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10 Perfect Jobs For You if You Want to Work from Home

10 Perfect Jobs For You if You Want to Work from Home

The idea of working from home (productively) and acting as your own boss sounds incredibly appealing to many stuck in the daily grind. But what careers are conducive to freelancing—and actually making a living? Assuming you’ve got the talent, passion and drive to work from home, what does it take? The following list details the jobs that you can most likely do fully from home or at least supplement your income through freelancing.

1. Graphic Artist

Sure, you can go to college for graphic arts and hone those skills, but the best tools to have in your arsenal include experience and software. A graphic designer who can not only prove he or she is worth $35 an hour, but also has the portfolio to back it up, will likely earn a new client. Toting a MacBook Pro equipped with your own legally-obtained software (Adobe Creative Suite or at least Photoshop) will sell you as a worthy professional and not some high school dropout doodler.

The strongest advice available for anyone interested in taking his or her talents on the road or online is to study up on marketing and self-promotion. These are the business skills one must have in order to successfully work from home because finding your client comes down to selling yourself and your skills.

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2. Music Teacher

Though you don’t have to be a guitar teacher to work as a freelance music instructor, teaching guitar allows flexibility and easier access to online lessons. Drum and piano teachers certainly can teach online as well as in-home, but guitar teachers have an easier time of it. Music teachers on all instruments have the ability to not only teach from their own homes or offices but also to teach as an independent contractor from a local music school. Getting a job as a music teacher in a well-known chain store often means having experience playing and teaching, as well as a degree.

3. Illustrator/Artist

Working as an illustrator means having the skills to take the imaginations of others and transform them into images. Illustrators often work with authors for anything from children’s books to graphic novels, and illustrators are a different class of creative talent than artists or painters. Fine arts and illustration are two separate fields. Some of the best ways to find clients as an illustrator include networking at conventions where independent authors gather, as well as through word of mouth (as with most professions, whether freelancing or not).

4. Social Media Manager

Social media and its multitude of platforms are not going away. If anything, more and more outlets exist for social media, from Facebook to Snapchat. Understanding how to use these platforms to boost a business’s SEO and drive traffic to a company’s website is a critical need. Most small businesses as well as larger corporations still don’t have someone dedicated and knowledgeable enough to manage social media according to an integrated strategic marketing plan. If tweeting according to dedicated hashtags and sharing infographics that encourage click-through action from Pinterest is something you excel at, you can most certainly market yourself as a social media manager. Work from anywhere with an Internet connection!

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5. Writer

You may not make a million dollars writing the next great American novel, but if you have the skills it takes to pore over brochures and edit technically then you can make a freelance career as a writer. Working from home as a writer means you can do anything from copy editing to content creation because you have the mastery of grammar as well as the background to communicate effectively, which is one of the most highly sought-after traits for potential employees. Many journalists start out as copy editors and move up to managing editors, but you don’t have to work at the local or city paper–you can just as easily market yourself and work from home.

6. Web Developer

Most people interested in web development have gone to college to earn a bachelor’s degree, but again experience and knowledge are the leaders in this industry. Anyone with a sharp portfolio and a decent client list can start selling web development services online and from home. Many web developers work at a job and freelance in their free time. Staying up-to-date with coding makes web developers better.

7. Photographer

Though you may wish to make a living photographing red carpet events and your favorite concerts, you are more likely to make a decent living as a freelance photographer providing clients with a service; photographing anything from jewelry in an independent store for the website or brochure, to helping insurance adjusters. Even contractors and small businesses selling repair services could use professional photographs to make their products and finished results pop. So, if you’ve got a talent and a passion for photography, invest in the right lighting and lenses and market yourself as a freelance photographer.

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8. Coach or Tutor

More and more parents choose to homeschool their children, so if you have an advanced degree and a knack for explaining difficult concepts, then you could make a living consulting as a tutor or even a coach for sports. Students who learn from home will usually need a tutor for at least one subject. Try looking into groups and networks for home-schooled children in your area. Look into what sports programs are available after class from local high schools and even middle schools because if sports, art or music have been cut you can develop an after-school program that could supplement your income from teaching in-home.

