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9 Things Your Boss Doesn’t Do And You Shouldn’t Do At Work Either

9 Things Your Boss Doesn’t Do And You Shouldn’t Do At Work Either

Set yourself up for success through paying attention and following your boss’s example. There are bad habits you may be doing that you need to get rid of in order to impress the boss. Your boss will sit up and pay attention to the new talent and hard worker that you are. Increase your productivity and earn your boss’s attention by working on getting rid of the following work habits.

You’re boss avoids:

1. Sending Lengthy, Talkative E-Mails.

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    E-mails should be short and succinct. Write in short, actionable sentences. Express what is needed without expounding on how the task needs to be done. Be concise and even stingy with your words. Get to the point and be done. Not only will the receiver appreciate the exactness of the correspondence, but you will save time as well.

    2. Being Overly Passive.

    Speak up when you need assistance or have an idea that you need to share. Passivity is really the commission of the “sin” of omission. By saying nothing or simply “going along,” the importance of your unique input and voice are effectively silenced. Stop letting others have their way. Speak up to make an effective change.

    3. Taking “No” for “Never”

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      Sometimes a “no” simply means “not now.” It may mean that the time is not ripe to start a particular project or implement a new idea. Practicing perseverance through a difficult situation means being determined enough to follow through at the proper time. Besides, you made the effort to pitch an idea; whether or not you get to act on it is less important.

      4. Never Thinking About The Competition.

      Keep your skill set up to date to not only stay ahead of the competition, but to add value to your experience. Track what competitors are doing to stay ahead or fill the gaps in places competitors aren’t fulfilling. Continuously think outside the box to offer products, plans, or services that the competition has failed to consider.

      5. Not Planning For The Future.

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        Forward planning helps you avoid some major career pitfalls. For example, thinking ahead prevents workplace accidents. Or imagine scenarios that bring about success, such as preparing to ask for a raise or the benefits to the company and you in requesting flextime. Planning for the future provides both insight and foresight into furthering your career.

        6. Fearing Leadership.

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          In fact, it is through being a leader that your boss is where they are today. Cultivate the qualities of passion, honesty, and respect in your journey toward leadership. In studying your boss, ask yourself, “What are the qualities that made them the leader they are today?” Be meticulous about cultivating and expounding on these leadership values in your own life.

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          7. Failing To Be Proactive About His or Her Career.

          Being proactive in the workplace means “beating” your path to success. You are acutely aware of the doors of opportunity as they open or close. Write down where you see yourself in two or three years in your career. Is it management? Or would you rather be somewhere else? What steps do you need to take to get there? Write and then act.

          8. Thinking Negatively.

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            The advice to think positively sounds almost clichéd. Practically everywhere you turn ,someone is offering this patent, yet wise advice. There is truth to the fact that your thinking drives your action. Positive thinking drives positive behavior and actions. There is no reason not to think positively. After all, you are as good as anyone else; sometimes worse, and most of the time better.

            9. Missing The Tiniest Detail.

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              The “devil” is indeed in the “details.” Being detail-oriented helps you not to miss opportunities as they are made available and avoid costly missteps. Paying attention to the details may keep your business from losing customers. Attention to detail is cultivated over time and through practice. More errors are caught earlier and corrected before causing an all out disaster.

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              Last Updated on March 30, 2020

              How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

              How to Mind Map to Visualize Your Thoughts (With Mind Map Examples)

              Traditionally, when you have a lot of ideas in your mind, you would create a text document, or take a sheet of paper and start writing in a linear fashion like this:

              • Intro to Visual Facilitation
                • Problem, Consequences, Solution, Benefits, Examples, Call to action
              • Structure
                • Why, What, How to, What If
              • Do It Myself?
                • Audio, Images, time-consuming, less expensive
              • Specialize Offering?
                • Built to Sell (Standard Product Offering), Options (Solving problems, Online calls, Dev projects)

              This type of document quickly becomes overwhelming. It obviously lacks in clarity. It also makes it hard for you to get a full picture at a glance and see what is missing.

              You always have too much information to look at, and most often you only get a partial view of the information. It’s hard to zoom out, figuratively, and to see the whole hierarchy and how everything is connected.

              To see a fuller picture, create a mind map.

              What Is a Mind Map?

              A mind map is a simple hierarchical radial diagram. In other words, you organize your thoughts around a central idea. This technique is especially useful whenever you need to “dump your brain”, or develop an idea, a project (for example, a new product or service), a problem, a solution, etc. By capturing what you have in your head, you make space for other thoughts.

