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The Pros And Cons About Working From Home That No One Will Tell You, So I Will

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The Pros And Cons About Working From Home That No One Will Tell You, So I Will

It’s nice to be able to work from home while wearing comfortable pajamas, but it’s also awfully easy to get lonely. If you’re thinking about becoming a freelancer (or already are one), you might enjoy these stories that illustrate the pros and cons of working from home.

Opening a business is one of the most challenging, fulfilling, and nerve-wracking things I’ve ever done. I worked as a banker (“financial services representative,” was my fancy official job title) in a credit union for almost five years before suddenly finding myself job-less. Since I was a bit put off by the monotony of having an 8 to 5 day job and I had a decent amount of savings stock-piled away (read: enough to support myself for several months despite making some bone-headed business decisions), I decided to pursue self-employment as a blogger and personal trainer.

1. My first paying client (pro: nothing boosts confidence like helping a person change their life).

The scariest thing about working from home is not having a set income; even worse, it is just plain petrifying to actively seek your first paying client. In a typical sales job, you’ll be provided with scripts that help you communicate effectively, financial incentives that motivate you to deliver, and managers to keep you accountable; but if you’re a freelancer working from home, you’re the only one with the power to make the sale.

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I’ll never forget how happy and excited I was when I got a message from a friend that said something like, “Hey! I’ve been loving these fitness and motivation tips you’ve been posting on Facebook, and I know you’re training people now, right? Let me know how to sign-up, because I’m ready to make some changes!” That single client, a busy mom who ended up losing quite a bit of weight and developing a whole lot of strength, became a cheerleader who not only encouraged me to keep going, but also attracted the attention of more people who became clients in the future.

2. The devastating break-up (con: don’t expect everyone to support you, especially if you get obsessed).

When I first started a business, I became so consumed with wanting it to be successful that it was all I could think about. Add in the fact that I have an addictive personality (get obsessed with things very easily), and you can see how this might have spelled trouble for my relationship. My ex-girlfriend quickly became exhausted by how I never talked about anything but business stuff, and we ended up having several nasty fights about it. I was upset, because she seemed to be disinterested in what I was passionate about, and I accused her of not being supportive. She was upset, because I seemed to be disinterested in our relationship, and she accused me of being self-centered. I don’t think either one of us was completely “right” or “wrong.” I think she could have been more understanding and patient with me, since my life had radically changed in a short period of time; but I also could have been more considerate of her feelings, since a relationship can’t flourish without proper care and attention.

3. My smash-hit Kindle release (pro: if you hustle consistently, you will be rewarded for your effort).

With the help of a mentor, I plotted to release a Kindle book called, “The Busy Woman’s Guide to Getting Fit, Fierce, and Fabulous.” I have to confess I can be a bit of a perfectionist when it comes to putting out a book with my name attached, so it took me a (long) while to finish this project, but the result was so very worth it. I launched the book with a, “Get it free for five days!” promo, which helped it land in the #1 positions in the Amazon categories of women’s health, health/fitness/dieting, self-help, and happiness. This book has been read by over 25,000 people since its release, which boggles my mind.

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4. The bout of depression that followed (con: you better not get cocky, because success doesn’t happen overnight; it is an every day struggle).

The point of that Kindle release (other than helping people like you get fit and fabulous, of course!) was to direct traffic to a sign-up page for my online coaching program. Since I was selling the book for 99 cents at the time (it is now $2.99, but also better), I didn’t expect to get rich from it. I thought I might be able to get enough readers interested in my paid service to become financially stable. While I did pick up a few clients, the actual result didn’t come close to mirroring the expectations I had set for myself, and I found myself in the middle of an existential crisis where I wondered if there was any reason to bother trying anymore.

5. My first paid writing gig at Lifehack (pro: it’s nice to have freedom to express yourself and create your own schedule).

If nothing else, reader reviews of my Kindle book boosted my confidence as a writer, so I started looking for paid writing positions that might offer a steady income stream, which I hoped would remove the stress of not being sure I would have enough clients to cover my bills. Lifehack was the first place to take a chance on me. I am very thankful for that, because they gave me a creative outlet where I was free to express my fears, frustrations, and feelings in a way that would benefit people like you (yeah, you, over there reading this!). Contributing for Lifehack has also resulted in getting offers to write for other places like the Motivation Alliance, an online health portal and gamified fitness tracking service for corporate wellness plan participants. Now that I have a decent portfolio and track record built-up, I’m hopeful that I’ll be able to find more fun writing gigs just like these as long as I’m persistent about it.

6. The lonely days that dominated my life for half a year (con: you will get lonely if you’re used to working with other people).

