when called upon, and work well with others.

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So if you are somebody who likes to always be given direction or are more of a “lone wolf” type, you probably wouldn’t fit all too well into the Google employee archetype. Still, there’s more to being a Google employee than “Googleyness,” as we will see below.

2. You think differently.

While Google surely cares about your grades and GPA and all that, they have made it a point to judge candidates based on how their mind works, regardless of past academic performance.

That’s not to say you’ll get a job there with a 2.5 GPA, but if say you have an incredibly unique “Googley” way of thinking and didn’t get straight As in college, you’ll probably have a leg up over other candidates who don’t mesh with the Google environment.

3. You have intellectual humility.

One I article I read made the contention that Google doesn’t care for hiring employees from top colleges. That’s really not true, as revealed by reading the comments to that piece. What is true, however, is that Google wants you to have a little bit of “intellectual humility” when it comes to your work.

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One Google employee made a point of saying, and I paraphrase, that they do not want to hire straight A students who feel they need to blame others whenever they fail. They want people who are smart, confident, and willing to admit when they are wrong given a new set of evidence.

Or in other words, you have to be both super smart and amicable enough to know when to concede a point to somebody who’s likely just as intelligent as you are.

4. You have great learning ability, even without a college degree.

While Google still hires the majority of its candidates from top flight colleges, a growing proportion of their new hires do not hold a college degree.

Their basic philosophy is that you can’t judge a potential employee’s true value based solely on a degree, no matter how impressive it is. They believe that those without degrees can be just as productive and successful if they have the requisite traits (e.g. leadership, “Googleyness,” and overall intelligence).

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While having a college degree is certainly great evidence of one’s work ethic and ability to think, there are plenty of people who don’t hold degrees who have just as much if not more to offer Google, and these are the folks they want to take advantage of.

As you might have thought, Google’s decision to hire non-college graduates was a bit of a shock to the business world. Indeed, by doing this, Google is shifting the way companies think about their hiring processes, which hopefully benefits us all in the future.

5. You can persevere, despite tough odds.

Based on the math, your chances of being hired at Google are pretty slim. Indeed, out of 3 million applicants a year, Google only hires 7,000.

Which essentially means you have a 0.2% chance of being taken on board at Google (for perspective, it’s far more likely that you’re admitted into a PhD program at an Ivy League).

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Millions want to work for Google, and thus, there’s a lot of competition to deal with. That’s why it’s important to brush up on the other points on this list, so that you have the best chance possible of being hired.

That said, if you show a certain amount of perseverance and determination in your interview, you’ll do just fine. Google goes through a lot of applicants, but that shouldn’t deter you.

On the contrary, it should convince you to try even harder, a quality that those at Google will be sure to pick up on.

Do you think you have what it takes to work at Google? Have you already applied? What was your experience? Comment below and let us know!

Featured photo credit: Google/ Carlos Luna via flickr.com

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Published on March 26, 2019

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Career Change (Step-By-Step Guide)

Embarking on a career change, tiny or big, can be paralyzing. Regardless of the reason for your desired career change, you need to be very clear on ‘why’ you are making a change. This is essential because you need to have clarity and be confident in your career direction in order to convince employers why you are best suited for the new role or industry.

A well crafted career change cover letter can set the tone and highlight your professional aspirations by showcasing your personal story.

1. Know Your ‘Why’

Career changes can feel daunting, but it doesn’t have to be. You can take control and change careers successfully by doing research and making informed decisions.

Getting to know people, jobs, and industries through informational interviews is one of the best ways to do this.[1] Investing time to gather information from multiple sources will alleviate some fears for you to actually take action and make a change.

Here are some questions to help you refine your ‘why’, seek clarity, and better explain your career change:

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  • What makes me content?
  • How do I want work to impact my life?
  • What’s most important to me right now?
  • How committed am I to make a career change?
  • What do I need more of to feel satisfied at work?
  • What do I like to do so much that I lose track of time?
  • How can I start to explore my career change options?
  • What do I dislike about my current role or work environment?

2. Introduction: Why Are You Writing This Cover Letter?

Make this section concise. Cite the role that you are applying for and include other relevant information such as the posting number, where you saw the posting, the company name, and who referred you to the role, if applicable.