              In this article, we are focusing on the basics: mind mapping using pen and paper.

              The objective of a mind map is to clearly visualize all your thoughts and ideas before your eyes. Don’t complicate a mind map with too many colors or distractions. Use different colors only when they serve a purpose. Always keep a mind map simple and easy to follow.

                Image Credit: English Central

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                By following the three next steps below, you will be able to create such mind maps easily and quickly.

                3 Simple Steps to Create a Mind Map

                The three steps are:

                1. Set a central topic
                2. Add branches of related ideas
                3. Add sub-branches for more relevant ideas

                Let’s take a look at an example Verbal To Visual illustrates on the benefits of mind mapping.[1]

                Step 1 : Set a Central Topic

                Take a blank sheet of paper, write down the topic you’ve been thinking about: a problem, a decision to make, an idea to develop, or a project to clarify.

                Word it in a clear and concise manner.

                  What is the first idea that comes to mind when you think of the subject for your mind map? Draw a line (straight or curved) from the central topic, and write down that idea.

                    Step 3 : Add Sub-Branches for More Relevant Ideas

                    Then, what does that idea make you think of? What is related to it? List it out next to it in the same way, using your pen.

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                      You can always add more to it later, but that’s good for now.

                      In our example, we could detail the sub-branch “Benefits” by listing those benefits in sub-branches of the branch “Benefits”. Unfortunately, we already reached the side of the sheet, so we’re out of space to do so. You could always draw a line to a white space on the page and list them there, but it’s awkward.

                      Since we created this mind map on a regular letter-format sheet of paper, the quantity of information that fits in there is very limited. That is one of the main reasons why I recommend that you use software rather than pen and paper for most of the mind mapping that you do.

                      Repeat Step 2 and Step 3

                      Repeat steps 2 and 3 as many times as you need to flush out all of your ideas around the topic that you chose.

                        I added first-level (main) branches around the central topic mostly in a clockwise fashion, from top-right to top-left. That is how, by convention, a mind map is read.

                        In the next section, we are covering the three strategies to building your maps.  

                        Mind Map Examples to Illustrate Mind Mapping

                        You can go about creating a mind map in various ways:

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                        • Branch by Branch: Adding whole branches (with all of their sub-branches), one by one.
                        • Level by Level: Adding elements to the map, one level at a time. That means that firstly, you add elements around the central topic (main branches). Then, you add sub-branches to those main branches. And so on.
                        • Free-Flow: Adding elements to your mind map as they come to you, in no particular order.

                        Branch by Branch

                        Start with the central topic, add a first branch. Focus on that branch and detail it as much as you can by adding all the sub-branches that you can think of.

                          Then develop ideas branch by branch.

                            A branch after another, and the mind map is complete.

                              Level by Level

                              In this “Level by Level” strategy, you first add all the elements that you can think of around the central topic, one level deep only. So here you add elements on level 1:

                                Then, go over each branch and add the immediate sub-branches (one level only). This is level 2:

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                                  Idem for the next level. This is level 3. You can have as many levels as you want in a mind map. In our example, we only have 3 levels. Now the map is complete:

                                    Free-Flow

                                    Basically, a free flow strategy of mind mapping is to add main branches and sub-topics freely. No rules to restrict how ideas should flow in the mind map. The only thing to pay attention to is that you need to be careful about the level of the ideas you’re adding to the mind map — is it a main topic, or is it a subtopic?

                                      I recommend using a combination of the “Branch by Branch” and the “Free-Flow” strategies.

                                      What I normally do is I add one branch at a time, and later on review the mind map and add elements in various places to finish it. I also sometimes build level 1 (the main branches) first, then use a “Branch by Branch” approach, and later finish the map in a “Free-Flow” manner.

                                      Try each strategy and combinations of strategies, and see what works best for you.

                                      The Bottom Line

                                      When you’re feeling stuck or when you’re just starting to think about a particular idea or project, take out a paper and start to brain dump your ideas and create a mind map. Mind mapping has the magic to clear your head and have your thoughts organized.

                                      If you can’t always have access to a paper and pen, don’t worry! Creating a mind map with software is very effective and you get none of the drawbacks of pen and paper. You can also apply the above steps and strategies just the same when using a mind mapping tool on the phone and computer.

                                      More Tools to Help You Organize Thoughts

                                      Featured photo credit: Alvaro Reyes via unsplash.com

                                      Reference

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