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10 Things Successful Young Entrepreneurs Do Differently

10 Things Successful Young Entrepreneurs Do Differently

Generation gaps are getting more and more severe and, when you think about it, it’s really no surprise. The rushing technological development of humankind that sprang in the 20th century and is still going strong in the 21st has been the catalysts to mark this gap so severely.

Truth be told, if I was born somewhere in the 40s or 50s, I would most definitely have a lot of trouble understanding the lives of youngsters these days. It is very challenging to even filter all the information that we now have access to, let alone put it to good use. I mean, I’m not terribly surprised by the look of bewilderment on my mom’s face when I show her my Twitter profile. Heck, even I get lost in there sometimes.

These years have been marked by the success of the generation of people popularly named the millennials. People born between the beginning of the 80s up to somewhere in the mid 90s can consider themselves a part of this group. There are some things distinct about this particular age group that makes them capable of achieving success very early in their lives. Here are some of the traits & tricks these young entrepreneurs boast about and rely on when making decisions.

1. Mark Zuckerberg: Be dedicated

(1) Mark Zuckerberg

    “Are you willing to make sacrifices for your passion?”

    As the owner and founder of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg is one of the most successful people in the world, let alone among the millennials. Dedication to work and innovation have set this 30-year-old genius apart from the competition, and his wealth is estimated somewhere around $33.1 billion. According to Mr. Zuckerberg, you should devote yourself to what you are doing and if this means missing a few nights out then so be it.

    2. Aden Levin and Rob Tominey: Know your market

    (2) Aden Levin and Rob Tominey

      “Essentially, we want to become the number one company for inexpensive but high quality travel.”

      Millennials are quite aware that the majority of their generation loves to travel and these two young entrepreneurs, being that they are a part of this generation, found it as an ideal place for investment. The broader message here is to be aware of the time that you live in and give the people what they want, don’t try to convince them into what they need, in other words, there words do your market research thoroughly.

      3. Jamie Dunn: Choose your friends wisely

      (3) Jamie Dunn

        “Surround yourself with positive people who believe in you.”

        As a 20-year-old who managed to put his own company together at that age and ended up hitting major success, Jamie Dunn definitely has natural talent for entrepreneurship. When he was asked what he found most difficult through his rise to success, he replied that the biggest problem was breaking out from that circle of people who claimed he would never make it. Encouragement is a big part of success.

        4. Ben Weissenstein: Start at the bottom

        (4) Ben Weissenstein

          “Everything started as nothing.”

          Mr. Weissenstein’s career started when he was helping his mother organize a garage sale at the age of 14. At the age of 19 he had already started a company with a couple of friends with no knowledge of how to run a business. He claims that their organization was rather simple in the beginning but, gradually, they learned and got more organized.

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          5. Amelia Humfress: Enjoy diversity

          (5) Amelia Humfress

            “You get to dive straight into the interesting challenges and do something different every day, rather than just making the tea!”

            In her first year as an independent coder, Amelia made a turnover of £408,000. Today, she holds Humfress’ coding, which has the flattering title of one of the best places to code in 2014 and currently offers classes in many types of coding, web design and much more. She claims that her motivation comes from the fact that her job always has to offer new and interesting challenges.

            6. Sheel Tyle: Find your inspiration

            (6) Sheel Tyle

              “Finding your motivation and drive that will not go away”

              The youngest on the Forbes 30 under 30 finance list in 2013, Sheel Tyle is an associate NEA at a venture capital firm and a young entrepreneur. He ties his greatest inspiration to an event he witnessed on the streets of Mumbai. Apparently, he witnessed a man haggling a price of his purchase from 20 to 19 rupees (which is somewhere around 2 cents) and this kind of devotion inspired him to start his own career.

              7. Sheryl Sandbergs: Keep the ones you love close

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              Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting In New York

                “Remember to find some times for the ones you care about”

                A woman that managed to get Facebook’s shares up 140% works hard but doesn’t only focus on work. Outside of work, she has an active life with her family and friends which is something that is generally considered a priority by millennials across the board.

                8. Steph Parker: Know your SEO

                (8) Steph Parker

                  “Learn about social media and modern marketing.”

                  As one of Forbes’ Top 30 under 30 Marketing and Advertising, her career has really been a diverse one. One of the crucial things that helped her move forward was her experience and understanding of how SEO works which helped her discover how content actually reaches people. If you want to be a modern entrepreneur, you have to use the right SEO tools in order to allow people to reach the idea you want to present them with.

                  9. George Burgess: Be a problem solver

                  (9) George Burgess

                    “Finding solutions to problems you have and then capitalize on them.”

                    As a student, Mr. Burgess had trouble finding any useful apps to help him prepare for his A-Levels. The fact that there is a considerable number of apps out there and that none of them helped students get through their education struck him as an ideal place for investment and it appears he was right. Focusing on real needs is a must if you want people to take notice.

                    10. Jamal Edwards: Make your hobby into a profession

                    (10) Jamal Edwards

                      “Turning a hobby into an entrepreneurship ends up leaving you with work you love.”

                      At 15, he started amateur filming with his friends, just for fun and he uploaded his first video in 2007. In just 7 years, he has grown so much that he worked with some of the most famous Pop Stars out there and gathered a following of 400,000+ subscriptions on YouTube.

                      There is a lot to learn from these young people and I hope this helps you on your way to success. Remember, not every entrepreneur makes it as quickly as these guys, so don’t get discouraged and things will definitely happen for you.