9. Software Engineer

If you have a professional engineer’s license and want the flexibility of freelancing as a software engineer, then you certainly have the capability to make a good bit of money. Though the requirement of holding a license varies by state, you will certainly want to show professional accreditation or certification before offering freelance software engineering services. The main reason an individual would choose to trade a salary starting at $85,000 is the freedom that freelancing offers. Money is almost a given in this industry if you know what you’re doing.

10. App Developer

Apps truly are the future as mobile media increases. More than 60 percent of people check mobile devices while watching TV and sleep with their smartphones next to their beds, according to a June 2013 report on staticbrain.com. The ability to create apps means that you can sell services to individuals as well as small businesses. With a truly innovative creation, your app alone could make you rich. The keyboard player of Dream Theater started working with developers to bring his musical innovations to life (search for Jordan Rudess and his MorphWiz app).

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Working from home and freelancing to supplement a regular salary afford individuals the flexibility to pursue their passions their own way. Marketing yourself as an independent contractor is the key to success, but once mastered, working from home can mean the freedom to take a month off to travel, as well as work 20 hours a day to afford the trip.

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

10 Huge Differences Between A Boss And A Leader

When you try to think of a leader at your place of work, you might think of your boss – you know, the supervisor in the tasteful office down the hall.

However, bosses are not the only leaders in the office, and not every boss has mastered the art of excellent leadership. Maybe the best leader you know is the co-worker sitting at the desk next to yours who is always willing to loan out her stapler and help you problem solve.

You see, a boss’ main priority is to efficiently cross items off of the corporate to-do list, while a true leader both completes tasks and works to empower and motivate the people he or she interacts with on a daily basis.

A leader is someone who works to improve things instead of focusing on the negatives. People acknowledge the authority of a boss, but people cherish a true leader.

Puzzled about what it takes to be a great leader? Let’s take a look at the difference between a boss and a leader, and why cultivating quality leadership skills is essential for people who really want to make a positive impact.

1. Leaders are compassionate human beings; bosses are cold.

It can be easy to equate professionalism with robot-like impersonal behavior. Many bosses stay holed up in their offices and barely ever interact with staff.

Even if your schedule is packed, you should always make time to reach out to the people around you. Remember that when you ask someone to share how they are feeling, you should be prepared to be vulnerable and open in your communication as well.

Does acting human at the office sound silly? It’s not.

A lack of compassion in the office leads to psychological turmoil, whereas positive connection leads to healthier staff.[1]

If people feel that you are being open, honest and compassionate with them, they will feel able to approach your office with what is on their minds, leading to a more productive and stress-free work environment.

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2. Leaders say “we”; bosses say “I”.

Practice developing a team-first mentality when thinking and speaking. In meetings, talk about trying to meet deadlines as a team instead of using accusatory “you” phrases. This makes it clear that you are a part of the team, too, and that you are willing to work hard and support your team members.

Let me explain:

A “we” mentality shifts the office dynamic from “trying to make the boss happy” to a spirit of teamwork, goal-setting, and accomplishment.

A “we” mentality allows for the accountability and community that is essential in the modern day workplace.

3. Leaders develop and invest in people; bosses use people.

Unfortunately, many office climates involve people using others to get what they want or to climb the corporate ladder. This is another example of the “me first” mentality that is so toxic in both office environments and personal relationships.

Instead of using others or focusing on your needs, think about how you can help other people grow.

Use your building blocks of compassion and team-mentality to stay attuned to the needs of others note the areas in which you can help them develop. A great leader wants to see his or her people flourish.

Make a list of ways you can invest in your team members to help them develop personally and professionally, and then take action!

4. Leaders respect people; bosses are fear-mongering.

Earning respect from everyone on your team will take time and commitment, but the rewards are worth every ounce of effort.

A boss who is a poor leader may try to control the office through fear and bully-like behavior. Employees who are petrified about their performance or who feel overwhelmed and stressed by unfair deadlines are probably working for a boss who uses a fear system instead of a respect system.

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What’s the bottom line?

