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These Awesome Tech Toys Will Make Your Kids Smarter

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These Awesome Tech Toys Will Make Your Kids Smarter

Boy, they sure don’t make toys how they used to!

Case in point, the three “toys” showcased in this featured video. Let’s give a bit of a rundown shall we?

1. Kano

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    The first is Kano, a $150 build-your-own-computer that allows 6-14 year old kids construct their own basic computer and create uncomplicated programs for it.

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    If your child is into technology, this would be the perfect gift for them. Not only does it teach some electrical and engineering skills, but it also holds their hand through some basic programming lessons. Not every kid will be thrilled with the troubleshooting process associated with perfecting software, so it is somewhat true that this kind of toy isn’t for everyone.

    That said, I think that in a world based on technology it can’t hurt to give kids a way to interact with the things that essentially run our lives.

    2. Cubelets and Moss

    Cubelets2z

      The second is Modular Robotics’ Cubelets and Moss, which are kits that allow you to create robots that interact with the world around them (in a limited fashion).

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      I’m a fan of this one, if only because of its simplicity. It’s easy to put blocks together, attach electrical motors, and see what happens. The messing around with the cubes alone could fill a kid’s afternoon.

      The only caveat I can think of is that the cubes are pretty expensive, costing hundreds of dollars for a dozen of them. Still, if you’d rather give your kids something more unique than a game console, these are a fantastic choice.

      3. Littlebits Kit

      Littlebits3z

        Lastly, there’s LittleBits, a company that sells a kit that allows kids to create all sorts of creative electronic devices (it’s based on their imagination in terms of how complicated they make them).

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        This kit is fairly open ended (by design), and though they provide you with instructions, it’s really up to your kid as to how they want to go about creating stuff. If you get this for your child, it’s important to remind them of the fact that they can break away from the instruction set and go about creating whatever they want.

        After all, these toys are all about being creative, and thinking about things in a way you haven’t thought of them before.

        Conclusion

        The benefits of these kinds of “engineering” geared toys are obvious. Getting kids to think about how things work at a basic level, and making it fun for them to build something substantial at a young age can only serve to inspire them as they grow older.

        What these toys really aim to do, is hold kid’s attention just long enough so that they make the “big leap from building by instruction to dreaming up new machines.”

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        And for what it’s worth, I see nothing wrong with that. Society can always use more dreamers.

        Has your child used any of these toys? Did they like them? What did you observe while watching them play? I’d like to hear your answers in the comments!

        Featured photo credit: Robotic Arm Lifting Dice/ Dan Ruscoe via flickr.com

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        Last Updated on November 25, 2021

        How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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        How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

        There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

        Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

          What Does Private Browsing Do?

          When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

          For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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          The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

          The Terminal Archive

          While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

          Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

          dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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          Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

          Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

          However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

          Clearing Your Tracks

          Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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          dscacheutil -flushcache

          As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

          Other Browsers and Private Browsing

          Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

          If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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          As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

          Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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