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                      Ivan Dimitrijevic

                      Ivan is the CEO and founder of a digital marketing company. He has years of experiences in team management, entrepreneurship and productivity.

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                      Last Updated on March 29, 2021

                      5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

                      5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

                      When I left university I took a job immediately, I had been lucky as I had spent a year earning almost nothing as an intern so I was offered a role. On my first day I found that I had not been allocated a desk, there was no one to greet me so I was left for some hours ignored. I happened to snipe about this to another employee at the coffee machine two things happened. The first was that the person I had complained to was my new manager’s wife, and the second was, in his own words, ‘that he would come down on me like a ton of bricks if I crossed him…’

                      What a great start to a job! I had moved to a new city, and had been at work for less than a morning when I had my first run in with the first style of bad manager. I didn’t stay long enough to find out what Mr Agressive would do next. Bad managers are a major issue. Research from Approved Index shows that more than four in ten employees (42%) state that they have previously quit a job because of a bad manager.

                      The Dream Type Of Manager

                      My best manager was a total opposite. A man who had been the head of the UK tax system and was working his retirement running a company I was a very junior and green employee for. I made a stupid mistake, one which cost a lot of time and money and I felt I was going to be sacked without doubt.

                      I was nervous, beating myself up about what I had done, what would happen. At the end of the day I was called to his office, he had made me wait and I had spent that day talking to other employees, trying to understand where I had gone wrong. It had been a simple mistyped line of code which sent a massive print job out totally wrong. I learn how I should have done it and I fretted.

                      My boss asked me to step into his office, he asked me to sit down. “Do you know what you did?” I babbled, yes, I had been stupid, I had not double-checked or asked for advice when I was doing something I had not really understood. It was totally my fault. He paused. “Will you do that again?” Of course I told him I would not, I would always double check, ask for help and not try to be so clever when I was not!

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                      “Okay…”

                      That was it. I paused and asked, should I clear my desk. He smiled. “You have learnt a valuable lesson, I can be sure that you will never make a mistake like that again. Why would I want to get rid of an employee who knows that?”

                      I stayed with that company for many years, the way I was treated was a real object lesson in good management. Sadly, far too many poor managers exist out there.

                      The Complete Catalogue of Bad Managers

                      The Bully

                      My first boss fitted into the classic bully class. This is so often the ‘old school’ management by power style. I encountered this style again in the retail sector where one manager felt the only way to get the best from staff was to bawl and yell.

                      However, like so many bullies you will often find that this can be someone who either knows no better or is under stress and they are themselves running scared of the situation they have found themselves in.

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                      The Invisible Boss

                      This can either present itself as management from afar (usually the golf course or ‘important meetings) or just a boss who is too busy being important to deal with their staff.

                      It can feel refreshing as you will often have almost total freedom with your manager taking little or no interest in your activities, however you will soon find that you also lack the support that a good manager will provide. Without direction you may feel you are doing well just to find that you are not delivering against expectations you were not told about and suddenly it is all your fault.

                      The Micro Manager

                      The frustration of having a manager who feels the need to be involved in everything you do. The polar opposite to the Invisible Boss you will feel that there is no trust in your work as they will want to meddle in everything you do.

                      Dealing with the micro-manager can be difficult. Often their management style comes from their own insecurity. You can try confronting them, tell them that you can do your job however in many cases this will not succeed and can in fact make things worse.

                      The Over Promoted Boss

                      The Over promoted boss categorises someone who has no idea. They have found themselves in a management position through service, family or some corporate mystery. They are people who are not only highly unqualified to be managers they will generally be unable to do even your job.

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                      You can find yourself persistently frustrated by the situation you are in, however it can seem impossible to get out without handing over your resignation.

                      The Credit Stealer

                      The credit stealer is the boss who will never publically acknowledge the work you do. You will put in the extra hours working on a project and you know that, in the ‘big meeting’ it will be your credit stealing boss who will take all of the credit!

                      Again it is demoralising, you see all of the credit for your labour being stolen and this can often lead to good employees looking for new careers.

                      3 Essential Ways to Work (Cope) with Bad Managers

                      Whatever type of bad boss you have there are certain things that you can do to ensure that you get the recognition and protection you require to not only remain sane but to also build your career.

                      1. Keep evidence

                      Whether it is incidents with the bully or examples of projects you have completed with the credit stealer you will always be well served to keep notes and supporting evidence for projects you are working on.

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                      Buy your own notebook and ensure that you are always making notes, it becomes a habit and a very useful one as you have a constant reminder as well as somewhere to explore ideas.

                      Importantly, if you do have to go to HR or stand-up for yourself you will have clear records! Also, don’t always trust that corporate servers or emails will always be available or not tampered with. Keep your own content.

                      2. Hold regular meetings

                      Ensure that you make time for regular meetings with your boss. This is especially useful for the over-promoted or the invisible boss to allow you to ‘manage upwards’. Take charge where you can to set your objectives and use these meetings to set clear objectives and document the status of your work.

                      3. Stand your ground, but be ready to jump…

                      Remember that you don’t have to put up with poor management. If you have issues you should face them with your boss, maybe they do not know that they are coming across in a bad way.

                      However, be ready to recognise if the situation is not going to change. If that is the case, keep your head down and get working on polishing your CV! If it isn’t working, there will be something better out there for you!

                      Good luck!

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