The “freedom” I discussed above can quickly turn into loneliness if you’re not careful. Remember how I mentioned that I have an addictive personality? I got so consumed in writing Lifehack articles, personal blogs, and my first print book* that my social life (and sanity) suffered as a consequence. I love to hustle, and can keep going and going like the Energizer Bunny for a very long time (months!), but pushing myself too hard for too long inevitably leads to a depressing place where I start to associate work with misery. I was so used to working for hours without end that visiting my family, going on a hike, or enjoying a few drinks with friends started to feel like frivolous things to do. Eventually, the irony dawned on me: I wanted to make enough money through my writing and coaching to have freedom of time, yet I was acting as if I was so chained to my work that I couldn’t even escape for a brief moment to get away from it all.

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*This isn’t released yet; if you want to know when it is, please check out the links in my bio at the end of this article.

7. My “let’s meet in the middle” compromise (pro: you can pursue a part-time gig if you start to miss people and/or could use some extra income).

Given my loneliness (which I feel was a direct consequence of living and working alone for over two years) and the simple fact that some extra income would remove a lot of the pressure I had placed on myself, I started browsing job ads in my area. I hoped to find a gig that didn’t quite demand a full 40-hour work-week, because then I’d still have plenty of time to coach, write, and work on my own business. My search concluded in me accepting a position as an office manager at an area YMCA, which only requires about 30 hours a week (and combines fitness and business, two fields I take a great interest in). It amazes me how working with other people, something I took for granted in the past, all of a sudden felt like a welcome escape from the lonely days I’d grown so accustomed to.

8. The woulda, coulda, shoulda’s (con: you will make some bad decisions you wish you could reverse, no matter what you do).

No matter how hard you try, you will fall short. No matter how much you plan, you will make mistakes. No matter how hopeful you feel, you will experience disappointment. I don’t say these things to discourage you from pursuing self-employment. I say it to prepare you for a harsh reality that a lot of people like to pretend doesn’t exist. I’m happy I pursued my passion, but I wish I could reverse some of my decisions. I know I can’t hop in a time-machine to change the past and make all my problems go away, but I can reflect about it here, which might be helpful for you. Below are the four biggest things I would have done differently.

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1. I would have made more time for my friends and family instead of obsessing about work so much. You do have to say “no” sometimes so you can get things done, but that doesn’t mean you have to become a hermit like I did.

2. I would have kept a part-time job initially instead of diving straight into it, because that would have helped me save money I could invest back into the business (and I might have even avoided those lonely days).

3. I wouldn’t have published my Kindle book until I had a print book to sell, too. Self-publishing on Amazon is great for generating traffic to your blog, but I should have had more offerings than a coaching service.

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4. I wouldn’t have waited so long to start pursuing freelance writing jobs. I love to write (so much that I’d do it for free), but I think I could have been getting paid for it a lot sooner than I did.

Make sure you weigh the pros and cons of working from home before pursuing self-employment. If you have any points you’d add to this list or stories you’d like to share, do so in the comments. Please share with anyone you feel would be helped by it.

Featured photo credit: Woman and young girl in kitchen with laptop and paperwork smiling/GSCSNJ via flickr.com

More by this author

Daniel Wallen

Daniel is a writer who focuses on blogging about happiness and motivation at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on August 25, 2021

Why Personal Branding Is Important to Your Career

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Why Personal Branding Is Important to Your Career

As a recruiter, I have met and interviewed hundreds of candidates who have no idea who they are.

Without a personal brand, candidates struggle to answer the question: “tell me about yourself—who are you?” They have no idea about who they are, what their strengths are, and how they can add value to the company. They present their CV’s believing that their CV is the key to their career success. In some ways, your CV still has its use. However, in today’s job market, you need more than a CV to stand out in a crowd.

According to Celinne Da Costa:[1]

“Personal brand is essentially your golden ticket to networking with the right people, getting hired for a dream job, or building an influential business.” She believes that “a strong personal brand allows you to stand out in an oversaturated marketplace by exposing desired audiences to your vision, skillset, and personality in a way that is strategically aligned with your career goals.”

A personal brand opens up your world to so many more career opportunities that you would never have been exposed to with just your CV.

What Is Your Personal Brand?

“Personal branding is how you distinctively market your uniqueness.” —Bernard Kelvin Clive

Today, the job market is very competitive and tough. Having a great CV will only let you go so far because everyone has a CV, but no one else has your distinct personal brand! It is your personal brand that differentiates you from everyone else and that is what people buy—you.

Your personal brand is your mark on the world. It is how people you interact with and the world see you. It is your legacy—it is more important than a business brand because your personal brand lasts forever.

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I have coached people who have very successful careers, and they come to me because they have suddenly found that they are not getting the opportunities or having the conversations that would them to their next role. They are having what I call a “career meltdown,” all because they have no personal brand.

A personal brand helps you become conscious of your differences and your uniqueness. It allows you to position yourself in a way that makes you stand out from the pack, especially among other potential job applicants.

Don’t get me wrong, having a great CV and a great LinkedIn profile is important. However, there are a few steps that you have to take to have a CV and LinkedIn profile that is aligned to who you are, the value you offer to the market, and the personal guarantee that you deliver results.

