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Google and Their Educational Programs

Google and Their Educational Programs

As one of the world’s premier companies, Google has truly affected the way everyone accesses information and how people learn online. To further encourage and nurture the leaders of tomorrow, Google has created many different educational programs for all ages. Educational programs at Google are not just informative. They also provide funding for underprivileged and minority students who otherwise would not have had the opportunity to study computer science. This gives so many young students the ambition and dream to pursue a potential career in the burgeoning field of computer science.
These wonderful and innovative programs from Google have been gathered for your convenience in this list to see for yourself which programs would be most suitable for you.

Rise Awards

The Roots in Science and Engineering (RISE) Awards from Google are given to nonprofit organizations aimed at the education of students from elementary school to university levels in technology, science, math, and engineering. After the organizations receive the money, they are obligated to reinvest it into their communities. Nonprofits from all over the world have already entered with awards ranging from €1,000 to €25,000. In the past three years, over 75 nonprofits have already won.

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Doodle 4 Google

This is a great competition for school-age children that gets their creative juices flowing. To participate, K-12 students create an innovative new design that can be potentially used on Google’s homepage. After a student’s design has been chosen to be used, the student receives scholarship money and their school is awarded monetary grants. Themes are given to the participants like “what the future will look like.”

Google Code-In

Google’s annual Code-In is a programming competition targeting at 13-17 year old kids still enrolled in school. During the competition, the participants must finish complicated programming tasks, write code, keep documentation of their work, conduct individual research, and do outreach. The preliminary round winners are given t-shirts and certificates of completion and the top 10 participants go to Mountain View, California, for a tour of Google’s headquarters. This competition serves to give students a taste of what it’s like to work in the computer science field and to convince them to study computer science at the collegiate level. One past participant was grateful for the program since it required more and challenged him intellectually.

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LEAD for Computer Science

Google’s Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) program’s purpose is to help ambitious and intelligent Latino, Native American, and African American high school students discover careers in computer science. Students live in college campus dorms in the summer so they can get a feel of what life at college is really be like. Stanford hosts the one-week Level 1 Section for 9th grade high school students and UC Berkeley and the University of Virginia host a three-week Level 2 Section program for high school sophomores and seniors. Moreover, the programs have current minority computer science major at these programs to provide guidance to all the participants. The students go on tours, attend lectures sponsored by Google, and acquire more computer science skills than they arrived with. The program is also available with full and partial scholarships.

Zeitgeist Young Minds Awards

This annual Google competition is aimed at entrepreneurial and ambitious 18-24-year old entrants from all over the world. To enter, the participants make a YouTube video explaining how their project or innovation will impact the world. After the participants are narrowed to 12, they attend Google’s Zeitgeist Conferences in Europe and North and South America. World leaders come to these conferences to raise awareness and discuss how to address the world’s problems. Some past keynote speakers have included Stephen Hawking and Bill Clinton. Examples of past winning projects are internet literacy among urban school-age children and educating immigrant girls in Canada.

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Android Camp

Because Android has become one of the most popular mobile platforms, Google has created Android Camp. At this gathering, college underclassmen strengthen publishing, developing, and software testing skills in addition to learning more about developing Android apps. Android Camp is held at Google Headquarters located in Mountain View, California, and is completely free for all participating students.

Google Faculty Institute

The purpose of this 3-day summit is to give professors and teachers the tools they need to use technology more effectively in the classroom and in the lecture hall. Participants learn about how Google’s technology can positively impact how well students learn their class or course material. The educators go to lectures led by other professors, hear about different presented case studies from California teachers, write essays and participate in tech-education workshops.

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Geo Teachers Institute

The Geo Teachers Institute is designed as a training seminar for teachers who are interested in utilizing Google’s Geo Technologies with their students. To further increase its effectiveness, Google has teamed up with the University of Southern Maine at Lewiston-Auburn College and National Geographic to give the seminars in Maine and in Washington DC. Each participant learns how both Sketch Up and Google Earth are there to improve their students’ educational experience.

Google Research Awards, Faculty Program, Visiting Faculty

Google Research Awards are given to professors and graduate students conducting phenomenal research that is relevant to the company’s mission. The Fellowship Program is designed to award and support graduate students for their commendable computer science work. The 12 fellowships are within various technological areas like computer security, speech tech, and machine learning. For more experienced academics, the Visiting Faculty Program awards outstanding professors the chance to work at Google for up to one year. During their time at Google, the faculty members work on research problems that Google has been having difficulty with in addition to working with the expansive amount of data available at their headquarters. Moreover, each faculty member learns more about computer infrastructure and has the opportunity to present their groundbreaking research to over a million of Google’s worldwide viewers.

Online Marketing Challenge

The Online Marketing Challenge is designed to encourage professor-student collaboration in the field of online marketing. To participate, professors gather undergraduate students to form teams so they can develop together a strategy in online advertising for a nonprofit organization or business using only $250. This international competition is designed to raise substantial money for non-government organizations (NGOs). Each winning team becomes eligible to receive a Social Impact Award that carries prize money of $15,000 or more that must be donated to the NGO they created the online campaign for.

The awards and educational programs sponsored by Google motivate people from every educational level to become enthusiastic about science and technology. Each program or competition gives students and faculty both the opportunity to become more involved with computer technology and to make a positive impact on the world. Without such wonderful opportunities, educators and students may not live up to their true potential if these programs and competitions ceased to exist. Google has the power to change lives via technology education and limitless computer science possibilities.

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

Joe’s Goals

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    Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

    Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

    Daytum

      Daytum

      is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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      Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

      Excel or Numbers

        If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

        What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

        Evernote

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          I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

          Evernote is free with a premium version available.

          Access or Bento

            If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

            Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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            You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

            Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

            All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

            Conclusion

            I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

            What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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