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Be Yourself: 6 Ways to Stand Out From the Crowd

Be Yourself: 6 Ways to Stand Out From the Crowd

You give your best, perform well and hope it gets you noticed, but while good performance is important and critical to advancing your career; unfortunately, it’s not always enough. Many of your peers are doing great work as well. You have to do, have, be something more than that to stand out from the crowd.

How do you make sure people remember you? How do you make a solid, lasting impression? What makes you different and how can you stand out from all the rest?

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A massive difference isn’t required, but a noticeable one is. Often the simplest differentiation can be the key to establishing your brilliance.

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Be Yourself – Some Key Differentiators

  1. Attitude. Be enthusiastic. Be positive. Be engaging. Be passionate. An upbeat, professional attitude stands out. No matter what the workday brings, it’s important to show that you can stay confident and upbeat. People generally enjoy working with other people who are pleasant, encouraging, and constructive, rather than complaining, negative, rude and destructive.
  2. Engagement. Be friendly. Let your personality show through. Be approachable. Build relationships and trust. Engage others and show a genuine interest in their lives, and their thoughts. Find a mentor to help you get to know people. A knowledgeable, connected mentor can be a huge resource to help you build relationships and connects with others in your field.
  3. Communication. You might think excellent professional communication skills are a given, but you’d be mistaken. Many very competent people lack effective, professional communication skills. Pay careful attention to how you express yourself, not only in formal written communications, but also in e-mails, on the phone, and in face-to-face conversations. Be confident, respectful, and clear in all of your communications. Learn to be a better listener as well. Give your full attention, maintain eye contact, and try to really understand and absorb what people are saying.  An attentive, respectful listener is a rare commodity. Developing stellar communication habits goes a long way towards differentiating yourself.
  4. Contribution. Dedication and involvement stand out. Be more prepared than everyone else on the team is. Do your homework, gather your resources, and show up prepared and ready to work. If you’re actively engaged in the work process and make a significant contribution to the team, it will be noticed. You also might want to volunteer to contribute beyond your mandatory workload and offer to take part in charity events or be a part of other committees.
  5. Creative Thinking. Think creatively. Don’t be afraid to express your creativity and look for innovative solutions. Ask intelligent and useful questions. Ask questions that no one else is asking. It’s often not the answers you provide that make an impression, but your ability to ask insightful questions. Not only will you demonstrate that you can “think outside the box,” but that you can use your creative skills in a way that benefits the entire work team.
  6. Results. Results speak…very loudly. People pay more attention to what you do, than what you say. What do you do exceptionally well? Can you learn to do it even better? Strive to be the go-to person whenever that skill is needed. Your skill expertise doesn’t have to be odd or complicated; it’s actually better if it’s a simple, often required, skill that you do better than others. And don’t hesitate to toot your own horn occasionally. There’s nothing wrong with letting people know when you’ve achieved something significant, as long as you’re careful not to be annoying. Achievement stands out and drives career advancement.
  7. Take-Aways. They key is to decide what’s different about you, and then learn to capitalize on it. Pay attention to what you do best, what you bring to the table, what’s special about you. Be memorable or unique. Be remarkable and talented. Be professional and reliable. Be creative and interesting. Let what’s different about you be visible, work on cultivating that “specialness” and you will get noticed.

Featured photo credit:  Conceptual image of teamwork via Shutterstock

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More by this author

Royale Scuderi

A creative strategist, consultant and writer who specializes in cultivating human potential for happiness, health and fulfillment.

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Last Updated on November 3, 2020

How to Mind Map to Visualize Ideas (With Mind Map Examples)

How to Mind Map to Visualize Ideas (With Mind Map Examples)

When you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you may create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion. However, this type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It lacks in clarity and makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing. Instead, try looking at some mind map examples to learn how to mind map and visualize your thoughts.

Mind maps can help you zoom out and see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected. You may see connections you were missing before and find new ways of brainstorming solutions.

Below, you’ll find more information on mind maps and see some mind map examples to inspire you next time you need to organize information.

What Is a Mind Map?

A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram invented by Tony Buzan[1]. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to declutter your brain or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using a pen and paper.

The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

How to mind map: Mind map example

    Image Credit: English Central

    By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

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    3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

    The three steps are:

    1. Set a central topic
    2. Add branches of related ideas
    3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

    Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[2]

    Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

    Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

    Word it in a clear and concise manner. It can be a single word or even a central image.

    How to mind map: start with a central idea

      Step 2 : Add Branches of Related Ideas

      What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

        Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

        Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out nearby by connecting it with shorter lines or a line of a different color. Ensure that it remains organized.

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          You can always add images or other branches later, but that’s good for now.

          In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits.” Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

          Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

          Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

          Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

          Mind map example

            I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

            In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

            Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

            You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

            • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
            • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches.
            • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

            Branch by Branch

            Start with the central topic, and add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

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              Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                One your ideas have filled the branches, the mind map is complete.

                Branch by branch mind map example

                  Level by Level

                  In this “Level by Level” strategy of mind map examples, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. Here, you add elements on level 1:

                    Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                      Do the same for the next level (level 3). You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                      Level by level mind map example

                        Free-Flow

                        Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. There are no rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                        Free flow mind map example

                          Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you to help you start problem solving.

                          The Bottom Line

                          When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map using the mind map examples above. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and organize your thoughts.

                          If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective, and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on a phone and computer.

                          More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                          Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                          Reference

                          [1] Tony Buzan Group: Home
                          [2] Verbal to Visual: A Mind Mapping Approach To Your Sketchnotes

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