Sample:

I am applying for the role of Client Engagement Manager posted on . Please find attached relevant career experiences on my resume.

3. Convince the Employer: Why Are You the Best Candidate for the Role?

Persuade the employer that you are the best person for the role. Use this section to show that you: have read the job posting, understand how your skills contribute to the needs of the company, and can address the challenges of the company.

Tell your personal story and make it easy for hiring managers to understand the logic behind your career change. Clearly explaining the reason for your career change will show how thoughtful and informed your decision-making process is of your own transition.

Be Honest

Explain why you are making a career change. This is where you will spend the bulk of your time crafting a clear message.

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Speak to the mismatch that may be perceived by hiring managers, between the experience shown on your resume and the job posting, to show why your unique strengths make you more qualified than other candidates.

Address any career gaps on our resume. What did you do or learn during those periods that would be an asset to the role and company?

Sample:

I have been a high school English and Drama educator for over 7 years. In efforts to develop my career in a new direction, I have invested more time outside the classroom to increase community engagement by building a strong network of relationships to support school programs. This includes managing multiple stakeholder interests including local businesses, vendors, students, parents, colleagues, the Board, and the school administration.

Highlight Relevant Accomplishment

Instead of repeating what’s on your resume, let your personality shine. What makes you unique? What are your strengths and personal characteristics that make you suited for the job?

Sample:

As a joyful theater production manager, I am known to be an incredible collaborator. My work with theater companies have taught me the ability to work with diverse groups of people. The theater environment calls for everyone involved to cooperate and ensure a successful production. This means I often need to creatively and quickly think on my feet, and use a bit of humour to move things forward to meet tight timelines.

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Feature Your Transferable Skills

Tap into your self-awareness to capture your current skills.[2]

Be specific and show how your existing skills are relevant to the new role. Review the job posting and use industry specific language so that the hiring manager can easily make the connection between your skills and the skills that they need.

Sample:

As the first point of contact for students, parents, and many community stakeholders, I am able to quickly resolve problems in a timely and diplomatic manner. My problem solving aptitude and strong negotiation skills will be effective to address customer issues effectively. This combined with my planning, organization, communication, and multitasking skills makes me uniquely qualified for the role of Client Engagement Manager to ensure that customers maintain a positive view of .

4. Final Pitch and Call-To-Action: Why Do You Want to Work for This Company?

Here’s your last chance to show what you have to offer! Why does this opportunity and company excite you? Show what value you’ll add to the company.

Remember to include a call-to-action since the whole point of this letter is to get you an interview!

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Sample:

_________ is a global leader in providing management solutions to diverse clients. I look forward to an opportunity to discuss how my skills and successful experience managing multiple stakeholders can help build and retain strong customer relationships as the Client Engagement Manager.

Summing It Up

Remember these core cover letter tips to help you effectively showcase your personal brand:

  • Keep your writing clear and concise. You have one page to express yourself so make every word count.
  • Do your research to determine ‘who’ will be reading your letter. Understanding your audience will help you better persuade them that you are best suited for the role.
  • Tailor your cover for each job posting by including the hiring manager’s name, and the company name and address. Make it easy on yourself and create your own cover letter template. Highlight or alter the font color of all the spots that need to be changed so that you can easily tailor it for the next job application.
  • Get someone else to review your cover letter. At a minimum, have someone proofread it for grammar and spelling errors. Ideally, have someone who is well informed about the industry or with hiring experience to provide you with insights so that you can fine-tune your career change cover letter.

Check out these Killer Cover Letter Samples that got folks interviews!

It is very important that you clarify why you are changing careers. Your career exploration can take many forms so setting the foundation by knowing ‘why’ not only helps you develop a well thought out career change cover letter, [3] but can also help you create an elevator pitch, build relationships, tweak your LinkedIn profile and during interviews.

Remember to focus on your transferable skills and use your collective work experience to show how your accomplishments are relevant to the new role. Use the cover letter to align your abilities with the needs of the employer as your resume will likely not provide the essential context of your career change.

Ensure that your final pitch is concise and that your call-to action is strong. Don’t be afraid to ask for an interview or to meet the hiring manager in-person!

More Resources About Career Change

Featured photo credit: Christin Hume via unsplash.com

Reference

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