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10 Things Successful Young Entrepreneurs Do Differently

10 Things Successful Young Entrepreneurs Do Differently

Generation gaps are getting more and more severe and, when you think about it, it’s really no surprise. The rushing technological development of humankind that sprang in the 20th century and is still going strong in the 21st has been the catalysts to mark this gap so severely.

Truth be told, if I was born somewhere in the 40s or 50s, I would most definitely have a lot of trouble understanding the lives of youngsters these days. It is very challenging to even filter all the information that we now have access to, let alone put it to good use. I mean, I’m not terribly surprised by the look of bewilderment on my mom’s face when I show her my Twitter profile. Heck, even I get lost in there sometimes.

These years have been marked by the success of the generation of people popularly named the millennials. People born between the beginning of the 80s up to somewhere in the mid 90s can consider themselves a part of this group. There are some things distinct about this particular age group that makes them capable of achieving success very early in their lives. Here are some of the traits & tricks these young entrepreneurs boast about and rely on when making decisions.

1. Mark Zuckerberg: Be dedicated

(1) Mark Zuckerberg

    “Are you willing to make sacrifices for your passion?”

    As the owner and founder of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg is one of the most successful people in the world, let alone among the millennials. Dedication to work and innovation have set this 30-year-old genius apart from the competition, and his wealth is estimated somewhere around $33.1 billion. According to Mr. Zuckerberg, you should devote yourself to what you are doing and if this means missing a few nights out then so be it.

    2. Aden Levin and Rob Tominey: Know your market

    (2) Aden Levin and Rob Tominey

      “Essentially, we want to become the number one company for inexpensive but high quality travel.”

      Millennials are quite aware that the majority of their generation loves to travel and these two young entrepreneurs, being that they are a part of this generation, found it as an ideal place for investment. The broader message here is to be aware of the time that you live in and give the people what they want, don’t try to convince them into what they need, in other words, there words do your market research thoroughly.

      3. Jamie Dunn: Choose your friends wisely

      (3) Jamie Dunn

        “Surround yourself with positive people who believe in you.”

        As a 20-year-old who managed to put his own company together at that age and ended up hitting major success, Jamie Dunn definitely has natural talent for entrepreneurship. When he was asked what he found most difficult through his rise to success, he replied that the biggest problem was breaking out from that circle of people who claimed he would never make it. Encouragement is a big part of success.

        4. Ben Weissenstein: Start at the bottom

        (4) Ben Weissenstein

          “Everything started as nothing.”

          Mr. Weissenstein’s career started when he was helping his mother organize a garage sale at the age of 14. At the age of 19 he had already started a company with a couple of friends with no knowledge of how to run a business. He claims that their organization was rather simple in the beginning but, gradually, they learned and got more organized.

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          5. Amelia Humfress: Enjoy diversity

          (5) Amelia Humfress

            “You get to dive straight into the interesting challenges and do something different every day, rather than just making the tea!”

            In her first year as an independent coder, Amelia made a turnover of £408,000. Today, she holds Humfress’ coding, which has the flattering title of one of the best places to code in 2014 and currently offers classes in many types of coding, web design and much more. She claims that her motivation comes from the fact that her job always has to offer new and interesting challenges.

            6. Sheel Tyle: Find your inspiration

            (6) Sheel Tyle

              “Finding your motivation and drive that will not go away”

              The youngest on the Forbes 30 under 30 finance list in 2013, Sheel Tyle is an associate NEA at a venture capital firm and a young entrepreneur. He ties his greatest inspiration to an event he witnessed on the streets of Mumbai. Apparently, he witnessed a man haggling a price of his purchase from 20 to 19 rupees (which is somewhere around 2 cents) and this kind of devotion inspired him to start his own career.

              7. Sheryl Sandbergs: Keep the ones you love close

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              Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting In New York

                “Remember to find some times for the ones you care about”

                A woman that managed to get Facebook’s shares up 140% works hard but doesn’t only focus on work. Outside of work, she has an active life with her family and friends which is something that is generally considered a priority by millennials across the board.

                8. Steph Parker: Know your SEO

                (8) Steph Parker

                  “Learn about social media and modern marketing.”

                  As one of Forbes’ Top 30 under 30 Marketing and Advertising, her career has really been a diverse one. One of the crucial things that helped her move forward was her experience and understanding of how SEO works which helped her discover how content actually reaches people. If you want to be a modern entrepreneur, you have to use the right SEO tools in order to allow people to reach the idea you want to present them with.

                  9. George Burgess: Be a problem solver

                  (9) George Burgess

                    “Finding solutions to problems you have and then capitalize on them.”

                    As a student, Mr. Burgess had trouble finding any useful apps to help him prepare for his A-Levels. The fact that there is a considerable number of apps out there and that none of them helped students get through their education struck him as an ideal place for investment and it appears he was right. Focusing on real needs is a must if you want people to take notice.