Building your personal brand is about strategically, creatively, and professionally presenting what makes you, you. Knowing who you are and the value you bring to the table enables you to be more informed, agile, and adaptable to the changing dynamic world of work. This is how you can avoid having a series of career meltdowns.

Your Personal Brand Is Essential for Your Career Success

In her article, Why Personal Branding Is More Important Than Ever, Caroline Castrillon outlines key reasons why a personal brand is essential for career success.

According to Castrillon,[2]

“One reason is that it is more popular for recruiters to use social media during the interview process. According to a 2018 CareerBuilder survey, 70% of employers use social media to screen candidates during the hiring process, and 43% of employers use social media to check on current employees.”

The first thing I do as a recruiter when I want to check out a candidate or coaching client is to look them up on LinkedIn or other social media platforms, such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Your digital footprint is the window that highlights to the world who you are. When you have no control over how you want to be seen, you are making a big mistake because you are leaving it up to someone else to make a judgment for you as to who you are.

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As Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, once said, “Your brand is what people say about you when you are not in the room.”

In her book, Becoming, Michelle Obama writes about the importance of having a personal brand and her journey to defining her personal brand. She wrote that:

“if you don’t get out there and define yourself, you’ll be quickly and inaccurately defined by others.”

When you have a personal brand, you are in control. You know exactly what people will say about you when you leave the room.

The magic of a personal brand is that gives you control over how you want to be seen in the world. Your confidence and self-belief enable you to leverage opportunities and make informed decisions about your career and your future. You no longer experience the frustrations of a career meltdown or being at a crossroads not knowing what to do next with your career or your life. With a personal brand, you have focus, clarity, and a strategy to move forward toward future success.

Creating your personal brand does not happen overnight. It takes a lot of work and self-reflection. You will be expected to step outside of your comfort zone not once, but many times.

The good news is that the more time you spend outside of your comfort zone, the more you will like being there. Being outside of your comfort zone is where you can test the viability of and fine-tune your personal brand.

5 Key Steps to Creating Your Personal Brand

These five steps will help you create a personal brand that will deliver you the results you desire with your career and in life.

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1. Set Your Personal Goals

What is it that you want to do in the next five years? What will your future self be doing in the next five to ten years? What is important to you? If you can answer these questions, then you are on the right path. If not, then you have to start thinking about them.

2. Create Your Unique Value Proposition

Create your unique value proposition by asking yourself these four questions:

  1. What are your personality features? What benefit do you offer people?
  2. Who are you and why do people enjoy working with you?
  3. What do you do and what do people want you to do for them? How do you solve their problems?
  4. What makes you different from others like you?

The answers to these questions will give you the information you need to create your professional story, which is the key step to creating your personal brand.

3. Write Your Professional Story

Knowing who you are, what you want, and the unique value you offer is essential to you creating your professional story. People remember stories. Your personal story incorporates your value proposition and tells people who you are and what makes you unique. This is what people will remember about you.

4. Determine Which Platforms Will Support Your Personal Brand

Decide which social media accounts and online platforms will best represent your brand and allow you to share your voice. In a professional capacity, having a LinkedIn profile and a CV that reflects your brand is key to your positioning in relation to role opportunities. People will be connecting with you because they will like the story you are telling.

5. Become Recognized for Sharing Your Knowledge and Expertise

A great way for you to promote yourself is by sharing knowledge and helping others. This is where you prove you know your stuff and you gain exposure for doing so. You can do this through social media, writing, commenting, video, joining professional groups, networking, etc. Find your own style and uniqueness and use it to attract clients, the opportunities, or the jobs you desire.

The importance of having a personal brand is not going to go away. In fact, it is the only way where you can stand out and be unique in a complex changing world of work. If you don’t have a personal brand, someone will do it for you. If you let this happen, you have no control and you may not like the story they create.

Standing out from others takes time and investment. Most people cannot make the change by themselves, and this is where engaging a personal brand coach is a viable option to consider.

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As a personal brand coach, working with my clients to create their personal brand is my passion. I love the fact that we can work together to create a personal story that defines exactly what people will say when you leave the room.

Other People’s Stories

Listening to other people’s stories is a great way to learn. In his article, 7 TED Talks About Personal Branding, Rafael Dos Santos presents the best Ted Talks where speakers share their stories about the “why,” “what,” and “how” of personal branding.((GuidedPR: 7 TED Talks About Personal Branding))

Take some time out to listen to these speakers sharing their stories and thoughts about personal branding. You will definitely learn so much about how you can start your journey of defining yourself and taking control of your professional and personal life.

Your personal brand, without a doubt, is your secret weapon to your career success. As Michelle Obama said,

“your story is what you have, what you will always have. It is something to own.”

So, go own your story. Go on the journey to create your personal brand that defines who you are, highlights your uniqueness, and the value you offer to the world.

Featured photo credit: Austin Distel via unsplash.com

Reference

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