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How to Put a Wiki On Your iPad

How to Put a Wiki On Your iPad


    Wikis just aren’t for Wikipedia anymore. In fact, you can now bring a fully functional wiki with you on your iPad. While note-taking apps like Evernote and SimpleNoteApp have their charm (especially on the iPad) but a wiki has some power and flexibility those apps just can’t muster at this time.

    Wiki apps like what I profile in this post are great for technical documentation, glossaries, and other online documents that need a lot of links and media.

    If you are looking for a bit more power under the hood in your note-taking application, here are some wiki apps for the iPad to check out:

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    WikiTouch

      WikiTouch

      is another wiki app that made the jump from the iPhone to the iPad. It offers many of the features you’ll find in a traditional wiki that is offline/online friendly with the capability to synchronize your notes across multiples PCs, iPhones, and iPads. It has flexible management tools you can access from any computer using a standard web browser. You can also share notes with other people from either the web browser or your iPad

      If you supplement your note taking with other media like photos, documents, video, and audio clips, WikiTouch has got you covered. You can attach media to your notes and link between notes residing in your Wiki. All of your notes and media are available to you offline or online.

      WikiTouch has its own Internet server (in the cloud, not on the iPad like WikiServerPro) where the files and media you upload reside for storage and sharing.

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      Lastly, Wikitouch lets you password protect your important notes.

      WikiServerPro

        WikiServerPro

        puts a fully functional wiki residing on its own Internet Protocol (IP)-based web server on your iPad. I first came across this app on the iPhone and thought it was a great concept that got even better when it came to the iPad’s larger screen real estate.

        The developer likes to position WikiServerPro as more than a wiki because it can accommodate multiple formats including formatted text, ordered/unordered lists, tables, images, JavaScript, and audio/video. It also includes HTML and style sheets if you want to design and create complex pages for your iPad-based wiki

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        WikiServerPro also includes an integrated Twitter client, blogging, JavaScript controlled slide show viewer and other enhancements like tag clouds and RSS feeds just like you enjoy on a traditional wiki or website.

        All of these features together enable you to host content on your iPad for sharing across WiFi networks with the people around you for business or personal uses.

        Trunk Notes

          Trunk Notes

          is another Wiki app that does a wonderful job of bringing legacy wiki features like markup language to the iPad. The markup language is simple to learn and use but still might intimidate people who didn’t grow up having to write markup language for their supper. It has a robust search tool for an app in its class. You have the option to create links between pages and to web sites or documents just as you would in a traditional wiki. You can browse your notes as you can on any other full-blown wiki via a web browser.

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          It has full DropBox support for syncing Trunk Notes between iOS devices. This is a break from the other wiki apps for that use a web server for synchronizing data between devices and PCs.

          When a Wiki meets IPad

          While I am a diehard Evernote guy, it is hard for me even to deny that the wiki apps in this post have some power and options that set then apart from many of the other iPad note taking apps available out there right now.

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            (Photo credit: Definition of Wiki via Shutterstock)

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            Published on January 18, 2019

            Best 5 Language Learning Apps to Easily Master a New Language

            Best 5 Language Learning Apps to Easily Master a New Language

            Learning a new language is no easy feat. While a language instructor is irreplaceable, language learning apps have come to revolutionize a lot of things and it has made language learning much easier. Compared to language learning websites, apps offer a more interactive experience to learn a new language.

            The following language learning apps are the top recommended apps for your language learning needs:

            1. Duolingo

              Duolingo is a very successful app that merged gamification and language learning. According to Expanded Ramblings, the app now counts with 300 million users.

              Duolingo offers a unique concept, an easy-to-use app and is a great app to accompany your language acquisition journey. The courses are created by native speakers, so this is not data or algorithm-based.

              The app is free and has the upgrade options with Duolingo Plus for $9.99, which are add free lessons. The mobile app offers 25 languages and is popular for English-speaking learners learning other languages.

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              Download the app

              2. HelloTalk

                HelloTalk aims to facilitate speaking practice and eliminate the stresses of a real-time and life conversation. The app allows users to connect to native speakers and has a WhatsApp like chat that imitates its interface.

                There is a perk to this app. The same native speakers available also want to make an even exchange and learn your target language, so engagement is the name of the game.

                What’s more, the app has integrated translation function that bypasses the difficulties of sending a message with a missing word and instead fills in the gap.

                Download the app

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                3. Mindsnacks

                  Remember that Duolingo has integrated gamification in language learning? Well, Mindsnacks takes the concept to another level. There is an extensive list of languages available within the app comes with eight to nine games designed to learn grammar, vocabulary listening.

                  You will also be able to visualize your progress since the app integrates monitoring capabilities. The layout and interface is nothing short of enjoyable, cheerful and charming.

                  Download the app

                  4. Busuu

                    Bussu is a social language learning app. It is available on the web, Android, and iOS. It currently supports 12 languages and is free.

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                    The functionality allows users to learn words, simple dialogues and questions related to the conversations. In addition, the dialogues are recorded by native speakers, which brings you close to the language learning experience.

                    When you upgrade, you unlock important features including course materials. The subscription is $17 a month.

                    Download the app

                    5. Babbel

                      Babbel is a subscription-based service founded in 2008. According to LinguaLift, it is a paid cousing of Duolingo. The free version comes with 40 classes, and does not require you to invest any money.

                      Each of the classes starts with with a sequential teaching of vocabulary with the help of pictures. The courses are tailor made and adapted to the students’ level, allowing the learning to be adjusted accordingly.

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                      If you started learning a language and stopped, Babbel will help you pick up where you started.

                      Download the app

                      Takeaways

                      All the apps recommended are tailored for different needs, whether you’re beginning to learn a language or trying to pick back up one. All of them are designed by real-life native speakers and so provide you with a more concrete learning experience.

                      Since these apps are designed to adapt to different kinds of learning styles, do check out which one is the most suitable for you.

                      Featured photo credit: Yura Fresh via unsplash.com

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