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A Great Tool For Programmers To Read More Comfortably

A Great Tool For Programmers To Read More Comfortably

A new typeface by Font Bureau is out to help coders or programmers to develop apps and programs. Called Input, it is a family of fonts designed exclusively for writing code. Input is so interesting and easy to use that it can be used by people who wouldn’t know a line of C++ from a command line. Input serves as a great tool for programmers to read easily. According to Font Bureau, Input is a flexible system of fonts designed specifically for code. What it offers is both monospaced and proportional fonts for richer code formatting.

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    Why will Input make programmers’ lives easier?

    When writing a story a writer chooses a font because he wants the character to communicate their text. However a programmer chooses a font for directly the opposite, he wants a generally characterless font that wouldn’t distort the massive bodies of code. With Input, a new kind of monospaced design, such as generous spacing, distinguishable characters, and large punctuation is adopted to allow each character take up the space that it requires.

    Mosnospaced fonts in the past have had shortcomings such as low resolution fonts; since they were designed from traditional computer terminals and could not be used on modern machines. They were also hard on the eyes during marathon programming sessions. Such monospaced fonts also made it difficult for typos to be spotted when skimming code, although they offered large punctuation and uniform indentation.

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    What the designer of Input, David Jonathan Ross, had to do differently was to come up with a typeface that took its aesthetic cues and merits from monospaced pixel fonts that coders already use. Thus he also made sure he disposed the technical limitations that restricted them. By drawing each letter on a standard 11-pixel grid; he begun the process of designing Input as a pixel font. To invent a typeface that would be effective on modern devices, Ross drew the outlines of the finished letter on top of each grid.

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      What does Input offer?

      Input may feel like a coding font when you consider the completely straight sides and its mechanical curves. Yet even though rugged, Input feels very modern. Input comes in 168 different styles, optional serified and sans serif varieties, with multiple widths. It can also be displayed in proportional and monotype styles.
      The proportional styles offer a more comfortable option to the monospaced fonts which you can use for text composition and correspondence to code. The capitals get wider so they can be felt at home with the lowercase. Alongside the Normal width the condensed styles can work together. The Serif provides an alternative texture to the Sans and the Bold weight gets wider so it can be as comfortable to use as the Regular.

      These features provide writers who want their text to be more prominent than their typeface. You can say it is appealing and incredible for programmers who rely heavily on formatting.

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      It is the belief of Input, technically speaking, that a superior alternative will improve typography in the coding world. According to the makers of Input, the Font Bureau, “by mixing typographic variation with the power of syntax highlighting, by composing text that transcends a fixed-width grid, and by choosing and combining multiple font styles, we can end all up with code and data that is ultimately easier to read and write.” Input hopefully is a sign that there will be a typographically rich future when coding environments, that programmers will overcome technical constraints and have full control over their display.

      If you visit the marketing page of the Font Bureau you will find a live preview of the font with real code. Input is available for free download for private and unpublished usage.

      Featured photo credit: Lazy Morning Programming in A Bed/VIKTOR HANACEK via picjumbo.com

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      Casey Imafidon

      Specialized in motivation and personal growth, providing advice to make readers fulfilled and spurred on to achieve all that they desire in life.

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      Last Updated on February 15, 2019

      7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

      7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

      Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

      Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

      Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

      So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

      Joe’s Goals

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        Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

        Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

        Daytum

          Daytum

          is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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          Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

          Excel or Numbers

            If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

            What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

            Evernote

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              I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

              Evernote is free with a premium version available.

              Access or Bento

                If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                Conclusion

                I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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