                    10. Jamal Edwards: Make your hobby into a profession

                    (10) Jamal Edwards

                      “Turning a hobby into an entrepreneurship ends up leaving you with work you love.”

                      At 15, he started amateur filming with his friends, just for fun and he uploaded his first video in 2007. In just 7 years, he has grown so much that he worked with some of the most famous Pop Stars out there and gathered a following of 400,000+ subscriptions on YouTube.

                      There is a lot to learn from these young people and I hope this helps you on your way to success. Remember, not every entrepreneur makes it as quickly as these guys, so don’t get discouraged and things will definitely happen for you.

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                      Ivan Dimitrijevic

                      Ivan is the CEO and founder of a digital marketing company. He has years of experiences in team management, entrepreneurship and productivity.

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                      Last Updated on August 19, 2019

                      20 Critical Skills to Include on Your Resume (For All Types of Jobs)

                      20 Critical Skills to Include on Your Resume (For All Types of Jobs)

                      A resume describes your critical skills in a way that compels a hiring manager to want to meet you. That is a resume’s sole purpose.

                      And make no mistake: Writing a resume is an art.

                      Today each corporate job opening attracts 250 resumes on average, and somehow yours will need to rise above the competition. It’s actually harder to snag an interview from an online posting than to get into Harvard. But don’t let that intimidate you. Instead, open your laptop, roll up your proverbial sleeves, and let’s get to work!


                      Employers generally prefer candidates with skills that show leadership ability, problem-solving ability, and perseverance through challenges. So in the resume, you should demonstrate that you’re a dynamic candidate.

                      Refine the skills on your resume so that you incorporate these resume “musts:”

                      1. Leadership Ability

                      Even an entry-level employee can show leadership. Point out how your skills helped your department ascend to a new level. Capture leadership attributes with compelling statements.

                      Example:

                      “Led change that drove efficiency and an ability to cut 800 error-free payroll checks.”

                      2. Problem-Solving Ability

                      Most employees are hired to solve problems. Showcase that ability on your resume.

                      Example:

                      “Led staff in campaign to outrival top competitor’s market share during a down cycle.”

                      3. Perseverance

                      Have you been promoted several times? Or have you maintained margins in a down cycle? Both achievements demonstrate persistence. You look like someone who can navigate roadblocks.

                      4. Technical Skills

                      Consider including a Key Skills or Technology Skills section in which you list computer and software skills.

                      Example:

                      “Expert-level knowledge in Java.”

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                      5. Quantified Results

                      Nothing is quite as attractive as objective results. Did you increase sales by 25 percent? Win three new clients? Surpass the internal goal by 15 percent?

                      Use hard-hitting numbers to express your point. State the result first, and then provide a sentence or phrase describing the critical skills you applied to achieve the milestone.

                      Example:

                      “Boosted sales by 200 percent by developing new online platform that made it easier for customers to compare and contrast sizes, textures, and fit.”

                      6. People Skills

                      Employers prefer congenial staff members to prima donnas or mavericks. Relate your strongest soft skills.

                      Example:

                      “Organized, hard-working staffer who listens well and communicates effectively.”

                      7. Passion in the Field

                      Recruiters and hiring managers can intuit whether candidates care about their career performance by the dynamism behind the descriptions of their skills on their resumes. Are your efforts “transformational” or merely “useful?” Were your results “game-changing” or boringly “appropriate?”

                      The tenor of your words reveals whether you’re passionate or passive. (But don’t overdo it. See the “Hyperbole” section below.)

                      8. Being the Entrepreneur within the Corporation

                      Whether you took the initiative to create a new synergy or worked independently to land an opportunity, share how you furthered organizational goals through your self-directed efforts.

                      9. Your Adaptability

                      Have you switched career paths? Weathered a corporate takeover?

                      Make it clear that your resilience helped get you and your organization through the turbulence.

                      10. Confirming Your Expertise

                      Every job posting states experience requirements. Ideally, you want to meet these requirements or best them. But don’t exaggerate.


                      While proving that you possess the credentials described in the job posting, you can still stand out if you are able to offer additional special skills to showcase your personality.

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                      Consider adding any of these special accomplishments, if true:

                      11. Referencing Award-Winning Talents

                      If you played center on your college basketball team that made it into the Top 10 finals, then working collaboratively and cooperatively are among your natural callings. Be sure to say so.

                      12. Unveiling Your Work Persona

                      If you were repeatedly singled out for your stellar performance in work settings, becoming employee-of-the-month, top revenue generator, and so on — it’s worth mentioning.

                      13. Capitalizing on Commonalities

                      From Googling the hiring manager, you discover that she was formerly a Peace Corps volunteer in Belize. Listing your Spanish immersion course in Central America may draw her attention to the other outstanding skills on your resume.

