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How To Create The Ultimate Online Portfolio

How To Create The Ultimate Online Portfolio

These days it is equally as – if not more – important to create a fantastic online portfolio in order to gain a following and, depending on your industry, work. This can be tricky and it’s very difficult to build if you’re not design or web savvy, but that doesn’t mean all hope is lost! Paige Donahue of Digital Information World shares everything you could possibly need to know for creating the ultimate online portfolio, from which sites to use to everything it should include:

Just imagine how much it costs to make a hard copy of your portfolio in high quality paper and top-notch printing. Then multiply it by ten. It’s enough to feed you for a week! Then imagine having an online portfolio that will cause you next to nothing and be flexible enough to send to dozens of employers and affiliates. Which one do you prefer?

Gone are the days when you have to print countless copies of your portfolio and distribute them to possible employers. In five minutes, you can set up a website that features your best works. Online portfolios serves the functions of the old-school portfolios and more. E-portfolios can widen your reach and attract opportunities you haven’t imagined in the first place.

Many professionals think a blog is enough to showcase their strengths, but it’s not. A blog is a good way to network with people from your profession, but it’s insufficient in presenting the body of your work. To highlight your best works, you need a portfolio to do it for you.

Before you move in first you need to know, why should you display your work on online portfolios.

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    Ten of the best free and paid portfolio websites:

    Behance – One of the biggest community of designers can be found on this website. Here, you can create folders for your project to create a more organized look into your works. Behance has a good categorizing system that groups illustrators, designers, painters, and photographers. This system offers a more efficient way to be discovered by companies. Members can even sell their works through this site.

    Portfoliobox – A professional-looking website is at the tip of your fingertips with Portfoliobox. No coding knowledge is necessary to create a quality portfolio using this website. Here, you can create a blog, a static page and even a gallery. An e-store can be added, and marketing tools are included in your account.

    Clippings.me – For writers, bloggers and journalists, Clippings is a good website to compile all their written works in one place. Users can easily add links of their published works online and even PDFs. This site is easy enough to customize and even provides detailed statistics of visitors on your portfolio. What gives this an edge is how you can embed any media to your works.

    Dribble – Budding artists get a better chance of being discovered through Dribble. Users can simply upload their works and have other members give them votes to help them reach the popular page. Works on Dribble can easily be shared on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest to direct more viewers to your portfolio.

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    4ormat – One of the easiest modifiable online portfolio, 4ormat gives users basic ways to tweak their pages. Hundreds of themes are available for your usage, from static to animated to dynamic ones. The presentation of your work in 4ormat is so simple that viewers are easily drawn to your work and not to the clutter. There’s a reason why thousands of professionals use this platform for their masterpieces.

    Writer’s Residence – For a stress-free portfolio, this one will save anyone the trouble. There’s no HTML or CSS knowledge required, just your documents that you want to present to the world. Writer’s Residence allows users to upload multiple pages of PDFs or their writing samples and instantly include them in their portfolio. For newcomers, it is an easy website to navigate.

    Dunked –  If you want a website that’s best viewed on any device, Dunked might be the one you’re searching for. Customizing the design of your portfolio is easy with their simple and advanced editing tools. It’s another good website to display diverse content from literary works to illustrations to videos and even audio clips. What’s even more amazing is it’s SEO optimized.

    Weebly – For a more customizable portfolio, Weebly can do it for you. This platform is flexible for any kinds of work. Be it a web design you created or a logotype you designed. It’s a good website to combine all sorts of works, and showcase all your talents in one place. They offer four membership packages that range from $0-$25 per month.

    Carbonmade – A nifty website that’s home to hundreds of thousands portfolios, Carbonmade is certainly one of the best portfolio websites out there. For free, users can upload up to five projects. With a paid account, they can display up to 50 of their best projects. It makes sure that every piece of work you upload in the site maintains its original quality. It’s stable so you can be reassured that your portfolio is viewable anytime.

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    Writerfolio – The no-nonsense approach of this website highlights your writings. It’s definitely the best way to showcase written works. Users has the option to categorize their works and lists them in an organized, clutter-free presentation. It will entice readers to read even further. No coding is necessary in Writerfolio since there’s a uniform theme for every portfolio, but it lets your writing shine without the glitter of a fancy design.

    Creating an online portfolio is really daunting. You have to make sure that yours stand out from the crowd. With these websites and their friendly support team, it’ll be a piece of cake to create a portfolio that will give you an edge.

    Best practices on how to use online portfolio sites:

    Display your best work – Include works that feature your current skills.

    Showcase variety – Explore different media, i.e photography, web design, freehand.

    Talk about them if you have to – If your works are abstract and obscure, you may want to provide a description text to give visitors a better understanding of your thought process.

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    Ask for feedback – Use social media or comment boxes to engage with other designers and artists for suggestions on how you could improve your work.

    Create as many portfolios as possible! – Make yourself accessible to different design sites like visual.ly to increase your chances of getting hired. Also, the sites features above aren’t the only ones where you could publish your online portfolio! Do a quick search to find more sites where you could boast your design chops.

    Paige Donahue enjoys reading historical novels and writing online articles. She considers copywriting for Rushessay her part-time and blogging at The Very Last Paige her full-time job.

    10 Best Websites to Create PortfoliosDigital Information World | Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn | Google+ | Pinterest

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    Last Updated on May 14, 2019

    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

    8 Replacements for Google Notebook

    Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

    1. Zoho Notebook
      If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
    2. Evernote
      The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
    3. Net Notes
      If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
    4. i-Lighter
      You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
    5. Clipmarks
      For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
    6. UberNote
      If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
    7. iLeonardo
      iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
    8. Zotero
      Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

    I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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    In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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