Work to build respect among your team by treating everyone with fairness and kindness. Maintain a positive tone and stay reliable for those who approach you for help.

5. Leaders give credit where it’s due; bosses only take credits.

Looking for specific ways to gain respect from your colleagues and employees? There is no better place to start than with the simple act of giving credit where it is due.

Don’t be tempted to take credit for things you didn’t do, and always go above and beyond to generously acknowledge those who worked on a project and performed well.

You might be wondering how you can get started:

  • Begin by simply noticing which team member contributes what during your next project at work.
  • If possible, make mental notes. Remember that these notes should not be about ways in which team members are failing, but about ways in which they are excelling.
  • Depending on your leadership style, let people know how well they are doing either in private one-on-one meetings or in a group setting. Be honest and generous in your communication about a person’s performance.

6. Leaders see delegation as their best friend; bosses see it as an enemy.

If delegation is a leader’s best friend, then micromanagement is the enemy.

Delegation equates to trust and micromanagement equates to distrust. Nothing is more frustrating for an employee than feeling that his or her every movement is being critically observed.

Encourage trust in your office by delegating important tasks and acknowledging that your people are capable, smart individuals who can succeed!

Delegation is a great way to cash in on the positive benefits of a psychological phenomenon called a self-fulfilling prophecy. In a self-fulfilling prophecy, a person’s expectations of another person can cause the expectations to be fulfilled.[2]

In other words, if you truly believe that your team member can handle a project or task, he or she is more likely to deliver.

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Learn how to delegate in my other article:

How to Delegate Work (the Definitive Guide for Successful Leaders)

7. Leaders work hard; bosses let others do the work.

Delegation is not an excuse to get out of hard work. Instead of telling people to go accomplish the hardest work alone, make it clear that you are willing to pitch in and help with the hardest work of all when the need arises.

Here’s the deal:

Showing others that you work hard sets the tone for your whole team and will spur them on to greatness.

The next time you catch yourself telling someone to “go”, a.k.a accomplish a difficult task alone, change your phrasing to “let’s go”, showing that you are totally willing to help and support.

8. Leaders think long-term; bosses think short-term.

A leader who only utilizes short-term thinking is someone who cannot be prepared or organized for the future. Your colleagues or staff members need to know that they can trust you to have a handle on things not just this week, but next month or even next year.

Display your long-term thinking skills in group talks and meetings by sharing long-term hopes or concerns. Create plans for possible scenarios and be prepared for emergencies.

For example, if you know that you are losing someone on your team in a few months, be prepared to share a clear plan of how you and the remaining team members can best handle the change and workload until someone new is hired.

9. Leaders are like your colleagues; bosses are just bosses.

Another word for colleague is collaborator. Make sure your team knows that you are “one of them” and that you want to collaborate or work side by side.

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Not getting involved in the going ons of the office is a mistake because you will miss out on development and connection opportunities.

As our regular readers know, I love to remind people of the importance of building routines into each day. Create a routine that encourages you to leave your isolated office and collaborate with others. Spark healthy habits that benefit both you and your co-workers.

10. Leaders put people first; bosses put results first.

Bosses without crucial leadership training may focus on process and results instead of people. They may stick to a pre-set systems playbook even when employees voice new ideas or concerns.

Ignoring people’s opinions for the sake of company tradition like this is never truly beneficial to an organization.

Here’s what I mean by process over people:

Some organizations focus on proper structures or systems as their greatest assets instead of people. I believe that people lend real value to an organization, and that focusing on the development of people is a key ingredient for success in leadership.

Learning to be a leader is an ongoing adventure.

This list of differences makes it clear that, unlike an ordinary boss, a leader is able to be compassionate, inclusive, generous, and hard-working for the good of the team.

Instead of being a stereotypical scary or micromanaging-obsessed boss, a quality leader is able to establish an atmosphere of respect and collaboration.

Whether you are new to your work environment or a seasoned administrator, these leadership traits will help you get a jump start so that you can excel as a leader and positively impact the people around you.

For more inspiration and guidance, you can even start keeping tabs on some of the world’s top leadership experts. With an adventurous and positive attitude, anyone can learn good leadership.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

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