                      14. Highlighting Creative Tactics

                      If, for example, in your HR role, you piloted an employee incentive program that became an industry model, include it. Such innovative thinking will command an employer’s attention.

                      15. Specifying All Accolades

                      Listing any honors received instills confidence that you will bring that level of perfectionism forward in a corporate environment.

                      16. Transferable Skills

                      You spend your spare time conducting your community orchestra. Highlight this after-hours pursuit to show that you have the critical skills needed to keep a team on task.


                      Take note: Hyperbole can hurt you. So, show your credibility.

                      Although it may be tempting to use embellishments to boost your experience, improve your job title, or enhance your education, resist. These days, a five-minute search will reveal the truth. And taking self-inflation too far could easily come back to destroy your career.

                      Hiring managers have their antenna up for resume hyperbole. A survey shows that 53 percent are suspicious that candidates are often dishonest.

                      Follow these guiding principles when writing your own resume:

                      17. Accurately Describing Your Degree

                      Make sure to differentiate between certificates attained and degrees earned, along with the name of the institution awarding them.

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                      18. Stating Job Duration with Honest Dates

                      Honesty is the only policy when reporting the length of a particular job. If you’ve been out of work for an extended period of time, state the reason you have gaps.

                      Whether you traveled, had to cope with a family emergency, or went back to school to change your professional track, communicate the positive outcome that came from the hiatus.

                      19. Claiming Only the Skills You Truly Possess

                      Unless you’re proficient in a software program or are fluent in a second language, leave any mention of them off.

                      Conversely, if you feel like you must include them, then accurately qualify your level of competence.

                      20. Being Honest About Your Role in a Project

                      You may think you were the lead person because you did most of the work, but chances are your supervisor thinks otherwise.

                      Besides the 20 critical skills to include on your resume, here’re some important notes for you.

                      Bonus Tips for Writing a Resume

                      You Only Have 6 to 7 Seconds to Impress the Employer

                      Hiring managers and artificial intelligence “bots” may spend only 6 to 7 seconds perusing your resume, which means you need it to teem with essential skills, quantifiable achievements, and action words.

                      If, in fact, you believe that a “bot” will be analyzing your resume before it even lands on a hiring manager’s desk, be sure to include some of the actual key words from the posting in your document. There’s no reason why you can’t customize your resume to each job posting.

                      Another tip: Be sure to show your resume to a few individuals who work in your field, so that you can fine-tune the information as needed.

                      Starting at the Top

                      The Objective at the top of your resume is optional if you’re seeking the same job you already have, just at different company. However, if you’re switching fields, it’s critical to include an Objective, which is a one-sentence summary of the job you want.

                      For example:

                      Objective: To become web editor at a thriving news website.

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                      If you’ve been in your field for ten years or more, you will probably want to include an Executive Summary. This is a one-sentence takeaway about who you are, including the critical skills you amassed throughout your career.

                      For example:

                      Executive Summary: Award-winning creative director with over ten years experience managing teams on three continents.

                      Depending on your field, you may also want to add some skills as bullet points in the Executive Summary section.

                      And what about your Education? If you graduated from college within the past ten years, include your Education just below the Objective section (and forgo the Executive Summary). If it’s been over ten years since you graduated, then include your Education at the very end of your resume. Only cite your grade point average (G.P.A.) if it was exceptional—3.7 G.P.A. or higher, or if you won scholastic awards.

                      Ideally, the critical skills you amassed during college, at your previous job, and throughout your career will add up to a riveting portrait of a professional who’s ideally suited for your dream position: You.

                      Tailor, Tweak, and Fine-Tune

                      If you’re targeting different kinds of organizations, you’ll need customized resumes for each outreach.

                      Don’t be afraid to parrot some of the words on the list of requirements back to the company. Many times, organizations will actually use the key words mentioned in the job posting when screening resumes.

                      Approach Your Resume as a Skills-Based Story

                      Like any good storyteller, lay out the framework at the beginning. Include the skills you’ve mastered and state how you can add value—wording your sentences in a way that reflects the specific job you’re seeking.

                      Are you vying for a sales position? Quantify your results: “Responsible for 50 percent of all sales that resulted in $750,000 in annual revenue.” Use your critical skills, peppered throughout your resume, to tell the exciting story of your distinguished professional career!

                      Researching the organization that you’re targeting will help you make your examples specific. Does the company cater to a particular audience or clientele? Be sure to note any experiences you’ve had with similar audiences.

                      Putting It All Together

                      A resume is not a laundry list. It tells a cohesive story. Your story should highlight your qualifications and critical skills in a way that makes a logical, well-constructed case for your compatibility with the organization and its advertised position.

                      Packaging your story into the concisely prescribed format of a resume means that it will read as a synopsis — one that will hopefully land you the job.

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                      Featured photo credit: Bram Naus via unsplash.com

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